Liversedge - Llangibby

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

119-121

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'Liversedge - Llangibby', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 119-121. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51113 Date accessed: 15 September 2014.


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Liversedge

LIVERSEDGE, a township, in the parish of Birstal, union of Dewsbury, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 9 miles (S. W.) from Leeds; containing 5988 inhabitants. This place was anciently the property of the Neville family, lords of the manor, of whose mansion, Liversedge Hall, there are still some slight remains. During the disturbances that prevailed in the manufacturing districts, in 1812, a mill at Rawfolds, in the township, was attacked by a party of Luddites, but was vigorously defended by its proprietor, Mr. William Cartwright; two of the assailants were killed in the conflict, and several severely wounded. None of the attempts of that misguided party, for the demolition of property at this place, were attended with success; and in testimony of the spirited conduct of Mr. Cartwright, the sum of £3000 was raised by general subscription, and presented to that gentleman. The township includes the hamlets of Millbridge, Littletown, Hightown, the Heights, and Robert-Town; it is situated on the acclivities of an extensive valley, watered by a stream flowing towards the south-east through Heckmondwike, and comprises by measurement 2044 acres. Heald's Hall, for many years the seat of the late Rev. Hammond Roberson, is a handsome mansion in the Grecian style, in an ample and tastefully embellished demesne. Millbridge is on the road from Leeds to Huddersfield, with Littletown to the north-west; and both, like other villages of the township, are inhabited by persons employed in the manufacture of blankets, carpets, woollencloths, and machine-cards. There are two coal-mines in Robert-Town, of which place the inhabitants are principally colliers. A church, dedicated to Christ, was erected in 1816, by the Rev. H. Roberson, at an expense of £7000, and endowed by him with 5 acres of land; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, and contains 700 sittings, of which 100 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patron, the Vicar. A neat parsonage-house, in the Elizabethan style, has been erected by subscription, as a testimony of respect to the founder and late incumbent. In the thriving village of Robert-Town, the first stone of a church was laid in April, 1844, and the edifice was consecrated in November, 1845; it was built partly by the Church Commissioners: the living is in the Vicar's gift. There are three places of worship for Wesleyan Methodists.

Liverton

LIVERTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Easingtonin-Cleveland, union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 7½ miles (E. by N.) from Guisborough; containing 203 inhabitants. This place, which at the time of the Domesday survey was a barren and unprofitable waste, was granted by the Conqueror to Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, from whose descendants it passed, through the family of Thweng, to the Latimers, Willoughbys, and others; it is now chiefly the property of Viscount Downe, who is lord of the manor. The chapelry comprises 2393 acres, of which a very considerable portion is high moorland. The village is situated about midway between the sea and the road from Whitby to Guisborough, and consists chiefly of houses irregularly scattered along the edge of a common. The advowson belonged to the priory of Guisborough, to which it was given by Henry Fitzconan. The chapel is a small ancient structure, with a well-preserved Saxon arch.

Livesey

LIVESEY, a township, in the parish, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Blackburn, N. division of Lancashire, 1¼ mile (S. W.) from Blackburn; containing 1996 inhabitants. This place gave name to a family who resided here, and were owners of the greater part of the township. James Levesey, in the reign of Edward VI. held the estate as a manor, as did his descendant, James Levesey, in the 9th of James I.: the family has become extinct within memory. The township is separated from Blackburn by the river Darwen, over which, at Ewood, is an aqueduct of one arch for the Leeds and Liverpool canal. Here are considerable works connected with the cotton manufacture. The Wesleyans have a place of worship, erected in the year 1828.

Llanarth (St. Trillo)

LLANARTH (St. Trillo), a parish, in the union, and partly in the hundred, of Abergavenny, but chiefly in the hundred of Raglan, county of Monmouth, 3¼ miles (N. W.) from Raglan; containing 669 inhabitants, of whom 330 are in the hamlet of Clytha. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Usk, and intersected by the road from Monmouth to Abergavenny. It comprises by computation 3161a. 2r. 33p., of which 1446 acres are arable, 1640 meadow and pasture, and 74 woodland; the surface is undulated, and the views, especially from the Clytha hills, are very fine. Llanarth Court, the admired seat of John Jones, Esq., is a handsome and spacious mansion, the front ornamented with an elegant portico resembling that of the temple of Pæstum. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the living of Bettws-Newydd annexed, valued in the king's books at £10. 3. 4., and in the patronage of the Bishop, Archdeacon, and Chapter of Llandaff, who are the appropriators: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £211, and there is a glebe of about 62 acres, with a good parsonage-house, nearly rebuilt within the last few years by the vicar, the Rev. W. Price. The church, an ancient structure, consists of a nave and chancel, with a lofty embattled tower surmounted by pinnacles. A Roman Catholic chapel, richly decorated with ancient and modern stained glass, is attached to Llanarth Court. On the summit of Clytha Hill is an intrenchment, which retains marks of having been strongly fortified; and near Llanarth is a tumulus.

Llanbadock (St. Madocus)

LLANBADOCK (St. Madocus), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 1 mile (W. S. W.) from the town of Usk; containing 457 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5. 8. 9.; net income, £72; patron, the Rev. T. A. Williams; impropriator, the Duke of Beaufort. There is a Roman Catholic chapel.

Llancillo (St. Peter)

LLANCILLO (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Dore, hundred of Ewyaslacy, county of Hereford, 14½ miles (S. W.) from the city of Hereford; containing 84 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the southeast by the river Munnow, which divides it from Monmouthshire; and comprises 983 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £105; patron and incumbent, the Rev. James Morris.

Llandegveth (St. Thomas)

LLANDEGVETH (St. Thomas), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division of Caerleon, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 3½ miles (N. by E.) from the town of Caerleon; containing 131 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 4. 9½., and in the gift of W. A. Williams, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £120, and the glebe comprises 29 acres.

Llandenny (St. John)

LLANDENNY (St. John), a parish, in the division and hundred of Raglan, union and county of Monmouth, 4 miles (N. E.) from Usk; containing 375 inhabitants. The parish is on the right bank of the river Ebwy, and comprises about 2470 acres, of which 820 are arable, 1641 pasture and meadow, and 9 woodland; the surface is undulated, and from the higher grounds some fine views are obtained. When Fairfax, in the parliamentary war, attacked Raglan Castle, he made Cefyn Tillau, in this parish, his head-quarters. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5. 15. 5.; net income, £50; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Beaufort, whose tithes have been commuted for £330. The church is ancient. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.

Llandevaud

LLANDEVAUD, a chapelry, in the parish of Llanmartin, union of Newport, Lower division of the hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5; income, £40; patron, the Prebendary of Warthacwm in the Cathedral of Llandaff. The chapel is in ruins, and the inhabitants attend Llanmartin church.

Llandevenny

LLANDEVENNY, a hamlet, in the parish of St. Bride Netherwent, poor-law union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth; containing 51 inhabitants.

Llandinabo (St. Dinebo)

LLANDINABO (St. Dinebo), a parish, in the union of Ross, Upper division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 6½ miles (N. W.) from Ross; containing 62 inhabitants. It consists of 484 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 18. 6½., and in the gift of Kedgwyn Hoskins, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £130.

Llandogo (St. Dochoe)

LLANDOGO (St. Dochoe), a parish, in the division of Trelleck, hundred of Raglan, union and county of Monmouth, 9 miles (N.) from Chepstow; containing 660 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the right bank of the Wye, comprises by measurement 1773 acres, whereof 103 are arable, 540 meadow and pasture, 900 woodland, and 20 common; the surface is diversified with hills. The manufacture of paper gives employment to about 100 persons. In 1826, a handsome iron bridge of one arch was erected here over the river, thus connecting the counties of Monmouth and Gloucester; and the parish is intersected by the high road from Chepstow to Monmouth, which passes along the vale of the Wye. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £72; patron, the Prebendary of Caire in the Cathedral of Llandaff. The tithes have been commuted for £168; the incumbent has a glebe of 20 acres, and a comfortable parsonage-house. The church is an ancient structure, consisting of a nave, chancel, and north aisle. A church was erected at the hamlet of Whitebrook, in 1835, by subscription; it is a neat edifice in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Llanellen (St. Helen)

LLANELLEN (St. Helen), a parish, in the division of Pont-y-Pool, union and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 2½ miles (S.) from Abergavenny; containing 342 inhabitants. The river Usk, which flows on the north and east, is here crossed by a handsome bridge of three arches, on the road from Abergavenny to Pont-y-Pool; and the Brecon and Monmouthshire canal proceeds through the parish, from north to south Llanellen includes a portion of the Blorenge mountain The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with" a moiety of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £8. 10. 7.; net income, £105; patron, C. K. Tynte, Esq.: impropriators of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, the trustees of the free grammar school of Abergavenny.

Llanfoist (St. Faith)

LLANFOIST (St. Faith), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 1½ mile (S. W. by S.) from Abergavenny; containing 1500 inhabitants. This parish is bordered on the north by the river Usk, and intersected by the road from Abergavenny to Merthyr-Tydvil; it abounds with coal, ironstone, and limestone, and the produce is chiefly forwarded to the Blaenavon iron-works, in the parish of Llanover. There are also quarries of good building-stone, of which large quantities are sent to Abergavenny and Hereford. The Brecon and Abergavenny canal, which communicates with the Monmouth and Newport canal near Pont-y-pool, passes through the parish; as does also the tram-road from Hereford. The parish includes the greater portion of the Blorenge mountain, 1720 feet high; along the brow proceeds a tram-road, and down the centre are four inclined planes, passing over the Abergavenny canal, to the village of Llanfoist, where are extensive limekilns. From the summit of the mountain the views are extremely beautiful. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 4½., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the glebe comprises 30 acres, with a small parsonagehouse, and the tithes have been commuted for £280. The church is an ancient structure. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Llangarran (St. Deinst)

LLANGARRAN (St. Deinst), a parish, in the union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Ross; containing, with the townships of Kilreague, Llangunnoc, Langstone with Tre-Evan, Trecilla, Tredoughan, and Tretilla, 1175 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 5448 acres of land, and is intersected by the Garran river; the substratum affords stone of good quality for building. The living is annexed, with the livings of Little Dewchurch, Hentland, and St. Weonard's, to the vicarage of Lugwardine: the appropriate tithes have been commuted for £699. 4. 6., and the vicarial for £289. 11. 6.; the glebe contains 4 acres.

Llangattock (St. Cadocus)

LLANGATTOCK (St. Cadocus), a parish, in the union of Newport, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth; containing, with the market-town of Caerleon, 1440 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 5½.; net income, £296; patrons and appropriators, the Bishop and Chapter of Llandaff. The church is partly early English.

Llangattock-Llingoed (St. Cadocus)

LLANGATTOCK-LLINGOED (St. Cadocus), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 6 miles (N. E.) from Abergavenny; containing 203 inhabitants. The parish comprises by estimation 1391 acres, of which 461 are arable, 889 pasture and meadow, and 41 woodland; the surface is moderately undulated, and portions of the higher grounds present exceedingly fine views. There are some quarries of stone, which is raised for building and for the roads. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the gift of the Crown, endowed with the great tithes, and valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 5½.; net income, £172: the glebe comprises 17½ acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure.

Llangattock-Nigh-Usk (St. Cadocus)

LLANGATTOCK-NIGH-USK (St. Cadocus), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 3¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Abergavenny; containing 171 inhabitants. The road from Abergavenny to Monmouth passes through the parish, which is bounded on the south by the river Usk. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 7. 3½., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £215, and the glebe comprises 95 acres. The church is ancient.

Llangattock-Vibon-Avel (St. Cadocus)

LLANGATTOCK-VIBON-AVEL (St. Cadocus), a parish, in the division and hundred of Skenfreth, union and county of Monmouth, 4 miles (N. W.) from Monmouth; containing 503 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 4120 acres, and is situated on the old road from Monmouth to Abergavenny. It presents a fertile tract of land, richly wooded, and abounding in beauty and variety of scenery; the surface is undulated, and the higher grounds command fine views of the distant mountains. Stone of good quality, suitable for roads and for farm-buildings, is quarried. Petty-sessions are held on the first Monday in the month, at Newcastle, in the parish, for the Skenfreth division. The Hendre is a handsome brick and Bath-stone mansion, a mixture of the Norman and Tudor styles, picturesquely situated. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of St. Maughan's annexed, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 11½.; patron, Jervan Perry, Esq.; impropriators, the representatives of the late T. Phillips, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £168, and the vicarial for £209; the glebe comprises 5½ acres. The church is an ancient structure. There is a chapel of ease at Llanvanner. In the hamlet of Newcastle is a mound, the site, it is supposed, of a castle from which the place took its name; it is surrounded by a moat 300 feet in circumference, and near it is a remarkable old oak, the girth of which is nine yards at a few feet from the ground.

Llangeview (St. David)

LLANGEVIEW (St. David), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 1 mile (E.) from Usk; containing 187 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 1500 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £81; patron, incumbent, and impropriator, the Rev. J. Blower. The church is an ancient structure. An almshouse was founded and endowed for 12 people, at Coedcwnnwr, by Roger Edwards, who also bequeathed several sums for distribution among the poor generally.

Llangibby (St. Cuby)

LLANGIBBY (St. Cuby), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division of Caerleon, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 2¼ miles (S. by W.) from Usk; containing 535 inhabitants. It is memorable as the scene of a sanguinary battle between the Britons and the Saxons: a great number of the latter were slain; and the place near which the battle occurred is still, in memory of the event, called Graig Saisson. The parish comprises 4443a. 3r. 19p.; about 1805 acres are arable, 2137 pasture, and 462 woodland. The surface, near the river Usk, which skirts the parish on the east, is level, but the land rises in gentle undulations in other parts, commanding views of the Bristol Channel; the scenery is finely embellished with wood. The soil in some parts is a rich loam, and in others clay, alternated with lighter mould; the substratum abounds with limestone, which is burnt for manure, and there are some quarries of sandstone. The petty-sessions for the division are held in the village, alternately with Panteague. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 10. 10., and in the gift of W. A. Williams, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £504. 7. 6., and the glebe comprises 75 acres. The church is in the early English style. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. Sir Roger Williams, Knt., distinguished in the reign of Elizabeth; and Sir Trevor Williams, Bart., whose valiant defence of his castle at Llangibby is on record; were both natives of the parish.