Moreby - Morland

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

342-345

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'Moreby - Morland', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 342-345. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51159 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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Moreby, with Stillingfleet

MOREBY, with Stillingfleet, a township, in the parish of Stillingfleet, wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, union, and E. riding, of York, 5¾ miles (S.) from York; containing 418 inhabitants, of whom 56 are in the hamlet of Moreby. The township comprises by computation 2214 acres, of which about 200 are woodland. Moreby Hall, a magnificent mansion in the Elizabethan style, is seated in a fine lawn on the east bank of the Ouse, and surrounded with trees of gigantic growth; it was commenced in 1827 by Henry Preston, Esq., the present owner of the estate, and is of white freestone from the quarries at Park Springs, near Leeds. The tithes have been commuted for £80 payable to the Dean and Chapter of York, and £48 to the vicar of the parish.

Moredon

MOREDON, a tything, in the parish of RodborneCheney, union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Swindon and N. divisions of Wilts; containing 239 inhabitants.

Moreleigh, or Morley (All Saints)

MORELEIGH, or Morley (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Totnes, hundred of Stanborough, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 5½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Totnes; containing 202 inhabitants. It comprises 1392 acres, of which 300 are common or waste. A weekly market and an annual fair were formerly held here. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 8. 1.; net income, £145: patron, Sir H. P. Seale. Within the parish is Stanborough, the site of an ancient fort from which the hundred is named. The parish gives the title of Earl to the family of Parker.

Moresby (St. Bridget)

Moresby (St. Bridget), a parish, in the union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward about Derwent, W. division of Cumberland; containing, with the township of Parton, 1175 inhabitants, of whom 93 are in the township of Moresby, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Whitehaven. It is evident this was the site of a Roman station, from the numerous foundations of buildings, the caverns, and Roman inscriptions, which have been discovered. Horsley thinks that it was Arbeia, where, according to the Notitia, the Numerus Barcariorum Tigritensium was in garrison. The parish is bounded on the west by the Irish Sea. There is an iron-foundry. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 2. 3½.; net income, £105; patron, the Earl of Lonsdale. The church has been rebuilt. A school was endowed by Joseph Williamson, Esq., with lands now producing about £42 per annum.

Morestead

MORESTEAD, a parish, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Winchester, on the road to Bishop's-Waltham; containing 86 inhabitants. It comprises 1318 acres, of which 90 are common or waste. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £157; there is half an acre of glebe.

Moreton

MORETON, a liberty, in the parish of Dinton, union of Aylesbury, hundred of Desborough, county of Buckingham, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from the town of Aylesbury; containing 14 inhabitants. It is situated upon a small tributary of the river Thame.

Moreton, with Alcumlow

MORETON, with Alcumlow, a township, in the parish of Astbury, union of Congleton, hundred of Northwich, S. division of Cheshire, 3 miles (S. W. by S.) from Congleton; containing 148 inhabitants. It comprises 791 acres, the soil of which is partly clay and partly sand. The tithes have been commuted for £123. 10.

Moreton, With Lingham

MORETON, with Lingham, a township, in the parish of Bidstone, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 4 miles (W. by N.) from Birkenhead; containing 330 inhabitants. It comprises 1169 acres, of a clayey soil, and is situated in a dreary flat, close to the shore of the sea; most of it is below high-water mark, and the sea is kept out by embankments, at the expense of the corporation of Liverpool and the landowners conjointly. Robert Vyner, Esq., is proprietor of the whole township, with the exception of about 300 acres belonging to John Ralph Shaw, Esq., of Arrowe Hall.

Moreton (St. Magnus the Martyr)

MORETON (St. Magnus the Martyr), a parish, in the union of Wareham and Purbeck, hundred of Winfrith, Wareham division of Dorset, 8 miles (E. by S.) from Dorchester; containing 294 inhabitants. It comprises 2311 acres, of which 801 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 19. 2., and in the gift of James Frampton, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £262, and the glebe comprises 38 acres. The church was rebuilt by James Frampton, Esq., in 1776.

Moreton (St. Mary)

MORETON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 3 miles (N. by W.) from Ongar; containing 513 inhabitants. The parish is separated from the parishes of Great and Little Laver by a brook which flows into the river Roden at Ongar, and over which a bridge of brick was built by subscription in 1762. The situation is elevated, in many parts commanding extensive and richly-varied prospects. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the gift of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £375, and the glebe comprises 68 acres. The church is a small neat edifice, with a tower of brick surmounted by a shingled spire. The eminent Edmund Calamy, afterwards a nonconformist, was rector here.

Moreton

MORETON, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Thornbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Thornbury; containing 577 inhabitants. It is situated near the road to Berkeley.

Moreton

MORETON, a chapelry, in the parish of Llanyblodwell, hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, 3¼ miles (S.) from Oswestry. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £669; patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £190, and £21 are paid to the vicar of Oswestry. The chapel is dedicated to St. Michael, and is supposed to have been erected by an ancestor of the Earl of Bradford's. Here is a mineral spring.

Moreton

MORETON, a township, in the parish of Colwich, S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, union, and N. division of the county, of Stafford, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Rugeley; containing 42 inhabitants. It contains a few scattered houses, and lies about a mile north of the village of Colwich. Moreton House is a modern brick mansion, on a lofty eminence.

Moreton

MORETON, a township, in the parish of Gnosall, union of Newport, W. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Newport. It lies on the road from Shiffnall to Stafford, and comprises 3478 acres, of which the soil is various, a good deal of it being sandy; the scenery is prettily diversified with hills and woodlands, and the views are extensive: there are quarries of stone for building. In the township are the hamlets of Coley, Bromstead, Wilbrighton, Outwoods, and Chatwell, extending between two and four miles south-west of Gnosall, and bordering upon Shropshire: Chatwell, the most distant hamlet, is said to have its name from St. Chad's Well, formerly in some repute. A church, now a district church, dedicated to St. Mary, and in the Norman style, was erected under the auspices of the late Bishop Ryder, in 1835, by means of subscription: a parsonage-house, of stone, was built by the late Bishop Butler. The living is in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield. Vaults have been discovered near a farmyard here, which strengthen a traditionary notion that a church anciently existed. A meeting-house for Congregational Dissenters was built by the Rev. George Burder, author of The Village Sermons. The Ducie family were formerly seated here, and a member of it, Matthew Ducie Moreton, was created Lord Ducie, Baron of Moreton, in 1720; on the death of his successor, without issue, that title became extinct.

Moreton

MORETON, a hamlet, in the parish of Hanbury, union of Burton-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 1 mile (N. W.) from Draycott; containing 34 inhabitants.

Moreton-Corbet (St. Bartholomew)

MORETON-CORBET (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 5¼ miles (S. E.) from Wem; containing 226 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Wellington to Drayton, comprises about 2000 acres; the soil is light and sandy, and a stiff clay, in nearly equal portions. The surface is generally flat, but intersected by a ridge of elevated land, and is watered by the small river Roden, which in its course through the parish turns several mills. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 3. 6., and in the gift of Sir A. Corbet, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £330, and the glebe comprises 39 acres. The church is a neat structure, containing some fine monuments of the Corbet family, whose magnificent mansion here, built in the time of Elizabeth, was burned in the civil war, by a detachment from Cromwell's army stationed at Wem.

Moreton-Hampstead (St. Andrew)

MORETON-HAMPSTEAD (St. Andrew), a market-town and parish, in the union of Newton-Abbott, hundred of Teignbridge, Crockernwell and S. divisions of Devon, 11 miles (W. S. W.) from Exeter, and 184 (W. S. W.) from London; containing 2037 inhabitants. The town is romantically situated on the verge of Dartmoor Forest, and occupies a gentle eminence environed by lofty hills; it consists of several streets. The houses in general are ancient, and built in the cottage style, with thatched roofs. Fifty houses were consumed by fire in 1845. The appearance of the surrounding district is somewhat peculiar, the surface being strewn with fragments of rock, while the barren heights of Dartmoor on the west are strikingly contrasted with the cultivated slopes of land more immediately adjacent to the town. The parish comprises 6512 acres, of which 1766 are common or waste. The woollen-trade was formerly extensive, but only a few blankets and stockings are now made: there are some tanyards, and a rope-manufactory, and in the vicinity are quarries of excellent granite. A market is held on Saturday; and there are great cattle-markets, on Whitsun-eve and the first Saturday in October. Fairs take place on the third Thursday in July and the last Thursday in November, principally for cattle. A new market-house and shambles were built, at the expense of the Earl of Devon, in 1827. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £49. 19. 7.; net income, £401; patron, the Earl. The church occupies the summit of the elevation on which the town is situated, and is an ancient edifice consisting of a nave, aisles, transeptal porch, and chancel, the last being separated from the body by a carved wooden screen. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and Unitarians; and a free school with a small endowment. Some Druidical remains and Roman antiquities have been found in the immediate vicinity of the town.

Moreton-In-The-Marsh (St. David)

MORETON-IN-THE-MARSH (St. David), a market-town and parish, in the union of Shipston-uponStour, Upper division of the hundred of Westminster, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 28½ miles (E. N. E.) from Gloucester, and 83 (W. N. W.) from London; containing 1345 inhabitants. The town is situated in a pleasant valley, and on the road from London to Worcester, which is here crossed by the Roman Fosse-way: the manufacture of linen-cloth furnishes employment to about fifty persons. A railway passes hence to Stratford-upon-Avon, chiefly used for the conveyance of coal. In the reign of Henry III., the abbot of Westminster, lord of the manor, procured a charter for a market, which, though on the decline, is still held on Tuesday; and there are small fairs on March 25th and November 1st. The living is annexed to the rectory of Burton-on-the-Hill: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1821. There is a place of worship for Independents. A national school was endowed in 1813, with £4000, by Lord Redesdale and Dr. Winford; the income is about £140 per annum. On a heath here is a modern pillar, marking the point where the counties of Oxford, Gloucester, and Warwick, and a detached portion of the county of Worcester, unite, and near which a memorable battle was fought between the English and the Danes.

Moreton-Jeffries.—See Morton-Jeffries.

MORETON-JEFFRIES.—See Morton-Jeffries.

Moreton, Maids' (St. Edmund)

MORETON, MAIDS' (St. Edmund), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Buckingham, 1¼ mile (N. E.) from Buckingham; containing 570 inhabitants. It comprises 1260 acres, of which 590 are arable, 650 pasture, and about 20 woodland; the soil is clay, alternated with gravel. The river Ouse, and a branch of the Grand Junction canal, pass through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18 2. 11.; net income, £294; patron, the Rev. J. L. Long. The church, built in 1450 by two maiden sisters, daughters of the last male heir of the family of Peyvre, is a handsome structure in the later English style, containing some stalls highly enriched; the porch and belfry have groined roofs. Dr. George Bate, chief physician to Charles II., was born here.

Moreton, North (All Saints)

MORETON, NORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union and parliamentary borough of Wallingford, hundred of Moreton, county of Berks, 4¼ miles (W.) from Wallingford; containing 397 inhabitants. It comprises 1037 acres, of which 730 are arable, 257 pasture, and about 50 orchard and garden. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 8.; net income, £83; patron, the Archdeacon of Berks; impropriator, J. T. Wasey, Esq. In the south aisle of the church, called Stapleton's chantry chapel, founded before 1467, are two old tombs of ecclesiastics, with processional crosses; also two ancient mutilated tombs, with Saxon inscriptions.

Moreton Sea or Say (St. Margaret)

MORETON SEA or SAY (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Drayton, Drayton division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 3¼ miles (W.) from Drayton; containing 770 inhabitants, of whom 262 are in the township. The parish comprises 4804a. 1r. 30p. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Rector of Hodnet: the appropriate tithes have been commuted for £550, and the incumbent's for £89. 13.; the glebe comprises 48 acres. The church contains a monument to a member of the Vernon family, whose ancient mansion in the parish is now a farmhouse; the first lord Clive was interred here.

Moreton, South (St. John)

MORETON, SOUTH (St. John), a parish, in the union and parliamentary borough of Wallingford, hundred of Moreton, county of Berks, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Wallingford; containing 417 inhabitants. It comprises 1419a. 1r. 22p., of which 878 acres are arable, 370 pasture and meadow, and about 30 woodland; the surface is generally level, and the meadows are watered by a small stream which falls into the Thames at Wallingford. The Great Western railway intersects the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 15. 5., in the patronage of the University of Oxford, in trust for the Principal and Fellows of Magdalen Hall; net income, £199. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1818.

Moreton-Valence (St. Stephen)

MORETON-VALENCE (St. Stephen), a parish, in the union of Wheatenhurst, Upper division of the hundred of Whitstone, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 7¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Stroud; containing 344 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises about 1000 acres, is bounded on the north-west by the river Severn, and the Gloucester and Berkeley canal passes through it. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £90; patron, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £355, and the glebe comprises 40 acres. The church is a neat ancient structure.

Morland (St. Lawrence)

MORLAND (St. Lawrence), a parish, in West ward and union, county of Westmorland; comprising the chapelry of Bolton, and the townships of King'sMeaburn, Morland, Newby, Sleagill, Great and Little Strickland, and Thrimby; and containing 1923 inhabitants, of whom 426 are in the township of Morland, 7 miles (S. E.) from Penrith. The parish comprises by computation 28,000 acres, of which about 500 are woodland, 500 common, and the remainder arable and pasture; the soil is chiefly a red loam, in some parts resting on clay, and in others on limestone. The surface is gently undulated; the river Eden bounds the parish on the east for some miles, and the low grounds are watered by the river Lyvennet and two small streams. Limestone and freestone of good quality are quarried extensively, and an inferior kind of coal is obtained. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 18.; income, £200; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The tithes were chiefly commuted for land in 1779. The church is a large edifice, originally of Norman architecture of the period of Henry II.; the old cross aisles remain, but the chancel was rebuilt about two centuries since in a more modern style, and the body of the church 80 years ago. The townships of Bolton and Thrimby have each a chapel; and there are places of worship for Wesleyans and the Society of Friends. A free school has been endowed by the Dean and Chapter with about 30 acres of common. At Chapelgarth formerly stood a chapel, dedicated to St. Mary; and within the parish are the remains of a monastic building, and several old halls now converted into farmhouses.