Lineside - Linthwaite

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

95-98

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'Lineside - Linthwaite', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 95-98. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51109 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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Lineside

LINESIDE, a township, in the parish of Arthuret, union of Longtown, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Longtown; containing 128 inhabitants. It lies at the confluence of the Esk and Line rivers, and is intersected by the Hallburn rivulet. A school has a small endowment.

Linford.—See Broomey-Lodge.

LINFORD.—See Broomey-Lodge.

Linford, Great (St. Andrew)

LINFORD, GREAT (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 1¾ mile (W. S. W.) from Newport-Pagnell; containing 474 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the Ouse, and comprises 1787a. 2r. 6p., of which 371 acres are arable, 1185 pasture, 118 meadow on the banks of the river, and 78 woodland. Its substratum contains limestone, which is quarried chiefly for repairing the roads: a layer of firmer texture, at a greater depth, impervious to atmospheric influence, might be worked for building purposes. Many of the females are employed in making bobbin-lace. The Grand Junction canal, and the Newport-Pagnell branch, both pass through the parish; and the Wolverton station on the London and Birmingham railway is within two miles. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 0. 2½., and in the gift of H. A. Uthwatt, Esq., lord of the manor: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe comprises 27½ acres. The church is a neat structure in the later English style, with a north porch, the roof of which is elegantly groined. There is a place of worship for Independents. In 1702, Sir William Pritchard bequeathed a rent-charge of £24 in support of an almshouse for six persons, and another of £10 for instruction; and Lady Pritchard subsequently left a sum of money for apprenticing boys, and clothing the almspeople. In the clay formation on which the parish is situated, are found various fossils; and on the lands of Mr. Uthwatt, is a copious spring strongly impregnated with sulphuretted hydrogen gas, similar in its properties to the Harrogate water. Dr. Richard Sandy, otherwise Napier, presented to the rectory in 1589, was held in superstitious reverence for his skill in the sciences of physic and astrology.

Linford, Little (St. Leonard)

LINFORD, LITTLE (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 2¼ miles (W. by N.) from Newport-Pagnell; containing 64 inhabitants. The manor was anciently in the Pagnells, from whom it came by successive female heirs to the families of Somery, Botetort, Burnell, and Bermingham. It was purchased of the last-mentioned by the Botelers, and passed with Great Linford till about 1658, when it was purchased of the Thompsons by Messrs. Kilpin and others, by whom it was sold to an ancestor of the Knapp family. The parish is situated on the Ouse, which bounds it on the east; and comprises 600 acres, principally grazing-land, with some rich meadows on the banks of the river: about 100 acres are wood, and a portion arable. The surface is undulated, and the soil clay, with a rock substratum: good limestone is obtained. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £66; patron and impropriator, Matthew Knapp, Esq., lord of the manor. The church was formerly a chapel of ease to the vicarage of Newport-Pagnell: the inhabitants bury at Haversham.

Ling (St. Bartholomew)

LING (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of Andersfield, W. division of Somerset, 6¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Bridgwater; containing, with part of the hamlet of Boroughbridge, 422 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1409a. 35p.; the river Parret flows on the north-east, and the Tone on the south-east: over the latter a neat bridge has been erected. The Isle of Athelney, in the parish, now no longer insulated, is celebrated as having given shelter to Alfred the Great in his retreat from the Danes; and a small obelisk with a commemorative inscription, has been erected on the spot by the owner of the land. Here, about 888, Alfred founded a Benedictine abbey, which he dedicated to Our Saviour and St. Peter, and the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, amounted to £209. 0. 3¼.; many architectural remains, bones, and other relics have been dug up on the site of the buildings, which appear to have been extensive and magnificent. A fair is held on the second Monday in August. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 8. 4.; patron and impropriator, Hill Dawe, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £85, and the vicarial for £36; the glebe comprises 30 acres. The church is an ancient structure. A district church has been erected at Boroughbridge.

Lingarths

LINGARTHS, a township, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 5¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Huddersfield; containing 801 inhabitants. The township comprises 526a. 36p., the property of the Earl of Dartmouth, who is lord of the manor; the surface is hilly, affording good moorland pasture, and the substratum abounds with stone of excellent quality for building and paving. The village is small, the surrounding scenery pleasing, and the township contains part of the village of Slaithwaite, in which most of the population reside.

Lingen (St. Michael)

LINGEN (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Presteign, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Presteign; containing 285 inhabitants. It is situated in the northern part of the county, near the borders of Radnorshire, and comprises 2283 acres; the road from Presteign to Ludlow intersects the parish, which is watered by a branch of the river Lug. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £70; patrons, the Trustees of the late Rev. Thomas Wynn. There are some vestiges of an ancient religious house.

Lingfield (St. Peter and St. Paul)

LINGFIELD (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of East Grinstead, First division of the hundred of Tandridge, E. division of Surrey, 6 miles (S. S. E.) from Godstone; containing 1866 inhabitants. The parish is separated from the county of Kent by the river Eden, and comprises by measurement 9008 acres, of which 4000 are arable, 4000 meadow and pasture, and 1008 woodland. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patron and impropriator, Robert Ladbroke, Esq. The church, which was founded by Reginald, Lord Cobham, in the reign of Henry VI., consists of a nave, aisles, and chancel, with a tower surmounted by a spire at the west end of the south aisle, and is in the early English style; in the interior are some curious monuments, and several brasses. In the 9th of Henry VI., Lord Cobham had licence to make the church collegiate; he built the college at the westend of the churchyard. At the Dissolution the revenue was valued at £79. 15. 10.; the buildings remained till about the time of George I., when they were pulled down, and a farmhouse was built on part of the ground. There are places of worship for Baptists and Independents. At Starborough was a castle, which was fortified and embattled in the reign of Edward III. by Reginald, Lord Cobham, grandfather of the above Lord Cobham, and was garrisoned by the parliament during the civil war, shortly after which it was demolished; the moat, which remains, forms a handsome sheet of water to the present mansion, erected by Sir James Burrow, and considerably enlarged by Sir Thomas Turton. On part of the site of the castle, Sir James built a large room, over some of the ancient vaults, with the stones on the spot: from the top, which is embattled, is a fine view of the surrounding country. In Plaistowstreet, near the church, is an obelisk of stone of two stories.

Lingwood (St. Peter)

LINGWOOD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blofield, E. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (W. S. W.) from Acle; containing 473 inhabitants. It comprises 661 acres, of which the surface is well wooded, and of pleasing character. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £55; patron, the Rev. E. Goddard, whose tithes, as impropriator, have been commuted for £256. 15. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. The population includes 102 persons in the union workhouse here.

Link, The, or Malvern-Link

LINK, THE, or Malvern-Link, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Leigh, union of Martley, Lower division of the hundred of Pershore, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 7 miles (S. W.) from Worcester, on the right of the road to Malvern; containing about 900 inhabitants. This place is beautifully situated in a champaign country, in the south part of the parish, and under the celebrated Malvern hills: stone is quarried for building. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Worcester; net income, £100, with a house. The church, for which the site and £500 were given by Earl Somers, is in the early English style, with a campanile turret, and is dedicated to St. Matthias; it was completed in 1845, at a cost of £1700. There is a chapel belonging to Lady Huntingdon's Connexion; also a national school.

Linkenholt (St. Peter)

LINKENHOLT (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Andover, hundred of Pastrow, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 7¾ miles (S. E.) from Great Bedwin; containing 109 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 0. 5.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. M. Colson, LL.B., whose tithes have been commuted for £168, and who has a glebe of 41 acres.

Linkinhorne (St. Mellor)

LINKINHORNE (St. Mellor), a parish, in the union of Liskeard, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall, 4 miles (N. W.) from Callington; containing 1525 inhabitants. It comprises 6000 acres, of which 800 are common or waste. On Caernadon or Carraton downs, in the parish, Charles I. drew up his forces in 1644, the day after he had entered Cornwall; and here he was joined by Prince Maurice. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13; net income, £312; patron, the Rev. C. T. Kempe; impropriators, W. Cawsey and J. T. Coryton, Esqrs. Here are the remarkable rocks called the Cheese-wring and the Hurlers, and also Sharp Tor, from which is a very fine view. A free school was founded, and endowed with the interest of £705, by Charles Roberts; it is now conducted upon the national system.

Linley (St. Nicholas)

LINLEY (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Madeley, liberty of the borough of Wenlock, S. division of Salop, 4¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Bridgnorth; containing 111 inhabitants. The living is a rectory not in charge, united to that of Broseley.

Linmouth

LINMOUTH, a township, in the parish of Woodhorn, union of Morpeth, E. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 7¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Morpeth; containing 31 inhabitants. This township, which comprises about 300 acres, derives its name from its situation near the influx of the river Line into the ocean. In 1240, John, son of Robert Rue, held the place by military service; and in the 11th of Edward III. the Countess of Pembroke conveyed it to John de Denton, burgess of Newcastle; since which date, possessions have been held by various families, including those of Eure, Horsley, Watson, Atkinson, and Bradford. In 1822, a spermaceti whale 61 feet in length, and 37 feet in circumference, came on shore at the mouth of the river, and was harpooned; it produced 9 tuns and 158 gallons of oil, which were claimed by the admiralty as a droit of the crown.

Linop, Northumberland.—See Ingram.

LINOP, Northumberland.—See Ingram.

Linsheeles

LINSHEELES, a township, in the parish of Hallystone, union of Rothbury, W. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 11¼ miles (W. by N.) from Rothbury; containing 98 inhabitants. It is situated on the south side of the river Coquet, at the confluence of the Redlees burn, and about a mile and a half west from Alwinton.

Linslade (St. Mary)

LINSLADE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Leighton-Buzzard, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Leighton-Buzzard; containing 883 inhabitants. This place in the reign of Henry III. belonged to William de Beauchamp, to whom, in 1251, that monarch granted the privilege of a market on Thursday, and a fair on Lady-day to continue for eight days. A holy well here was the resort of numerous pilgrims, till, in 1299, they were prohibited by Oliver Sutton, Bishop of Lincoln, who summoned the vicar for having encouraged the practice for his own emolument. The parish comprises by computation 1648 acres, of which 660 are arable, 853 pasture, and 32 woodland: the Grand Junction canal and the London and Birmingham railway pass through it. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £65; patron and impropriator, W. Pulsford, Esq.

Linstead (St. Peter and St. Paul)

LINSTEAD (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Faversham, hundred of Teynham, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 3 miles (S. E.) from Sittingbourne; containing 1050 inhabitants. It comprises 1806a. 2r. 2p., of which about 1260 acres are arable, 200 pasture, 200 wood, and the rest orchards, gardens, &c. A fair for horses and cattle is held at Greenstreet, in the parish, on May 1st. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 3. 11½.; net income, £216; patron, the Archdeacon of Canterbury. Bartholomew Fowle, the last prior of St. Marie Overie, was a native of this place, and received from it the additional name of Linstead.

Linstead Magna (St. Peter)

LINSTEAD MAGNA (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 4¾ miles (W. by S.) from Halesworth; containing 92 inhabitants, and comprising 1286 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with a portion of the tithes; patron, the Rev. E. Holland; impropriator, Lord Huntingfield. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £315, and those of the perpetual curate for £82. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with a square embattled tower.

Linstead Parva, or Lower Linstead (St. Margaret)

LINSTEAD PARVA, or Lower Linstead (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 3¼ miles (W.) from Halesworth; containing 205 inhabitants. It comprises 554 acres, of which 31 are common or waste. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with a portion of the tithes, which have been commuted for £77. 10. payable to Lord Huntingfield, and £48 payable to the curate, whose total net income is £86; patron, the Rev. J. Sprigge. The church is in the later English style, and contains a curiously sculptured font.

Linstock

LINSTOCK, a township, in the parish of Stanwix, union of Carlisle, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland, 2½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Carlisle; containing 220 inhabitants. Here was a castle, which, till 1229, was the only palace of the see of Carlisle. About 1293, Bishop Halton entertained in it Johannes Romanus, Archbishop of York, with a suite of 300 persons, during his visitation; and in 1307, Edward I. kept his court here for six days. The edifice was repaired and modernised in 1768; the ancient square tower is still remaining. A little north-eastward of Linstock is Drawdykes Castle, originally erected with the materials of the Roman wall, which crossed its site, and partially rebuilt in the seventeenth century, by John Aglionby, Esq., recorder of Carlisle, who placed on the battlements three Roman stone busts, which yet remain: this ancient seat is now a farmhouse.

Linthorp

LINTHORP, a township, in the parish of Middlesborough, union of Stockton-upon-Tees, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 1½ mile (S. S. W.) from Middlesborough; containing 246 inhabitants. This township, which comprises 1300 acres, is situated on the river Tees, and includes the hamlet of Ayresham, and the modern village of Newport. It forms a part of the manor of Acklam, and as the lands here are not mentioned in Domesday book, they may be presumed to have been included under the survey of that place. On the river is a ferry, with a wharf having extensive granaries: the road between Stockton and Guisborough lies to the south.

Linthwaite

LINTHWAITE, a chapelry, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Huddersfield; containing 2710 inhabitants. The chapelry consists of the chief part of the township of Linthwaite, and a small portion of that of South Crossland. The township of Linthwaite is on the Huddersfield and Manchester road, between the two branches of the river Colne; and comprises by computation 1300 acres. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the numerous factories established for the manufacture of woollen-cloth, which is carried on to a great extent; and there are several large quarries of stone for building and other purposes. Facility of conveyance is afforded by the Manchester canal, which passes through the township. The chapel, now a district church, dedicated to Christ, was erected in 1828, at an expense of £3000, raised by subscription, aided by the Parliamentary Commissioners; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire, and contains 800 sittings, of which 200 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Almondbury, with a net income of £150; impropriators, the Governors of Clitheroe grammar school. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.



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