Llanvaches - Load

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

124-126

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'Llanvaches - Load', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 124-126. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51115 Date accessed: 30 October 2014.


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Llanvaches (St. Maches)

LLANVACHES (St. Maches), a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 6 miles (E.) from Caerleon; containing 305 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2107 acres, of which 90 are common or waste land. A castle formerly stood here. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £194; patron, Sir Charles Morgan, Bart. The church has a low square tower.

Llanvair-Discoed (St. Mary)

LLANVAIR-DISCOED (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and division of Chepstow, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 6½ miles (W. by S.) from Chepstow; containing, with the hamlet of Dinham, 186 inhabitants. The parish comprises by estimation 1590 acres of land, of which a considerable portion is lofty undulated ground, whence some fine views are obtained. The living is a perpetual curacy, united to the vicarage of Caerwent; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Llandaff. The church is an ancient structure, and near it are the remains of a castle, supposed to have been erected soon after the Conquest, and which was formerly the property of the family of Kemeys.

Llanvair-Kilgidin (St. Mary)

LLANVAIR-KILGIDIN (St. Mary), a parish, in the division of Pont-y-Pool, union and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Abergavenny; containing 276 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1790 acres, of which about 1100 are arable, 550 pasture and meadow, and 60 woodland. It is intersected by the new road from Abergavenny to Usk, and bounded on the north-west and south-east by the Usk river, over which, at the former point, is a bridge of stone, and at the latter a suspension-bridge. The soil in the lower parts is a sandy loam, and in the upper a red clay; the surface is a good deal undulated, and the views from the higher grounds are interesting. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 1. 10½., and in the gift of Sir Charles Morgan, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £255, and there is a good parsonage-house, with a glebe of about 84 acres. The church consists of a nave and chancel, separated by a carved screen: in the churchyard are some fine yewtrees.

Llanvair-Waterdine (St. Mary)

LLANVAIR-WATERDINE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Knighton, hundred of Purslow, S. division of Salop, 4½ miles (N. W.) from Knighton; containing 603 inhabitants. The parish was a chapelry in Clun, till 1593. It is bounded by the river Teme, by which it is divided from the county of Radnor, and comprises about 7000 acres; the surface is hilly, and the soil generally a light gravel. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £78; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Powis, whose tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £375. The church is a plain building without a steeple.

Llanvanner

LLANVANNER, in the parish of LlangattockVibon-Avel, hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 9 miles (N. W.) from the town of Monmouth. At this place is a chapel of ease, endowed with two farms; they were purchased by grants from Queen Anne's Bounty, and now let for £70 per annum. The chapel is a structure of some antiquity.

Llanvapley (St. Mapley)

LLANVAPLEY (St. Mapley), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 4 miles (E.) from Abergavenny; containing 124 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the old road from Abergavenny to Monmouth, comprises by measurement 819 acres, of arable and pasture land in nearly equal portions; the soil is chiefly clay, producing good wheat, and the surface is considerably undulated. The river Trothy passes on the east. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 5. 2½., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £150, and the glebe comprises 54 acres, with a good parsonage-house. The church is in the early English style. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Llanvetherine (St. James the Elder)

LLANVETHERINE (St. James the Elder), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Abergavenny; containing 212 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the river Trothy, and situated on the road from Ross to Abergavenny. It comprises 2143a. 3r. 13p., of which about 983 acres are arable, 1102 meadow and pasture, and 58 woodland and rough grazing-ground; the substratum contains stone, which is quarried for paving. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 17. 8½., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £300, and the glebe comprises 51½ acres. The church is an ancient structure, consisting of a nave and chancel, with a square tower: in the interior are several tombstones sculptured in bas-relief to the Powell family, and on the outside is a tombstone with a rudely-executed effigy of the patron saint.

Llanveynoe

LLANVEYNOE, a chapelry, in the parish of Clodock, union of Dore, hundred of Ewyaslacy, county of Hereford, 17 miles (W. S. W.) from Hereford; containing 244 inhabitants. It is situated on the eastern side of the Black mountains, between the Munnow and Olchon rivers; and comprises 3510 acres, of which 1279 are common or waste land. The chapel is dedicated to St. Peter.

Llanvihangel-Crucorney (St. Michael)

LLANVIHANGEL-CRUCORNEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and division of Abergavenny, partly in the hundred of Skenfreth, but chiefly in that of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Abergavenny; containing, with the hamlet of Penbiddle, 400 inhabitants. The parish is situated in a valley between the Holy mountain and a portion of the Black mountain, and comprises about 2603 acres, exclusive of gardens, roads, &c.: stone is quarried for roads and buildings. A tramway and the Hereford and Abergavenny road run through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £5. 19. 7., and in the patronage of the Queen; net income, £281; impropriators of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, the governors of Abergavenny school: the glebe contains 40 acres. The church, with the exception of the tower, chancel, and porch, was rebuilt in 1835. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Llanvihangel-Llantarnam (St. Michael)

LLANVIHANGEL-LLANTARNAM (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Caerleon, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Caerleon; containing 780 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron, E. Blewitt, Esq., who, and the family of Wood, are impropriators: the great tithes have been commuted for £90, and those of the incumbent for £101. Here was a Cistercian abbey, the revenue of which was valued at the Dissolution at £71. 3. 2.

Llanvihangel-Juxta-Rogiett (St. Michael)

LLANVIHANGEL-JUXTA-ROGIETT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Chepstow, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 7½ miles (S. W. by W.) from the town of Chepstow; containing 44 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 550 acres; the soil is composed of a gravelly loam and clay, and there are quarries of limestone. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 9. 4½., and in the gift of Sir C. Morgan, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £123; the glebe contains 9 acres. The church is in the early English style, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a square embattled tower; at a former period, it had a north aisle, as is apparent from the arches now filled up in the wall, on the north side of which two coffin-lids were discovered a few years since, one displaying the sculptured effigy of a man, in bas-relief, and the other that of a Knight Templar.

Llanvihangel-Near-Usk (St. Michael)

LLANVIHANGEL-NEAR-USK (St. Michael), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 4 miles (S. E. by S.) from Abergavenny; containing, with the parish of Llansaintfraed, 123 inhabitants. The river Usk flows on the south; and the parish is intersected by the road from Monmouth to Abergavenny, and by the new road from Usk to Abergavenny. It contains by estimation 354 acres, of which 151 are arable, and 203 pasture and meadow. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 8. 9., and in the gift of Sir Samuel Fludyer, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £82, and there is a glebe of 26 acres. The church was rebuilt, and consecrated in Sept. 1847. Here is a place of worship for Calvinists.

Llanvihangel-Pont-Y-Moile (St. Michael)

LLANVIHANGEL-PONT-Y-MOILE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and division of Pont-yPool, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 5 miles (W. by N.) from the town of Usk; containing 202 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Abergavenny to Pont-y-Pool, and comprises 1651a. 1r. 6p. Facilities of supply are afforded by the Brecon and Abergavenny canal, which passes through the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £87; patron and impropriator, Capel Hanbury Leigh, Esq.

Llanvihangel-Tor-Y-Mynydd (St. Michael)

LLANVIHANGEL-TOR-Y-MYNYDD (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Chepstow, division of Trelleck, hundred of Raglan, county of Monmouth, 6½ miles (E. by N.) from Usk; containing 197 inhabitants. This parish, which forms a portion of a mountainous district, comprises 1080 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 15. 5., and in the gift of the Archdeacon of Llandaff: the tithes have been commuted for £108. 10., and the glebe contains about 11½ acres.

Llanvihangel-Ystern-Llewern (St. Michael)

LLANVIHANGEL-YSTERN-LLEWERN (St. Michael), a parish, partly in the hundred of Raglan, and partly in the division and hundred of Skenfreth, union and county of Monmouth, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Monmouth; containing 153 inhabitants. It is situated on the old road from Monmouth to Abergavenny, and comprises by estimation 1814 acres, of which 900 are arable, 650 meadow and pasture, and 264 woodland. The surface is agreeably diversified with hill and dale; the soil is a stiff clay, producing good wheat. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 8. 4., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £200, and the glebe contains about 80 acres, with a small parsonage, now a farmhouse. The church is an ancient structure. The Baptists have a place of worship. In 1735, the Rev. R. Thomas left a cottage, and 5 acres of land, for the instruction of poor children.

Llanvrechva

LLANVRECHVA, a parish, in the union of Pont-yPool, hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 2 miles (N.) from Caerleon; containing 1591 inhabitants, of whom 892 are in the Lower, and 699 in the Upper, division. The parish comprises 4183 acres, of which 210 are common or waste. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £85; patrons and appropriators, the Chapter of Llandaff, who receive a rent-charge of £348. 3. in commutation of tithes: the curate's glebe contains six acres.

Llanwarne (St. John the Baptist)

LLANWARNE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Ross, Upper division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 7 miles (N. W. by W.) from Ross; containing 377 inhabitants. It comprises 2399 acres, and is situated near the eastern base of Saddlebow Hill, whence issues the small river Garran: the Hereford road intersects the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the patronage of the Governors of Guy's Hospital. The following rent-charges are paid in commutation of tithes, viz.: to an impropriator, £106; to the rector, £339; to the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol, £11; and to the vicar of Much Dewchurch, £6. 6. There is a glebehouse, with half an acre of land.

Llanwenarth (St. Peter)

LLANWENARTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 2¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Abergavenny; containing 2582 inhabitants, of whom 256 are in the Citra, and 2326 in the Ultra, division. The parish comprises 3300 acres, of which 800 are common or waste. It is situated in the north-western part of the county; and includes the Sugar-loaf, rising to an elevation of 1852 feet, the Craig, and other hills, forming conspicuous objects at a considerable distance, and in several parts of the principality of Wales. The river Usk, the roads from Brecon to Merthyr-Tydvil, and the Brecon and Monmouthshire canal, intersect the parish. At Carn-y-Denis, coal and iron works have been established. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 6. 3.; patron, the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes for Llanwenarth Citra have been commuted for £460, and the glebe consists of 45 acres. The church exhibits many indications of great antiquity. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Llanwern (St. Mary)

LLANWERN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 3¼ miles (S. E.) from Caerleon; containing 15 inhabitants. It comprises 707 acres by measurement. The surface is irregular, about half of the parish being high and hilly ground, and the other half level; the soil is very fertile, and limestone is quarried for building and for burning into lime. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 0. 10., and in the gift of Sir Charles Salusbury, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £82. 8.; the glebe comprises 16½ acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style.

Llanyblodwell (St. Michael)

LLANYBLODWELL (St. Michael), a parish, in the hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from Oswestry, on the road into Wales; containing 961 inhabitants. It comprises 4676a. 3r. 32p., about two-thirds of which are arable, and the remainder pasture, with the exception of about 100 acres of common, and nearly the same quantity of woodland; the soil is clay and gravel. The small meandering river Tannat, famed for its trout, flows through the parish; and Offa's Dyke bounds it on the east. Limestone of the finest quality is extensively quarried in the hills of Porthywaen and Crickheath, which, with the hill of Llanymynech, form the beautiful valley in which the village is situated, and commence the range of wild and rugged scenery extending to the stupendous Berwyn, in North Wales. Copper and lead ore abound, though no regular mines of either seem to have been wrought since the time of the Romans, of whose works there are considerable traces in this and the adjoining parishes. In the township of Llynclys, a name derived from Llyn, a lake, and Llys, a palace, is a lake of extraordinary depth, covering seven or eight acres, and surrounded by striking scenery. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 1., and in the gift of the Bishop of St. Asaph: the great tithes have been commuted for £201, and the vicarial for £34. 12.; there is a glebe-house and the vicar's glebe contains 20 acres. The church, a plain structure, with a small wooden turret rising from the west end, contains handsome monuments to the Bridgeman and Godolphin families. Moreton chapel, a brick edifice, was built and endowed, as is supposed, by an ancestor of the Earl of Bradford.

Llanymynech (St. Agatha)

LLANYMYNECH (St. Agatha), a parish, partly in the hundred of Chirk, county of Denbigh, North Wales, but chiefly in the hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Oswestry; the English portion containing 566 inhabitants. Here commences the principal limestone range of North Wales, originating in an abruptly precipitous elevation of 900 feet, and extending northward through the country. In the rocks are found sulphate and carbonate of lead, copper, zinc of superior quality, and a green dusty ore of copper, called by the miners "copper malm." Great quantities of limestone are burnt, and calamine is procured in abundance. The curious ancient mining level here, called the "Ogo," consists of caverns of unequal form and dimensions, connected by veins of ore which serve as guides to the miners. A branch of the Ellesmere canal from Frankton reaches to this place, where it joins the Montgomeryshire canal; and a railway has been formed, extending from the limestone-rocks for nearly two miles and a half, and communicating with these canals, the latter of which crosses the river Vyrnwy by an aqueduct. Offa's Dyke passes through the parish, near the church, to the precipitous rock above noticed, and thence towards Oswestry. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 13. 4.; net income, £394; patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph.

Llwyndû

LLWYNDÛ, a hamlet, in the parish, poor-law union, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth; containing 168 inhabitants.

Llwyntidman

LLWYNTIDMAN, a township, in the parish of Llanymynech, hundred of Oswestry, N. division of the county of Salop, 5¾ miles (S. by W.) from Oswestry; containing 545 inhabitants. The tithes of this township and of Trepenal, which are the only portions of the parish in Shropshire, have been commuted for £214, and there is a glebe of about 14 acres.

Load

LOAD, a chapelry, in the parish and hundred of Martock, union of Yeovil, W. division of the county of Somerset, 4½ miles (S. S. W.) from Somerton; containing 426 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene. The navigable river Yeo, or Ivel, is here crossed by a bridge.

Load

LOAD, a hamlet, in the parish of Long Sutton, union of Langport, hundred of Somerton, W. division of Somerset; containing 14 inhabitants.