Llangoven - Llantrissent

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

121-124

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'Llangoven - Llantrissent', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 121-124. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51114 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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Llangoven (St. Goven)

LLANGOVEN (St. Goven), a parish, in the division of Trelleck, hundred of Raglan, union and county of Monmouth, 3¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Raglan; containing 136 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the old road from Monmouth to Usk, comprises by computation 1889 acres, and exhibits some very elevated ground, with other portions boldly undulated, the views from the former being exceedingly fine. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Pen-y-Clawdd annexed, valued in the king's books at £3. 7. 1., and having a net income of £120; it is in the patronage of the Bishop, Archdeacon, and Chapter of Llandaff, the appropriators, whose tithes have been commuted for £170. The church is of considerable antiquity, with a tower.

Llangua (St. James)

LLANGUA (St. James), a parish, in the union of Dore, divison and hundred of Skenfreth, county of Monmouth, 11 miles (N. E. by N.) from the town of Abergavenny; containing 99 inhabitants. The parish is separated from Herefordshire by the river Munnow; it consists of about 700 acres, and is intersected by the tramway from Abergavenny to Hereford. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 15. 10., and in the gift of J. L. Scudamore, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £77. 14. The church is an ancient structure. A cell of Black monks here, subordinate to the abbey of Liu, in Normandy, was annexed at the dissolution of alien monasteries to the establishment at Sheen, in Surrey.

Llangunnoc

LLANGUNNOC, a township, in the parish of Llangarran, poor-law union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford; containing 71 inhabitants.

Llangunnoc (St. Cynog)

LLANGUNNOC (St. Cynog), a parish, in the union of Chepstow, division of Trelleck, hundred of Raglan, county of Monmouth, 8 miles (E. N. E.) from the town of Usk; consisting of about 200 acres. The living of this ancient parish is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Jesus College, Oxford, to which the impropriation belongs: the church is in ruins.

Llangwym (St. Hierom)

LLANGWYM (St. Hierom), a parish, in the union of Chepstow, division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 3½ miles (E.) from the town of Usk; containing 350 inhabitants, of whom 41 are in the Higher, and 309 in the Lower, division. The parish consists of 3420 acres; and comprises some elevated, and more of moderately undulated, ground. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 16. 8.; net income, £83; patron, the Prebendary of Llangwym in the Cathedral of Llandaff.

Llanhennock (St. John the Baptist)

LLANHENNOCK (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Caerleon, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 1¾ mile (N. E. by N.) from the town of Caerleon; containing 235 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £64; it is in the patronage of the Chapter of Llandaff, the appropriators, whose tithes have been commuted for £150: the glebe contains 3½ acres.

Llanhileth (St. Iltyd)

LLANHILETH (St. Iltyd), a parish, in the union and division of Pont-y-Pool, hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 11 miles (W. by N.) from Usk; containing 662 inhabitants. It comprises 1750 acres, of which 124 are common or waste land. Coal is obtained in the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 15. 7½., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £22 to an impropriator, and £75 to the rector; the glebe comprises 85 acres.

Llanishen (St. Denis)

LLANISHEN (St. Denis), a parish, in the division of Trelleck, hundred of Raglan, union and county of Monmouth, 7 miles (S. S. W.) from Monmouth; containing 307 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the old public road, about midway between Monmouth and Chepstow; and comprises by computation 1374 acres, of which 600 are arable, 712 pasture and meadow, 22 woodland, and the remainder roads or waste. There are numerous stone-quarries; the produce is of excellent quality, and is used for building and paving. The cottagers live in substantial tenements with a portion of land attached, for which they pay a small annual acknowledgment to the Duke of Beaufort. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £64; patron and impropriator, his Grace, whose tithes have been commuted for £120: the glebe contains 87 acres. The church is very ancient, and belonged to Tintern Abbey. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The rent of 18 acres of land left in 1646, by William Jones, is distributed among aged parishioners.

Llanithog

LLANITHOG, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Dore, Upper division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford; containing 17 inhabitants, and comprising 193 acres.

Llanllowell

LLANLLOWELL, a parish, in the union of Ponty-Pool, division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 1½ mile (S. E.) from the town of Usk; containing 109 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 13. 1½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. A. Williams: the tithes have been commuted for £205. 10., and the glebe comprises 22 acres.

Llanmartin (St. Martin)

LLANMARTIN (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 6 miles (E. by N.) from Newport; containing 162 inhabitants. It comprises 941a. 3r. 24p., of which 401 acres are arable, 396 meadow and pasture, and 106 woodland. The surface is varied; the soil is of a sandy nature, and the substratum affords stone of sufficiently good quality for the roads. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Wilerick annexed, valued in the king's books at £4. 6. 10½.; net income, £208; patron, Thomas Perry, Esq. The tithes of Llanmartin have been commuted for £110, and the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church is in the early English style.

Llanover (St. Bartholomew)

LLANOVER (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the division of Pont-y-Pool, union and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 3½ miles (S. by E.) from Abergavenny, on the road to Pont-y-Pool; containing 3123 inhabitants, of whom 2801 are in the Higher, and 322 in the Lower, division. On the northeast, the parish is bounded by the river Usk; and the Brecon and Monmouthshire canal intersects it from north to south. Its western portion consists of mountainous ground, and its eastern of a highly undulated surface, the former presenting some extensive and pleasing views. The Blaenavon iron-works, and the forges of Wartag, are in the parish; at the former is a chapel, and there is another at Chapel-Nywydd. Llanover Court, the seat of Sir B. Hall, Bart., is a noble mansion of Bath stone, in the Elizabethan style, situated in a small park. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the livings of Mamhilad and Trevethan united, valued in the king's books at £15. 3. 6½., and in the patronage of the Bishop, Archdeacon, and Chapter of Llandaff, the appropriators; net income, £591. The great tithes of Llanover have been commuted for £145, and the small for £247: the vicar has 16 acres of glebe. The church is ancient. There is a place of worship for Independents; also a school endowed by Mrs. Sarah Hopkins with £3000 in the 4½ per cents., and a small farm at Blaenavon, the rent of which is £20 per annum.

Llanrothal

LLANROTHAL, a parish, in the union of Monmouth, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from the town of Monmouth; containing 108 inhabitants. The parish is situated in the southern part of the county, and bounded on the west by the river Munnow, which separates it from Monmouthshire; it comprises 1467 acres, and is boldly undulated. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £3. 15. 5., and in the gift of Joseph Price, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £192, and the glebe consists of 12 acres. The church is an ancient edifice. At a farm called Treged Castle, is the moat of an old fortress.

Llansaintfraed (St. Bride)

LLANSAINTFRAED (St. Bride), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 3¾ miles (S. E.) from the town of Abergavenny; containing 20 inhabitants. The parish comprises by estimation 269 acres, of which 116 are arable, 146 meadow and pasture, and 7 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 13. 11½., and in the patronage of John Jones, Esq.: the glebe consists of 66 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure, most picturesquely situated in the grounds of Llansaintfraed House, which present some fine views.

Llansoy

LLANSOY, a parish, in the union of Chepstow, division of Trelleck, hundred of Raglan, county of Monmouth, 4¾ miles (E. N. E.) from Usk; containing 158 inhabitants. The parish consists by estimation of 1164 acres, of which 768 are arable, 352 pasture and meadow, and 20 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 10. 10.; net income, £170; patron, the Duke of Beaufort. The glebe comprises 14 acres.

Llanthewy-Rytherch (St. David)

LLANTHEWY-RYTHERCH (St. David), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 3½ miles (E.) from Abergavenny; containing 361 inhabitants. It comprises by estimation 2186a. 1r. 10p., of which 1065a. 3r. 36p., are arable, 1051a. 2r. 24p. meadow and pasture, and 62a. 2r. 29p. woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with a moiety of the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £7. 15. 5., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriators of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, the Trustees of the Free school of Abergavenny. The tithes belonging to the vicar have been commuted for £195, and the impropriate tithes for £85; the glebe contains 13a. 1r. 8p., with a glebe-house attached. The church consists of a nave and chancel, with a square tower. The Baptists have a place of worship.

Llanthewy-Skirrid (St. David)

LLANTHEWY-SKIRRID (St. David), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from Abergavenny; containing 105 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Ross to Abergavenny, and contains an area of 1060a. 3r. 35p., whereof 465a. 1r. 23p. are arable, 520a. 3r. 22p. pasture and meadow, and 62a. 3r. 37p. woodland. A considerable portion of the Skirrid mountain, 1490 feet high, is in the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 10. 2½., and in the gift and incumbency of the Rev. M. H. Jones: the tithes have been commuted for £147, and the glebe comprises 109 acres, with a comfortable parsonagehouse. The church, picturesquely situated near Llanthewy Court, was built, with the exception of the tower, in 1828, from the proceeds of a rate.

Llanthewy-Vach (St. David)

LLANTHEWY-VACH (St. David), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division of Caerleon, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 3½ miles (S. W.) from Usk; containing 172 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Jesus College, Oxford, with a net income of £77: the tithes, belonging to the Bishop of Llandaff, have been commuted for £90.

Llanthony

LLANTHONY, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Gloucester, Middle division of the hundred of Dudstone and King's-Barton, adjacent to the city, and in the E. division of the county, of Gloucester. A priory, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. John the Baptist, was founded here in 1136, by Milo, Earl of Hereford, for some refugees from Llanthony Abbey, Monmouthshire, to which it was at first a cell, but of which it afterwards became the superior. At the Dissolution it had a revenue of £748. 19. 11.

Llanthony-Abbey

LLANTHONY-ABBEY, a chapelry, in the Upper division of the parish of Cwmyoy, union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 10 miles (N. by W.) from Abergavenny. This place is distinguished as having been chosen by St. David, uncle to King Arthur, and titular saint of Wales, for his seclusion from the world. Finding here a solitary spot on the banks of the Honddû, among rocks, woods, and valleys, he built a small chapel, and made it a hermitage, where he passed many years, and which was afterwards unfrequented for several centuries: this chapel was called Llan-Dewy-nant-Honddû, or "the church of St. David on the Honddû," now corrupted into Llanthony. In the reign of William Rufus, Hugh de Lacy happening to follow deer into this retreat, William, one of his followers, was impressed with the wild solitude of the scenery, and, espying the chapel of St. David, resolved to devote himself here to the service of God: after passing several years alone, he induced Ernest, chaplain to Queen Maud, wife of Henry I., to become his associate, and by their united efforts another chapel was built, which was consecrated, in 1108, to St. John the Baptist. Soon afterwards, Hugh de Lacy founded a priory of Canons regular of the order of St. Augustine, also dedicated to St. John; and when riches poured in upon the establishment, a more magnificent church was erected. The remains of the abbey, built in the form of a Roman cross, and exhibiting a fine specimen of early English architecture, with some Norman details, are situated in the vale of the Ewyas. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £55; patron, the Bishop of St. David's.—See Cwmyoy.

Llantilio-Cresseny, or Llantilio-Grossenny (St. Teilaw)

LLANTILIO-CRESSENY, or Llantilio-Grossenny (St. Teilaw), a parish, in the division and hundred of Skenfreth, union and county of Monmouth, 7½ miles (W. N. W.) from Monmouth; containing 699 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west and south-east by the river Trothy, and situated on the road from Monmouth to Abergavenny. It comprises about 5480 acres; the soil is chiefly clay, the surface a good deal undulated, and the views are exceedingly fine, especially from the stately ruin of White Castle, which is encompassed by a deep moat, on the crest of an eminence about a mile and a half north-west of the church. Killough, now a farmhouse, was the principal seat of the Powells, or ap Howels; a younger branch of the family resided at Llantilio for about 270 years, and the last descendant was married to Mr. Serjeant Taddy, who has a mansion here. Old Court was the residence of Sir William Thomas, who married the daughter of Sir David Gam, whose services at Agincourt were rewarded by Henry V. with knighthood on the field of battle: Sir David occasionally made this a place of retreat from the vengeance of Owain Glendwr, by whom his castle of Peyton Gwyn, in Breconshire, was burnt to the ground. Remains exist of the moat of Old Court. A farm now called Park Farm, was the red-deer park belonging to Raglan Castle.

The living is a vicarage, with that of Penrose annexed, valued in the king's books at £10. 10. 5., and in the patronage of the Bishop, Archdeacon, and Chapter of Llandaff, the appropriators; net income, £270: there is a small parsonage-house, with a glebe of about 10 acres. The church, which is picturesquely situated on an artificial mound, part of the site of an ancient intrenchment, is a handsome cruciform structure of stone, with aisles, and a chapel on the north side of the chancel; it is chiefly in the early style, and has a tower surmounted by a lofty shingled spire, rising from the intersection of the transepts. In the chapel are several curious tombstones with effigies of the Powell family, and in the chancel are neat monuments to the family of Lewis, especially one by Flaxman to the memory of the lady of Mr. Justice Bosanquet: in the churchyard is a stone cross. A chapel of ease, capable of accommodating 180 persons, was erected by subscription, in 1842, at Llanvair-gil-Coed; where are remains of an ancient castle, and where was a grange belonging to the abbey of Dore, in Herefordshire. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists; also a school endowed with £40 per annum from bequests by James and John Powell, in 1645.

Llantillio-Pertholey (St. Teilaw)

LLANTILLIO-PERTHOLEY (St. Teilaw), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 1¾ mile (N. N. E.) from Abergavenny; comprising the Citra and Ultra divisions, and containing 808 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the road to Hereford, and comprises 6550 acres, of which 950 are common or waste. It is beautifully situated, nearly in the centre of a district surrounded by mountains, the principal of which are the Sugar Loaf to the west, the Great Skirrid or Holy mountain to the east, and the Little Skirrid and Blorenge mountains to the south. A tramroad from Abergavenny to Hereford crosses the parish, through which also flows the Gavenny river. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 3. 9., and in the patronage of the Chapter of Llandaff, the appropriators: the great tithes have been commuted for £370, and the vicarial for £252. 10.; the glebe comprises 66 acres, with a small vicarage-house. The church is an ancient structure, with a square tower on the north side. A small chapel of ease at Bettws, in the parish, has been rebuilt. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Llantrissent (St. Peter, St. Paul, and St. John)

LLANTRISSENT (St. Peter, St. Paul, and St. John), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 2½ miles (S. by E.) from Usk; containing 329 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of Pertholey annexed, valued in the king's books at £6. 8. 9.; present net income, £131; patron, the Rev. R. Davies.