Martindale - Marwell

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

269-271

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'Martindale - Marwell', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 269-271. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51138 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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Martindale

MARTINDALE, a chapelry, in the parish of Barton, West ward and union, county of Westmorland, 8 miles (S. S. W.) from Penrith; containing 198 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises by measurement 3542 acres of inclosed land, of which 966 are arable, 2480 pasture, and 96 wood; there is also a tract of common, of about 4600 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £43; patron and impropriator, John de Whelpdale, Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for an annual rent-charge of £22. A free school has an endowment of £13 a year.

Martinhoe (St. Martin)

MARTINHOE (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Barnstaple, hundred of Sherwill, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 14 miles (N. E. by N.) from Barnstaple; containing 236 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2425 acres, of which 1265 are common or waste land. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 10. 10.; net income, £109; patron, the Rev. John Pyke.

Martinscroft, Lancaster.—See Woolstone.

MARTINSCROFT, Lancaster.—See Woolstone.

Martinsthorpe (St. Martin)

MARTINSTHORPE (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Martinsley, county of Rutland, 3½ miles (N.) from the town of Uppingham; containing 8 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 0. 5.; patron, the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes have been commuted for £118. The church is in ruins.

Martlesham (St. Mary)

MARTLESHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, hundred of Carlford, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (S. by W.) from Woodbridge; containing 510 inhabitants. It comprises 2559 acres, of which 32 are common or waste land: the navigable river Deben forms the eastern boundary. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 18. 9., and in the gift of F. G. Doughty, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £420, and the glebe comprises 13 acres.

Martley (St. Peter)

MARTLEY (St. Peter), a parish, and the head of a union, in the Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 7½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Worcester; containing, with the hamlet of Hillhampton, 1354 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4382 acres, of which two-thirds are arable and the remainder pasture, with a good portion of plantation and coppice; the surface is rather hilly, and the views from several parts are peculiarly fine. The Teme forms the southern boundary, and the vale through which the river flows is remarkably fertile, and produces hops of the finest quality: the district also abounds with luxuriant orchards of apple and pear trees. There is a quarry of limestone, which forms an excellent material for the roads, and of which great quantities are burnt into lime. The village is on elevated ground, is of pleasing appearance, and contains several respectable dwelling-houses. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £22. 10.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. James Hastings: the tithes have been commuted for £767, and the glebe consists of 90 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure with a tower; it was repewed and a gallery added in 1829, at a cost of £400. An estate producing £59 per annum, left as an endowment for a grammar school, is applied to the support of a national school. New schools have just been erected in the pointed style, at a cost of £1300, of which Lord Ward gave £300, and the family of Hastings a considerable sum also. The union of Martley comprises 28 parishes or places, containing a population of 13,117. The noble conical elevation of Berrow Hill has two lines of intrenchment round its brow; which shew it to be the site of an ancient camp: these remains seem to have been first described by Mr. Allies in his Antiquities of Worcestershire.

Martock (All Saints)

MARTOCK (All Saints), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Martock, W. division of Somerset, 4½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Ilchester, and 130 (W.) from London; containing, with the hamlets of Ash, Bower-Hinton with Hurst, Coat, Milton, Stapleton, and Witcombe, and the chapelry of Long Load, 3025 inhabitants. The name of this place is said to be derived from mart and oak, the market having been formerly held under an oak-tree in the centre of the town, the site of which is now occupied by an elegant fluted column, in imitation of the pillar of Trajan at Rome. The manor was given by James I. to Lord Monteagle for his assistance in detecting the gunpowder plot; the site of the ancient manor-house is still called the Moat. The town consists principally of one street, about a mile and a half in length, and is intersected by a small stream tributary to the river Parret. The manufacture of fine gloves is carried on to a considerable extent, being the chief occupation of the females; and some hand-looms are employed in weaving sailcloth. There is a fair on Aug. 21st; and a court leet is held in October, by the lord of the manor. The parish comprises by measurement 7150 acres; the surface is pleasingly varied, and in many parts picturesque. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 10., and in the gift of the Treasurer in the Cathedral of Wells: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £316. The church is an elegant structure in the later English style, with a lofty square embattled tower, and the walls are surmounted by a handsomely perforated parapet; the roof of the nave is richly groined, and in the chancel is a beautiful window, partly concealed by an altar-piece of modern date. There is a chapel of ease at Load, and a church has been erected at Ash. The Independents have two places of worship. The old Roman Fosse-way skirts the south-east boundary of the parish; and there are some remains of ancient religious houses.

Marton

MARTON, a township, in the parish of Whitegate, union of Northwich, First division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Northwich; containing 675 inhabitants. It comprises 2280 acres, of a sandy soil.

Marton

MARTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Prestbury, union and hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Congleton; containing 307 inhabitants. The manor was given to an ancestor of the Davenport family, as a dowry with the daughter of Venables, Baron of Kinderton, in the reign of Henry I. The grand serjeantry of Macclesfield forest, with the right to levy heriots over that hundred, was attached to it; and when a moiety was alienated a few years previously to 1700, £3700 were paid in order to re-purchase it. The township comprises 1445 acres, of a sandy soil. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £48; patron, E. D. Davenport, Esq. The chapel, a rude building of wood, with a chancel and spire of more modern date, had a chantry, which is said to have been founded in the reign of Edward III., by Sir J. Davenport and his son, of whom there are two recumbent figures in armour in the cemetery.

Marton

MARTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Poulton, union of the Fylde, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of Lancashire, 2 miles (S. E.) from Blackpool; containing 1562 inhabitants, of whom 935 are in Great, and 627 in Little, Marton. This place is mentioned in the Domesday survey under the name of Meretun, or "the town of the mere," and is chiefly remarkable for its moss and mere. Adam de Merton occurs in the Testa de Nevill as holding land here, and the Walters and Botilers or Butlers were anciently proprietors; the Fleetwoods subsequently became possessed of the estates of the Butlers in Great Marton. In the 4th of Edward III., Little Marton was held in trust for the convent of Furness by William de Cokerham, and at the dissolution of monasteries it appears to have passed to the Holcrofts. The estate, with other estates in Lytham, was purchased of Sir John Holcroft by the Clifton family, in 1606; and the whole of Little Marton, and the larger part of Great Marton, now belong to Thomas Clifton, Esq., of Lytham Hall. The moss extends about six miles in length from north to south, and one mile and a half in breadth. The mere was formerly very extensive, and a stream issuing from it turned the wheel of a watermill situated beyond the present windmill in Great Marton: the right of fishery on this lake was the subject of legal contest in the reign of Edward III. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £120; patron, the Vicar of Poulton. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £506, and the vicarial for £84. The chapel, dedicated to St. Paul, was erected in 1801. A free school was founded in 1717 by James Baines, who endowed it with lands now producing £84 per annum; and a boys' and two girls' schools are supported.

Marton (St. Margaret)

MARTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5¾ miles (S. by E.) from Gainsborough; containing 523 inhabitants, and comprising 1180 acres. This parish, which is situated on the river Trent, has communication with the towns on that river, and a considerable trade is carried on in the import and export of corn, timber, coal, lime, and other articles. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; net income, £115; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln: the impropriation belongs to Mr. Hindley. The tithes were commuted for land in 1770; the glebe comprises 70 acres, and there is a glebe-house. The church is an ancient structure, with a tower, and combines various Norman details with others of later date. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists; and a national school supported partly by subscription. The Roman Tilbridge-lane passes through the parish.

Marton

MARTON, a township, in the parish and hundred of Chirbury, S. division of the county of Salop; containing 289 inhabitants.

Marton (St. Esperit)

MARTON (St. Esperit), a parish, in the union of Rugby, Southam division of the hundred of Knightlow, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4¾ miles (N. by W.) from Southam; containing 324 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Coventry to Oxford, at the confluence of the rivers Itchen and Leame; and comprises 1009a. 2r. 21p. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 14. 8., and has a net income of £160; the patronage and impropriation belong to Mrs. Knightley. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1802; the glebe consists of 116 acres. The church is ancient. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Marton, with Sewerby.—See Sewerby.

MARTON, with Sewerby.—See Sewerby.

Marton

MARTON, a township, in the parish of Swine, union of Skirlaugh, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 9½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Hull; containing 119 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 950 acres, chiefly the property of the Constable family: the village, which is scattered, stands on a lofty ridge, a little south of the Lambwith stream. There is a Roman Catholic chapel.

Marton (St. Cuthbert)

MARTON (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 6 miles (E. S. E.) from Stockton-on-Tees; containing 410 inhabitants. This place was formerly the property of the Bruces, who at one time held under the Conqueror; and among the subsequent owners of land mention occurs of the nuns of Basedale: a considerable portion of the soil was also possessed by the priests connected with the cell of Middlesborough; and of more recent proprietors may be named the families of Lowther, Ramsden, and Rudd. The parish is in the district of Cleveland, and comprises 3436 acres, of which rather more than 2000 are arable, 150 woodland and plantations, and the remainder meadow and pasture. In the northern extremity of the parish the surface is nearly level, but towards the south the grounds rise by an easy ascent, and become varied and uneven; the soil is fertile, chiefly consisting of a clayey loam. The village, which was once of greater extent, is pleasantly seated on the road from Yarm to Redcar. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 18. 9.; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York: the great tithes have been commuted for £541. 16., the vicarial for £137. 15., and the glebe comprises 5 acres. The church contains a neat tablet to the memory of Capt. Cook, the great circumnavigator, who was born in the parish, 27th October, 1728. There are places of worship for Wesleyans.

Marton

MARTON, a township, in the parish of Sinnington, union and lythe of Pickering, N. riding of York, 4¾ miles (W. by S.) from Pickering; containing 240 inhabitants. It comprises about 640 acres, belonging to various owners: the village is seated in the picturesque valley of the small river Seven.

Marton, with Grafton

MARTON, with Grafton, a parish, in the Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Boroughbridge; containing 514 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1198a. 1r. 20p.: the soil is fertile, producing wheat, barley, and beans, and there is some turnip and grass land; the substratum is chiefly gravel, of good quality for the roads. The village is situated between the roads from York and from Wetherby to Boroughbridge, a short distance from each, and nearly adjoining the village of Grafton. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Grafton annexed, valued in the king's books at £2. 19. 4½.; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of St. John's College, Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for £288. 14.; and the vicarial for £28, with a glebe of 106 acres, and a glebe-house. The church is in the early English style, with a square embattled tower. There are places of worship for Methodists.

Marton (St. Peter)

MARTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 5½ miles (W. by S.) from Skipton; containing 381 inhabitants. This parish, which includes the villages of East and West Marton, with the hamlet of Marton Scars, comprises about 2310 acres. The soil is of moderate quality, and in meadow and pasture; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque. The substratum is limestone, which is quarried for building and for repairing the roads, and of which great quantities are sent by the Leeds and Liverpool canal to Leeds and Lancaster. Marton Hall, the ancient residence of the Heber family, is now the property of R. H. Roundell, Esq. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 4. 4.; patron, Mr. Roundell: the tithes have been commuted for £59, and the glebe consists of 120 acres. The church, situated in the village of East Marton, is an ancient structure with a square embattled tower. A free school was founded by the Heber family, in 1755, and endowed with 17 acres of land. There is a spring strongly impregnated with sulphur. Reginald Heber, an eminent divine, and father of Bishop Heber, was born at Marton Hall, and was at one time rector of the parish.

Marton-in-the-Forest

MARTON-IN-THE-FOREST, a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 5¾ miles (E. by S.) from Easingwould; containing, with the hamlet of Moxby, 173 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to that of Farlington. A priory of Augustine canons and nuns, the latter of whom soon after removed to Moxby, was founded here in honour of St. Mary, by Bertram de Bulmer, who lived in the reigns of Stephen and his successor; the revenue at the Dissolution was £183. 2. 4.

Marton-Le-Moor

MARTON-LE-MOOR, a chapelry, partly in the parish of Topcliffe, and partly in that of Kirby-onthe-Moor, wapentake of Hallikeld, N. riding of York, 3½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Boroughbridge; containing 212 inhabitants. It comprises about 940 acres of land. The village is situated a little to the west of the Leeming-Lane, and a short distance north of the road from Boroughbridge to Ripon. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Topcliffe, and has a net income of £72. The tithes have been commuted for £370 payable to the impropriators, £48. 10. to the vicar of Topcliffe, £18 to the vicar of Kirby, and £14. 2. 6. to the Dean and Chapter of York; there is a glebe of 12 acres.

Marton, Long (St. Margaret)

MARTON, LONG (St. Margaret), a parish, in East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from Appleby; containing, with the townships of Brampton and Knock, 804 inhabitants, of whom 303 are in Long Marton township. The village is one of the most considerable in the county, and presents a neat appearance. Marton House, a handsome stone edifice situated at its northern extremity, is occupied by the principal agent to the London Lead Company, whose mining office is here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 15. 7½.; net income, £673; patron, the Earl of Thanet. The tithes were commuted for land, under acts of inclosure, in 1804 and 1815. The church is a large edifice. A place of worship for Wesleyans was erected in 1816.

Martyr-Worthy.—See Worthy, Martyr

MARTYR-WORTHY.—See Worthy, Martyr.

Marwell, or Merewell

MARWELL, or Merewell, a hamlet, in the parish of Carisbrooke, liberty of West Medina, Isle of Wight division of the county of Southampton, 1¼ mile (S.) from Newport. A college of four priests was founded here by Henry de Blois, Bishop of Winchester, and augmented by two of his successors.