Langton, East - Lanteglos

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

28-30

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'Langton, East - Lanteglos', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 28-30. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51094 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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Langton, East

LANGTON, EAST, a township, in the parish of Church-Langton, union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3½ miles (N.) from Harborough; containing 288 inhabitants. £38 per annum, the rent of 20 acres of land allotted under an act of inclosure, in 1792, in lieu of common right, are applied to the repair of the highways. Thomas Staveley, an antiquary and church historian, was born here in the year 1626.

Langton, Great

LANGTON, GREAT, a parish, in the union of Northallerton, wapentake of Gilling-East, N. riding of York; including the township of Little Langton, and containing 252 inhabitants, of whom 160 are in Great Langton township, 5½ miles (W. N. W.) from Northallerton. It comprises by computation 1550 acres, whereof 750 are in Great Langton township. The few houses here that give name to the parish, are so near the brink of the river Swale, that they are in frequent danger of being swept away. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 10. 10.; net income, £294; patron, the Rev. T. M. Hunt. The church is a small edifice, without aisles or tower, and stands in a retired situation about half a mile from the village. The old rectory-house, and two acres of glebe, are said to have been washed away by the river.

Langton, Herring

LANGTON, HERRING, a parish, in the union of Weymouth, hundred of Uggscombe, Dorchester division of Dorset, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Weymouth; containing 260 inhabitants. This place, which suffered much from an inundation of the sea in Nov. 1824, is bounded on the south-west by the Back-water, which separates it from the remarkable tongue of land called the Chesil Bank: the Back-water is covered with a profusion of aquatic birds of every kind, and there are not less than 100 swans on it, the property of the Earl of Ilchester. The parish comprises 902 acres, of which 320 are common; the soil is generally clay, alternated with sand, but beds of shells to a considerable depth abound in various places, and there no soil of any kind is found. The surface is hilly, and the surrounding scenery is characterised by features rather of boldness than of beauty. Here are some quarries of limestone, and granite of excellent quality is found. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 11., and in the alternate patronage of the Crown in right of the duchy of Cornwall, and Isaac Sparks, Esq.; net income, £126. The church has been enlarged.

Langton, Little

LANGTON, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Great Langton, union of Northallerton, wapentake of Gilling-East, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (W. by N.) from Northallerton; containing 92 inhabitants. It comprises about 800 acres, and lies to the south-east of Great Langton township. Langton Lodge is a neat mansion, on the bank of the Swale.

Langton-Long-Blandford (All Saints)

LANGTON-LONG-BLANDFORD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of Dorset, ¾ of a mile (E. S. E.) from Blandford; containing 202 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1100 acres. The soil is chiefly chalk, alternated with clay, the former occurring in the arable, and the latter in the pasture, lands; the surface is diversified with hills, and the lower grounds are watered by the Stour. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 10.; net income, £379; patron, J. T. Farquharson, Esq. The church had a chantry in honour of St. Mary and St. Thomas, and an hospital for lepers existed here in the reign of Edward I.

Langton-Matravers (St. George)

LANGTON-MATRAVERS (St. George), a parish, in the union of Wareham and Purbeck, hundred of Rowbarrow, Wareham division of Dorset, 9 miles (S. E.) from Wareham; containing 762 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the south by the British Channel, and situated on the road from Wareham to Swanage, comprises 2250 acres of arable and pasture in nearly equal portions, with a little wood, and 83 acres of waste. The scenery is bold and romantic, and the upper lands command fine views of the Channel and of the Isle of Wight; the soil is a heavy clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 8. 9.; patron, the Rev. John Dampier: the tithes have been commuted for £380, and the glebe comprises 18 acres. The church was nearly rebuilt in 1838, on a larger scale, at an expense of £900, by subscription; it had formerly a chantry for the use of the small priory of St. Leonard, at Wilcheswode. There is a remarkable oblong tumulus in the parish.

Langton, Thorp

LANGTON, THORP, a chapelry, in the parish of Church-Langton, union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3¾ miles (N. by E.) from the town of Harborough; containing 160 inhabitants. £28 per annum, the rent of an allotment of 13 acres under an inclosure act in 1792, are applied to the repairs of the highways. The chapel is dedicated to St. Nicholas.

Langton, Tur

LANGTON, TUR, a chapelry, in the parish of Church-Langton, union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5¼ miles (N. by W.) from the town of Harborough; containing 350 inhabitants. It comprises 1351 acres. The chapel is dedicated to St. Andrew.

Langton, West

LANGTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Church-Langton, union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3¾ miles (N. by W.) from the town of Harborough; containing 71 inhabitants. It comprises 973 acres. Walter de Langton, lord high treasurer of England, a favourite of Edward I., was born here.

Langton-Woodhouse

LANGTON-WOODHOUSE, an extra - parochial place, adjacent to the parish of Apley, in the W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln; with 7 inhabitants.

Langtree

LANGTREE, a parish, in the union of Torrington, hundred of Shebbear, Torrington and N. divisions of Devon, 3¼ miles (S. W.) from Torrington; containing 941 inhabitants. It is on the road from Torrington to Holsworthy and Launceston, and comprises 4594 acres, of which 322 are common or waste. The soil is various, in some parts fertile, and in others coarse and of inferior quality; the arable lands produce wheat, barley, and oats, and the pastures are generally good: the prevailing timber is oak and pine. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £29. 1. 3., and in the gift of the family of Rolle: the tithes have been commuted for £510, and the glebe comprises 64 acres. The church is an ancient structure, containing some rich specimens of architectural beauty. There was formerly a chapel at Cross Hill, in the parish.

Langtree, county Lancaster.—See Standish.

LANGTREE, county Lancaster.—See Standish.

Langwathby.—See Longwathby.

LANGWATHBY.—See Longwathby.

Langwith (St. Helen)

LANGWITH (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Mansfield; containing 194 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1360 acres, of which 230 are woodland, and the remainder chiefly arable; the surface is diversified with hill and dale, and the scenery enriched with wood, principally oak, ash, and elm. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 0. 2½., and in the gift of the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes have been commuted for £195, and the glebe comprises 44 acres. The church is a small ancient structure, and appears to have been originally of larger dimensions. A school is supported by endowment.

Langwith

LANGWITH, a township, in the parish of Cuckney, union of Worksop, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 7¾ miles (S. S. W.) from Mansfield; containing 443 inhabitants. The township consists of 1295 acres. The village is pleasantly situated near the source of the river Poulter, and has a beautifully romantic appearance; near it is Langwith Hall, once the occasional residence of Earl Bathurst.

Langwith

LANGWITH, a township, in the parish of Wheldrake, union of York, wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, E. riding of York, 5 miles (S. E. by E.) from York; containing 40 inhabitants. It comprises 718 acres, of which 168 are common or waste. The tithes have been commuted for £51. 13. 8.

Langworth

LANGWORTH, a township, in the parish of Barlings, wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln; containing 251 inhabitants.

Lanhydrock (St. Hydrock)

LANHYDROCK (St. Hydrock), a parish, in the union of Bodmin, hundred of Pyder, E. division of Cornwall, 2¾ miles (S. by E.) from Bodmin; containing 263 inhabitants. Lanhydrock House, which is approached from the river Fowey by a fine avenue of trees about a mile in length, and under an archway, was garrisoned for the parliament in the civil war, and surrendered to the royalists under Sir Richard Granville, in Aug. 1644; it is an embattled structure of granite, forming three sides of a quadrangle, in the style that prevailed in the early part of the seventeenth century. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Hon. Anne Maria Agar. The church is a small elegant fabric, with an embattled tower, and a few years since underwent a thorough repair at the expense of the Hon. A. M. Agar, the original style of the building being preserved. There is an ancient cross in the churchyard.

Lanivet

LANIVET, a parish, in the union of Bodmin, hundred of Pyder, E. division of Cornwall, 2½ miles (S. W.) from Bodmin; containing 1149 inhabitants. It comprises 5008 acres, of which 600 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24; net income, £667; patron and incumbent, the Rev. William Phillipps. In the churchyard is an ancient Maltese cross. About a quarter of a mile from the church are considerable remains of a Benedictine monastery, called St. Bene't's, supposed to have been subordinate to some foreign house. There are certain lands, part of its possessions, producing an income of about £150 per annum, which is applied in aid of the poor rates, with the exception of about £17 to a school. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Lanlivery (St. Brevita)

LANLIVERY (St. Brevita), a parish, in the union of Bodmin, E. division of Powder hundred and of Cornwall, 1½ mile (W. by S.) from Lostwithiel; containing 1809 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Plymouth to Falmouth, and intersected by the river Fowey; and comprises 6814 acres, of which 563 are common or waste land. Granite of very good quality is quarried extensively for the use of the dockyards of Plymouth and Portsmouth. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 6. 8.; patron, Nicholas Kendall, Esq.; impropriator, the Earl of MountEdgcumbe. The rectorial tithes have been commuted for £372. 10., and the vicarial for £304. 10.; the glebe comprises 15 acres. The church is a handsome structure of granite, in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, and consists of two spacious aisles, separated by a central range of clustered columns. There are two places of worship for Wesleyans.

Lannarth

LANNARTH, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish of Gwennap, union of Redruth, E. division of the hundred of Kerrier, W. division of Cornwall, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Redruth; containing nearly 3000 inhabitants. This parish was constituted in Nov. 1844, under the provisions of the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37. It is about two miles in length and nearly the same in breadth, and of hilly surface, with one principal vale, sometimes called the "Comb," thickly inhabited, and presenting a picturesque and pleasing aspect from the neighbouring hills, some of which, being disfigured by mining operations, form a striking contrast to the valley. Through the whole length of this valley, which is the middle of the parish, runs the main road from Redruth to Falmouth. Here are ten copper-mines, the principal of which is the Tresavean, one of the deepest mines in the county, and perhaps in the world, reaching 340 fathoms below the surface. The steam-engines of this mine are on a most extensive scale, one of them being of 240-horse power and 12-feet stroke, setting in motion 350 tons, raising a weight of 107,000 lbs., and discharging at every stroke 49 gallons of water. There is also an engine, vulgarly called the "man engine," used for lowering and taking up the miners, and thus saving them the fatigue caused by ladders; it is the only one of the kind in the county.

The church is a plain but neat structure, and internally very convenient; it was built in 1829, and previously to its consecration in 1845, was used as a licensed place of worship: it is now called Christ Church. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patrons, the Crown and the Bishop of Exeter, alternately; incumbent, the Rev. John Tucker. A parsonage-house has been erected, in the walls of which the incumbent has deposited some stone jars containing ecclesiastical records, which perhaps, some centuries hence, may possess value and interest. There are three places of worship for Methodists, each of a different section of that body. The derivations of names of places in the parish, are worthy of notice: Trevarth is derived from the old Cornish words Tre, a town, and varth, high, "the higher town;" Pennance from Pen, the head-land, and nance, the vale, "the head of the valley;" Tresavean, from Tresa, the third, and vean, little, "the third little town;" and Lannarth, from Lan, a church, and narth, or varth, (the n being substituted for the v, for the sake of euphony), "the higher church." The Chapel hill is close by, but not a vestige of any building remains.

Lanover.—See Llanover

LANOVER.—See Llanover; and the same with regard to other places having the prefix Lan or Llan.

Lanreath (St. Marnarch)

LANREATH (St. Marnarch), a parish, in the union of Liskeard, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall, 6 miles (W. N. W.) from West Looe; containing 651 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4560 acres, of which 400 are common or waste: the soil is various; there are some fertile portions of arable and pasture land, and others of very inferior quality. The river called Herod's Foot, and the lakes of Ball and Trebant Water, are within the parish. Fairs for cattle are held on Whit-Tuesday, Nov. 18th, and the third Tuesday after Shrovetide. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £32, and in the patronage of John Buller, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £522; the glebe comprises 70 acres. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with some Norman details, and contains a curious Norman font, and an elegantly-carved screen in good preservation, in one of the panels of which is a portrait in oil of Richard II. There are places of worship for Calvinists and Wesleyans. Some remains exist of a Roman encampment on Bury Down.

Lansalloes (St. Alwys)

LANSALLOES (St. Alwys), a parish, in the union of Liskeard, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall, 6 miles (W. by S.) from West Looe; containing 828 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south by Lantivet bay, and comprises by measurement 2774 acres, of which 80 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18; patrons, the family of Rawlings: the tithes have been commuted for £500, and the glebe comprises 7 acres. The church is a neat structure. There is an episcopal chapel, erected in 1839, at the expense of the Rev. W. Rawlings.

Lanteglos (St. Lanty)

LANTEGLOS (St. Lanty), a parish, in the union of Liskeard, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall, 2 miles (E.) from Fowey; containing, with the township of Polruan, 1269 inhabitants, of whom 549 are in the township of Lanteglos. This place is separated from the town of Fowey by the river and harbour of Fowey, for the defence of which here is an old castle, corresponding with one on the opposite shore. Barton manor-house, in the parish, being garrisoned for the parliament, sustained much injury in the civil war, and ultimately surrendered to Sir Richard Granville, who placed in it a garrison for Charles I.: that monarch narrowly escaped being shot here, whilst inspecting the harbour from a fine promenade in the grounds. The parish comprises 2773 acres by computation: the soil is various, partly a shelving slate, and partly good corn land; the surface is very irregular, rising into hills of precipitous elevation, and the lower grounds are watered by numerous springs. The copper-mine of Wheal Howell, here, was discovered within the last twenty years. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £14. 7. 1.; patron, and impropriator of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, Lady Grenville. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £315, and the vicarial for £225; the glebe comprises 8 acres. On the brow of a hill behind the village are the remains of an ancient chapel dedicated to Christ, serving as a landmark.

Lanteglos cum Camelford (St. Santy and St. Advent)

LANTEGLOS cum Camelford (St. Santy and St. Advent), a parish, in the union of Camelford, hundred of Lesnewth, E. division of Cornwall; containing 1541 inhabitants, of whom 836 are in Lanteglos. This parish, which is intersected by the river Camel, comprises by measurement 3562 acres; the surface is very hilly, and the soil for the greater part shallow and slaty, with some portions of good meadow land on the banks of the river. A slate-quarry is in full operation. The living is a rectory, with that of Advent annexed, valued in the king's books at £34. 11. 3., and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of the duchy of Cornwall; net income, £474. The church is a very handsome structure, with a lofty tower, and contains 500 sittings. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, and an endowed school on the national system. Near Castle Gough are some remains of earthworks.