Moorhouse - Morebath

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

340-342

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'Moorhouse - Morebath', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 340-342. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51158 Date accessed: 16 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Moorhouse

MOORHOUSE, a township, in the parish of Burghupon-the-Sands, union of Carlisle, Cumberland ward, E. division of Cumberland, 4½ miles (W. by N.) from the city of Carlisle; containing 293 inhabitants. There is a meeting-house for the Society of Friends.

Moorhouse

MOORHOUSE, a township, in the parish and union of Houghton-le-Spring, N. division of Easington ward and of the county of Durham, 3½ miles (N. E.) from Durham; containing 45 inhabitants. In the seventeenth century this township was the seat, in succession, of the families of Ingleby and Roper. It lies on the extreme western verge of the parish, near the river Wear, and comprises by measurement 220 acres, of which 140 are arable, 68 grass, and 12 wood: the few houses are convenient to the road from Durham to Sunderland.

Moorhouse

MOORHOUSE, a chapelry, in the parish of Laxton, or Lexington, union of Southwell, South Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 3¼ miles (S. S. E.) from the town of Tuxford; containing 77 inhabitants. The chapel is a small ancient edifice.

Moorlinch (St. Mary)

MOORLINCH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of Whitley, W. division of the county of Somerset, 7 miles (E.) from Bridgwater; containing 2281 inhabitants, of whom 331 are in the hamlet. This parish, which is situated on the Bath and Exeter road, comprises by measurement 1083 acres; the substratum consists of a blue and white lias, of excellent quality for building, and well adapted for mantel-pieces and other ornamental uses. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £440; patron and incumbent, the Rev. R. J. Luscombe; impropriators, Mr. Gould, Mr. Sherston, and the Rev. Mr. Baker. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style. At Stawell and Sutton-Mallet are chapels of ease, of similar character; and at Burtle, Catcott, and Chilton-on-Poldon with Edington, are separate incumbencies: the living of Burtle is in the gift of the Bishop of Bath and Wells, with an income of £50. There are places of worship for Independents. A cell to the abbey of Glastonbury was maintained here.

Moorsholm or Moorsham

MOORSHOLM, or Moorsham, a township, in the parish of Skelton, union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Guisborough; containing, with Girrick, 316 inhabitants. Moorsham Magna and Parva, which now together form the township, were anciently two distinct manors, and at the time of the Domesday survey, wherein the places are styled Morehusum, were held by the Earl of Morton; they afterwards came, by grant of the Conqueror, to the family of de Brus, and from them descended to the Thwengs, Lumleys, and others. The name is probably derived from the situation of the township on the border of an extensive moor, over which the road from Whitby to Guisborough now runs. The area of Moorsholm is about 7075 acres, of which 2806 are common or waste land: the village is seated near a mountain rivulet which pursues a winding course northward; and about a mile to the south is Freeburg hill, a detached mountain of conical form, which appears to have been in very ancient times a place for assembling and transacting business of public importance. The tithes have been commuted for £180, payable to the Archbishop of York. There is a meeting-house for dissenters.

Moorside

MOORSIDE, a hamlet, in the parish of Backwell, union of Bedminster, hundred of Hartcliffe with Bedminster, E. division of the county of Somerset; containing 195 inhabitants.

Moorsley

MOORSLEY, a township, in the parish and union of Houghton-le-Spring, N. division of Easington ward and of the county of Durham, 4½ miles (E. N. E.) from the city of Durham; containing 821 inhabitants. This place was anciently called Moreslaw, "the Moorhill," and belonged to the convent of Durham, on the dissolution of which the possessions of the institution in Moorsley passed to the cathedral. The township comprises 588a. 32p., whereof 355 acres are arable, 210 meadow and pasture, and 22 waste: the village lies on a high bare brow, overlooking the vale of Houghton. The Durham and Sunderland railway here joins the Hartlepool railway. A modus of 20d. is paid annually to the rector of Houghton in lieu of hay tithe, and the other tithes have been commuted for £82. 12.

Moorthwaite

MOORTHWAITE, a township, in the parish of Cumwhitton, union of Brampton, Eskdale ward, E. division of the county of Cumberland, 10 miles (S. E. by S.) from Carlisle; containing 75 inhabitants.

Moortown

MOORTOWN, a tything, in the parish of Fivehead, union of Langport, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 24 inhabitants.

Moor-Town

MOOR-TOWN, a township, in the parish of Brandsburton, union of Skirlaugh, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 10 miles (N. E.) from Beverley; containing 34 inhabitants. This place, which derives its name from its situation, anciently belonged to the Moore family, who flourished here at a very early period. The township comprises about 500 acres of land, set out in three farms; the soil of the carrs in the vicinity has the black appearance common to grounds long under water. The river Hull passes on the west, and the road from Brandsburton to Beeford on the east.

Moorwinstow (St. Morvenna)

MOORWINSTOW (St. Morvenna), a parish, in the union and hundred of Stratton, E. division of Cornwall, 7¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Stratton; containing 1050 inhabitants. This parish comprises 7300 acres, of which 730 are common or waste; it is situated at the northern extremity of the county, and is bounded on the west by the Bristol Channel, and on the east by the river Tamar, which, with the Torridge, has its source here. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 10. 10.; patron, the Bishop of Exeter; impropriator, D. Yonge, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £390, and the vicarial for £365; there is a glebe of 70 acres. The church is an interesting structure chiefly in the Norman style, abounding with curious and elegant details; the south porch is a highly-enriched specimen of Norman architecture. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Richard Stanbury, Bishop of Hereford, who died in 1471, and Sir William Adams, an eminent oculist, were natives of Stanbury, in the parish.

Morborn (All Saints)

MORBORN (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Norman-Cross, county of Huntingdon, 2½ miles (N. W.) from Stilton; containing 93 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1123 acres, of which about 600 are arable, and the remainder, with the exception of a small portion of woodland, pasture and meadow; the surface is flat, and the prevailing wood, elm, ash, and oak. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 10½., and in the gift of R. E. Duncombe Shafto, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £164. 14., and the glebe comprises 81½ acres. The church is an ancient structure, partly Norman, and partly in the later English style.

Morchard, Bishop's (St. Mary)

MORCHARD, BISHOP'S (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Crediton, Crediton and N. divisions of Devon, 6½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Crediton; containing 1880 inhabitants. There is a fair for cattle on the Monday after September 8th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £36, and in the gift of R. H. Tuckfield, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £750, and the glebe comprises 50 acres.

Morcott (St. Mary)

MORCOTT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, hundred of Wrandike, county of Rutland, 4¼ miles (E. by N.) from Uppingham; containing 516 inhabitants. It comprises 1248 acres, of which 40 are common or waste; the substratum abounds with limestone and freestone of good quality for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 19. 7., and in the patronage of Mrs. Mary Thorold: the tithes have been commuted for £388, and the glebe comprises 17 acres. The church is a very ancient structure, in the Norman style, with a small spire covered with lead. Here is a place of worship for Baptists. A national school is supported; and there are almshouses for six persons, founded, and endowed with land producing £30 per annum, by George Gilson, Esq., about a century since.

Morden

MORDEN, a parish, in the union of Wareham and Purbeck, hundred of Loosebarrow, Wimborne division of Dorset, 6 miles (N.) from Wareham; containing, with the hamlets of Charborough, Sandford, and Sherford, 1001 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, with the rectory of Charborough annexed, valued in the king's books at £8. 4. 7.; net income, £287; patron and impropriator, J. S. W. Drax, Esq.: the glebe comprises 90 acres. The church is an ancient building, with an embattled tower crowned by pinnacles. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Morden (St. Lawrence)

MORDEN (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Croydon, Second division of the hundred of Wallington, E. division of Surrey, 1 mile (W. S. W.) from Mitcham, and 10 miles (S. W. by S.) from London; containing 685 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded by the river Wandle on the north-east, comprises by measurement 1426 acres; about one-half is arable, and the remainder grass and garden-ground, with a small portion of woodland, and 83 acres of common or waste. There are two tobacco and snuff manufactories. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 11., and in the gift of the Rev. R. S. Garth: the tithes have been commuted for £420, and the glebe comprises 14½ acres. The church, a small brick edifice erected about 1636, has a large window of stained glass, the ancient part of which is said to have belonged to Merton Abbey. Several bequests for education, amounting to about £30 per annum, are applied in aid of a national school; and there are £1000 vested in the three per cent. consols. for the support of a Sunday school.

Morden, Guilden (St. Mary)

MORDEN, GUILDEN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Royston, hundred of Armingford, county of Cambridge, 5½ miles (E.) from Biggleswade; containing 808 inhabitants. The parish appears to have taken the affix to its name from the decoration of the steeple of its church with stripes of gilding. It is recorded that Charles Yorke, son of the first lord Hardwicke, died suddenly while the patent for raising him to the peerage by the title of Baron Morden, taken from this place, was in preparation. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 3. 6.; net income, £170; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Jesus College, Cambridge; appropriator, the Bishop of Ely. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an act of inclosure, in the reign of George III.

Morden, Steeple (St. Peter and St. Paul)

MORDEN, STEEPLE (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Royston, hundred of Armingford, county of Cambridge, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Royston; containing 797 inhabitants. It comprises 3853 acres, of which the far greater portion is arable, and one-fifth part pasture and woodland; the soil is fertile, and the substratum generally chalk and clunch. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 6.; patrons and impropriators, the Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford. The great tithes have been commuted for £704. 10., with a glebe of 201½ acres, and the vicarial tithes for £235, with a glebe of 21½ acres. The church is an ancient and spacious structure, much mutilated, and unsightly from the loss of the steeple, which fell down many years since. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Mordiford (Holy Rood)

MORDIFORD (Holy Rood), a parish, in the hundred of Greytree, union and county of Hereford, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Hereford; containing 595 inhabitants. It is situated at the confluence of the rivers Froome, Lug, and Wye, and comprises 1480a. 6p., of which about 500 acres are arable, 640 meadow and pasture, 170 woodland and coppice, 18 in hop plantations, and 47 in gardens. The substratum abounds with limestone, in which is found a great variety of fossils. The road from Hereford to Gloucester proceeds through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 5½., and in the gift of E. T. Foley, Esq.; the tithes have been commuted for £310, and the glebe contains 3 acres. The church had a wooden spire rising from the centre, which was many years since taken down; a tower was erected in 1814. On Blackbury Hill, within the parish, are some remains of a work called St. Ethelbert's camp.

Mordon, or Morden

MORDON, or Morden, a township, in the parish and union of Sedgefield, N. E. division of Stockton ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 8½ miles (E. by S.) from Bishop-Auckland; containing 161 inhabitants. This place gave name to a resident family, of whom mention occurs in the 14th century; and among other landed proprietors of former times were the Trollops, who ceased to possess any interest in the estate in the reign of James I. The name was perhaps originally Moredun, or "the moorish hill," from the elevation of the place above a marsh. The township comprises 1537 acres, the greater part of which is arable, and of good quality. The village is surrounded with rich low pasture grounds; and to the south, the slow waters of the Skerne and its numerous feeders form the wide morass just referred to. The York and Newcastle and the Clarence railways pass through the township. The tithes have been commuted for £122.

More

MORE, a parish, in the union of Clun, hundred of Purslow, S. division of Salop, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) from Bishop's-Castle, on the road to Shrewsbury; containing 246 inhabitants. It comprises 3534 acres, of which 943 are common or waste land; of the remainder, the arable and pasture are in about equal portions. The surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque and well wooded: the river Onney flows through the parish. Good building-stone is obtained. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 2., and in the gift of R. B. More, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £242, and the glebe contains 18½ acres, with a house. A school is endowed with £5 per annum.

Morebath (St. George)

MOREBATH (St. George), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, hundred of Bampton, Cullompton and N. divisions of Devon, 2¼ miles (N. by W.) from Bampton; containing 466 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3449a. 1r. 8p. Freestone of good quality for building, and also for the roads, is obtained. A fair is held on the last Monday in August. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 8. 9.; patron, T. L. Clarke, Esq.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £115, and the vicarial for £234; the glebe comprises 3½ acres. The church, erected in 1688, contains some neat monuments to the families of Bere and Sayer.



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