Lidsing - Limehouse

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

85-87

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'Lidsing - Limehouse', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 85-87. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51107 Date accessed: 25 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Lidsing, or Lidgen

LIDSING, or Lidgen, a vill, in the parish of Gillingham, union of Medway, hundred of Chatham and Gillingham, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 4 miles (S. S. E.) from Chatham; containing 44 inhabitants. It comprises 439 acres, of which 119 are in wood. Here is a chapel of ease. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for a yearly rent-charge of £100, and there is a glebe of 10 acres.

Lidstone

LIDSTONE, a hamlet, in the parish of ChurchEnstone, union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford, 1½ mile (W. N. W.) from Neat-Enstone; containing 161 inhabitants.

Lifton (St. Mary)

LIFTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Tavistock, hundred of Lifton, Lifton and S. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (E. by N.) from Launceston; containing 1784 inhabitants. The manor and lordship were, by grant of Edward VI., vested in the ancestors of W. A. H. Arundell, Esq., the present proprietor. The parish is watered by the rivers Tamar, Cary, and Lyd, the last of which flows into the Tamar a little below Lifton park; the surrounding scenery is agreeably diversified. Mines of manganese are worked. Fairs are held on the 14th of February, the first Thursday in June, and October 28th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £31. 2. 11.; net income, £423; patron, Mr. Arundell. The church was embellished with a new altar-piece and with the royal arms, in 1831, by the patron, at an expense of £200; it contains some rich monuments.

Lightcliffe

LIGHTCLIFFE, a chapelry district, in the parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (E.) from Halifax. This chapelry, which is included in the township of Hipperholme cum Brighouse, and in the manor of Wakefield, is on the road from Halifax to Leeds. The chapel, dedicated to St. Matthew, has been rebuilt since its original foundation in 1529: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £120; patron, the Vicar of Halifax. In 1829, in a gravel-pit near the chapel, were found several consular and imperial silver coins, and some gold British coins of Boadicea, in excellent preservation.

Lightgrave, or Leegrave

LIGHTGRAVE, or Leegrave, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Luton, hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from the town of Luton; containing 411 inhabitants.

Lighthorne (St. Lawrence)

LIGHTHORNE (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Southam, Kington division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Kington; containing 384 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Warwick to Banbury, and comprises 2025 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 17. 3½., and in the gift of Lord Willoughby de Broke: the tithes have been commuted for £327; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 118a. 2r. 33p.

Lilbourn (All Saints)

LILBOURN (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Rugby, hundred of Guilsborough, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Rugby; containing 279 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the Avon, in the eastern part of the county, and on the confines of the counties of Warwick and Leicester. It comprises 1667a. 3r. 28p., of which 1540 acres are pasture, 120 arable, and 7 wood; the soil is generally of a strong and rich quality. The London and Birmingham railway is distant about three miles. The village is on the line of the ancient Watling-steeet, and is supposed to have been the Tripontium of the Romans; vestiges of a castle may still be traced. The inhabitants are partly employed in the stocking manufacture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6, and has a net income of £127, arising from 65 acres of glebe allotted at the inclosure in commutation of tithes; it is in the patronage of the Crown, and the impropriation belongs to Miss Arnold and the Rev. Mr. Arnold. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a parochial school supported partly by the proceeds of land allotted at the inclosure. At Roundhill, about half a mile from the village, bones and skulls have been found; and the parish contains some tumuli.

Lilburn, East

LILBURN, EAST, a township, in the parish of Eglingham, union of Glendale, N. division of Coquetdale ward and of Northumberland, 4¾ miles (S. E. by E.) from Wooler; containing 80 inhabitants. The township is bounded on the east by the river Till, and comprises about 900 acres of land, of a dry gravelly soil; about two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture and moor: the surface is hilly and undulated. An inferior kind of stone is quarried. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £55. 7. 6., with a glebe of 28 acres, and the impropriate for £122. 12. 4. In 1768, on the removal of a heap of stones, the base and fragments of a cross, with four rows of steps, were discovered beneath.

Lilburn, West

LILBURN, WEST, a township, in the parish of Eglingham, union of Glendale, N. division of Coquetdale ward and of Northumberland, 3¼ miles (S. E. by E.) from Wooler; containing 226 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres, mostly arable, including 200 of woodland: the soil is rich, producing excellent and abundant crops; the scenery embraces the Cheviot hills on the west, and on the east those of Chillingham. The Lilburn river, which runs through the township, abounds in trout. Lilburn Tower, a fine stone mansion in the Elizabethan style, was built in 1834, near the site of a border tower, from a design of Mr. Dobson's, at a cost of £25,000. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £262. 11. 7., and the vicarial for £130. 7. At the west end of the village, near the remains of the ancient mansion, are those of a chapel of ease.

Lilford (St. Peter)

LILFORD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Huxloe, though locally in that of Polebrook, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (S. by W.) from Oundle; containing, with the hamlet of Wigsthorpe, 133 inhabitants. It comprises 1807a. 1r. 14p., and is intersected by the road from Thrapston to Oundle, and bounded by the river Nene. The living is a vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Thorpe-Achurch, and valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 3½. A school is supported by Lord Lilford, who derives his title from the place.

Lilleshall (St. Mary)

LILLESHALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newport, Newport division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 3 miles (S. S. W.) from Newport; containing, with the townships of Donnington, Abbey St. John, and Muxton, 3851 inhabitants. About 1145, an abbey for Regular canons of the order of St. Augustine was founded here, which at the Dissolution had a revenue of £327. 10.: the ivy-covered ruins of the buildings present an interesting and imposing object. A branch of the Donnington-Wood, or Marquess of Stafford's, canal, terminates in the northern part of the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 17. 11.; net income, £345; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Sutherland; incumbent, the Rev. George Livingstone Fenton. The church, with the exception of its handsome tower, which is of much older date, appears to have been built about the time of the Restoration: in the chancel is a beautiful marble monument in memory of Sir Richard and Lady Katherine Leveson. A second church has been erected at Donnington-Wood, at the expense of the Duke of Sutherland. There are two schools, one at Donnington, and the other at Lilleshall, the latter supported by his grace. Lady Katherine Leveson left several benefactions to the poor.

Lilley (St. Peter)

LILLEY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Hitchin, hundred of Hitchin and Pirton, county of Hertford, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Luton, containing 475 inhabitants. The village is on the road from Hitchin to Luton. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the platting of straw. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 8. 9.; net income, £340; patrons, the Master and Fellows of St. John's College, Cambridge: there is a glebe-house, with 30 acres of land. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Lillings Ambo, or East and West Lillings

LILLINGS AMBO, or East and West Lillings, a township, in the parish of Sheriff-Hutton, wapentake of Bulmer, union and N. riding of York, 9½ miles (N. N. E.) from York; containing 208 inhabitants. The township comprises by measurement 1530 acres, and is situated at the head of the Foss navigation. Lillings Hall stands to the east of East Lillings. The tithes for West Lillings were commuted for land in 1769.

Lillingstone-Dayrell (St. Nicholas)

LILLINGSTONE-DAYRELL (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Buckingham, 4½ miles (N.) from Buckingham; containing 187 inhabitants. It comprises 2223a. 1p., of which 200 acres are arable, about 400 woodland, and the remainder meadow and pasture. The surface in some parts is hilly, commanding extensive prospects, and the lower grounds are watered by a brook; the soil is clayey and deep. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 9. 7., and in the gift of Richard Dayrell, Esq., whose ancestors have been patrons upwards of 500 years, and have resided here for eighteen generations: the tithes have been commuted for £278. 8. 6., and the glebe comprises one acre.

Lillingstone-Lovell (St. Mary)

LILLINGSTONE-LOVELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Buckingham, 4¾ miles (N. by E.) from Buckingham; containing 140 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1223 acres, of which 280 are arable, 827 meadow and pasture, and 108 woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 9. 4½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £177, and the glebe comprises 39 acres.

Lillington (St. Martin)

LILLINGTON (St. Martin), a parish, in the union and hundred of Sherborne, Sherborne division of Dorset, 3½ miles (S. by W.) from the town of Sherborne; containing 191 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 12. 3½.; patron, R. Gordon, Esq.

Lillington (St. Mary Magdalene)

LILLINGTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Warwick, Kenilworth division of the hundred of Knightlow, S. division of the county of Warwick, 1 mile (N.) from the town of Leamington; containing 272 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1381 acres: sandstone of soft texture is quarried for building purposes. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 13. 4.; patron and impropriator, the Rev. Henry Wise: the tithes have been commuted for £167, and the glebe consists of 40 acres. The church is an ancient structure, combining various styles of English architecture.

Lillisdon

LILLISDON, a tything, in the parish and hundred of North Curry, union of Taunton, W. division of the county of Somerset, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Taunton; containing 238 inhabitants.

Lilly

LILLY, a hamlet, in the parish of Catmere, union of Wantage, hundred of Compton, county of Berks, 5 miles (W. by S.) from the town of East Ilsley; containing 74 inhabitants.

Lilstock (St. Andrew)

LILSTOCK (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 11¼ miles (N. W.) from Bridgwater; containing 48 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by Bridgwater bay in the Bristol Channel; and contains limestone of excellent quality for building, which is extensively quarried. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Stogursey: the tithes were commuted for land in 1803.

Lilwall

LILWALL, with Pembers-Oak and Chickward, a township, in the parish and poor-law union of Kington, hundred of Huntington, county of Hereford; containing 380 inhabitants.

Limber Magna (St. Peter)

LIMBER MAGNA (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Caistor, E. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5¼ miles (N. by E.) from Caistor; containing 480 inhabitants. The parish comprises 5026a. 3r. 19p.; the substratum is chiefly chalk of hard texture, which is burnt into lime for manure. A statute-fair is held on the first Monday in May. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 18. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £623; impropriator, the Earl of Yarborough: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1812. The church was given in the time of Henry II., by Richard de Humet, constable of Normandy, to the Cistercian abbey of Aulnay or Aveny, in Normandy, the abbot of which established a cell here; this cell, at the suppression of alien priories, was sold to the Carthusians of St. Anne, near Coventry. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The mausoleum of the Earl of Yarborough is in the parish.

Limber Parva

LIMBER PARVA, a hamlet, in the parish of Brocklesby, union of Caistor, E. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7 miles (N.) from the town of Caistor; containing 49 inhabitants.

Limbury cum Biscott

LIMBURY cum BISCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Luton, hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford, 2½ miles (N. W. by N.) from the town of Luton; containing 316 inhabitants.

Limebrook

LIMEBROOK, a township, in the parish and hundred of Wigmore, poor-law union of Ludlow, county of Hereford; containing 178 inhabitants.

Limehouse (St. Anne)

LIMEHOUSE (St. Anne), a parish, in the union of Stepney, Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 2 miles (E. by S.) from London; containing, with part of Ratcliffe hamlet, 21,121 inhabitants. This place, which is situated on the north bank of the Thames, was formerly a hamlet belonging to Stepney, from which parish it was separated in 1730. It consists principally of a number of narrow streets and irregular buildings, diverging from the principal thoroughfare. There are several respectable houses; and among the numerous shops, warehouses, and manufactories, are some spacious and well-built structures, though many of the buildings are of an inferior description. The streets are partly paved, and lighted with gas. Here are a manufactory for sailcloth and ropes; an extensive bleaching-ground; and large manufactories for articles in iron, particularly chain-cables, anchors, tanks, and all kinds of machinery. Ship-blocks are also made, and there are various other trades connected with shipping; ship-building is carried on at Limehouse Hole. At the eastern extremity of the parish are the West India Docks, which extend eastward to Blackwall. The northern dock, for unloading ships, covers thirty acres, and is capable of accommodating 300 West Indiamen; the southern, for loading outward bound vessels, covers twenty-four acres, and will admit 200 ships: the former was opened in 1802, and the latter in 1805. They have extensive ranges of building in which foreign goods are deposited previous to the payment of the duty. A canal from the river Lea, called the New Cut, intersects the parish and joins the Thames, superseding the circuitous navigation round the Isle of Dogs; the Regent's canal likewise passes through Limehouse, and just before its junction with the Thames, has a basin capable of admitting vessels of from 200 to 300 tons' burthen. On the south side of the Commercial-road is a tramroad, from the West India Docks to Whitechapel, constructed at an expense of nearly £20,000. The London and Blackwall railway also crosses the parish. The living is a rectory not in charge; net income, £714; patrons, the Principal and Fellows of Brasenose College, Oxford. The church, which is one of the fifty churches erected pursuant to an act passed in the reign of Queen Anne, is a massive structure, with two angular turrets at the east end, and a square tower at the west end, built after a design by Nicholas Hawksmoor, one of the pupils of Sir Christopher Wren. At Ratcliffe is a second incumbency. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.



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