Muccleshell - Mundsley

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

356-359

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'Muccleshell - Mundsley', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 356-359. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51163 Date accessed: 22 July 2014.


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Muccleshell

MUCCLESHELL, a tything, in the parish of Holdenhurst, union of Christchurch, liberty of Westover, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 122 inhabitants. It is situated on the southern bank of the river Stour.

Muchall

MUCHALL, a hamlet, in the parish of Penn, union, and N. division of the hundred, of Seisdon, S. division of the county of Stafford, 1½ mile (S. by W.) from Wolverhampton. It lies on the road from Wolverhampton to the village of Penn; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque. Muchall Hall, surrounded with 80 acres of land, is the seat and property of William Thacker, Esq.

Much Birch, county of Hereford.—See Birch, Much.

MUCH BIRCH, county of Hereford.—See Birch, Much.—And other places having a similar distinguishing prefix will be found under the proper name.

Muchelney (St. Peter and St. Paul)

MUCHELNEY (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Langport, hundred of Pitney, W. division of Somerset, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Langport; containing, with the hamlet of Thorney, 349 inhabitants, of whom 62 are in the hamlet of Muchelney-Ham. This place was the site of a Benedictine abbey, said by some to have been founded by Athelstan in 939, and by other writers ascribed to Ina, king of the West Saxons; it was dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, and flourished till the Dissolution, when its revenue was returned at £498. 16. 3. The remains are now converted into a farmhouse called the Abbey. The parish comprises 1558a. 1r. 36p. of land, principally rich meadow subject to inundation from the river Parret: the village is pleasantly situated on the road from Langport to South Petherton. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £93; patron and impropriator, Walter Long, Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for £336. 11., and who has a glebe of 11¼ acres. The church is in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, and has been recently beautified and repewed by the patron.

Mucking (St. John the Baptist)

MUCKING (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 18 miles (E. S. E.) from Romford; containing 199 inhabitants. It is bounded on the east by the river Thames, and comprises 2143a. 2r. 35p., of which 1381 acres are arable, 679 pasture and meadow, and 54 woodland. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £219; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London. The church is an ancient edifice, with a tower of stone surmounted by a shingled spire.

Muckleford

MUCKLEFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of Bradford-Peverell, union of Dorchester, hundred of George, Dorchester division of Dorset, 5¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Dorchester; with 109 inhabitants.

Muckleston

MUCKLESTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Shawbury, union and division of Wem, hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 9¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Shrewsbury; containing 113 inhabitants.

Muckleston, or Muxon (St. Mary)

MUCKLESTON, or Muxon (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Drayton, partly in the Drayton division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, and partly in the N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford; containing, with the townships of Aston, Knighton, Oakley, and Winnington, 1688 inhabitants, of whom 184 are in the township of Muckleston, 4 miles (N. E.) from Drayton. The parish comprises by measurement 8531 acres, whereof 4362 are in Salop; the substratum produces stone of good quality for building, of which some quarries are in operation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 3. 9., and in the gift of the Trustees of Lord Crewe: the tithes have been commuted for £1036, and the glebe comprises 28 acres. The church was rebuilt in 1789, except the tower, from which Queen Margaret is said to have witnessed the battle of Blore Heath. There is an endowed chapel at Woore, in Salop; also a place of worship for Wesleyans in the parish. Several small sums have been bequeathed for education.

Mucklewick

MUCKLEWICK, a township, in the parish of Hyssington, union of Clun, hundred of Chirbury, S. division of Salop; containing 69 inhabitants.

Muckton (Holy Trinity)

MUCKTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of LouthEske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5½ miles (S. E.) from Louth; containing 105 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1027 acres, of which 945 are arable and pasture, and 82 woodland: the surface is diversified, and the soil of a rich quality on the hills, but clayey and not very productive on the level grounds. The living is a discharged rectory, united in 1840 to the vicarage of Burwell, and valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 6½. The tithes have been commuted for £150, and the glebe comprises about 19 acres. The church is modern.

Muddiford

MUDDIFORD, a village, in the parish, union, and hundred of Christchurch, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 1¾ mile (E. S. E.) from Christchurch. This is a fashionable watering-place, situated on the northern bank of the mouth of the river Avon, which here runs into Christchurch bay.

Mudford (St. Mary)

MUDFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Stone, W. division of Somerset, 3 miles (N. N. E.) from Yeovil; containing 436 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 9½.; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Wells; impropriators, W. and O. Heywood, Esqrs. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £322, the vicarial for £225, and £25 are paid to the rector of Ashington; the impropriate glebe contains nearly 41 acres, and the vicarial about one acre.

Mugginton (All Saints)

MUGGINTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Belper, partly in the hundred of Appletree, and partly in that of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 7 miles (N. W.) from Derby; containing, with the townships of Mercaston and Weston-under-Wood, and the hamlet of RavensdalePark, 773 inhabitants, of whom 289 are in the township of Mugginton. The manor, in Domesday book Mogintune, was anciently held under Earl Ferrers, and in the reign of Edward I. was in moieties between the families of Chandos and Stafford. One moiety passed by a female heir to the immediate ancestor of Edward Sacheverell C. Pole, Esq.; and the Staffords' moiety has been successively in the families of Dethick, Rolleston, and Hallowes. The parish comprises 5234 acres, of which 2146 are in Mugginton township; of this latter, the soil is a gravelly marl with some limestone, and about one-third is arable. The village is well built, and pleasantly seated on elevated ground. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 12. 8½.; net income, £465; patron, E. S. C. Pole, Esq., who, and Lord Scarsdale and T. Hallowes, Esq., are impropriators. The church, situated on a commanding eminence, is a large ancient structure, consisting of a nave, chancel, aisles, and tower: the interior has been lately thoroughly renovated; in the chancel is the tomb of Sir Richard Kniveton, who died at Mercaston Hall in 1400. The Rev. Samuel Pole, rector, in 1746, and Mrs. Frances Pole, in 1751, gave land now together producing about £21 a year, for education.

Muggleswick

MUGGLESWICK, a parish, in the union of Lanchester W. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 14 miles (S. W.) from Gateshead; containing 421 inhabitants. This place, anciently Muggesley, was granted by Bishop Pudsey to the convent of Durham in exchange for Hardwick; and in the thirteenth century, Hugh, Prior of Durham, inclosed a park here, with a chapel, hall, and dwellings, and apartments underground for secreting cattle during the incursions of the Scots. The park, now inclosed, was in 1662 the scene of several seditious meetings, at which numerous conspirators had for their object to destroy the reformed clergy. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Derwent, and comprises by computation 5921 acres, whereof 1232 are pasture and meadow, 950 arable, 340 wood, and about 3400 moorland and common; it abounds in game, and the right to shoot is leased by the Dean and Chapter, who are lords of the manor. Along the bank of the river is a range of hills, in which are some very productive mines of lead-ore containing silver, for smelting which there is a mill in the neighbourhood; and at Castle Side, a village whose population is on the increase, are two mills. In the reign of Charles I., Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, held these mines. Cold Rowley, in the parish, is a hamlet on the summit of the bleak heights between the vale of Lanchester and the Derwent. The Stanhope and Tyne railway passes through the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter, the appropriators, and has a net income of £93. The church was rebuilt in 1829, at a cost of £300. Dr. John Carr, the translator of Lucian's Dialogues, was born here.

Muker

MUKER, a chapelry, in the parish of Grinton, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 20 miles (W. by S.) from Richmond; containing 1241 inhabitants. This chapelry, including numerous small hamlets, comprises 30,310a. 3r. 31p., of which 22,472 acres are uninclosed common; of the remainder, 5 acres are arable, 85 wood, 7897 meadow and pasture, and 325 land lately recovered from waste. The district abounds in mineral wealth; and coal, limestone, and lead and iron ore can be obtained, but in consequence of the difficulty of inland carriage, the iron-ore is not wrought. The lands are watered by the river Swale, which, in its course through the chapelry, forms a romantic cataract named Keasdon Force; and there are several pleasing falls also on the Ivelet beck, one of which is from a considerable height. The village, situated in the higher part of Swaledale, is large, and consists chiefly of ancient houses of stone, irregularly built. A customary market is held weekly on Wednesday, and a small fair on the Wednesday before Old Christmasday; also a fair for sheep, at the hamlet of Thwaite, on the 25th of October. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £120; patron, the Vicar of Grinton: there is a parsonage-house. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, is a plain structure, built in 1580. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans in the hamlet of Keld, 3 miles to the west of the village. A national school has an endowment of £20. 10. per annum.

Mulbarton (St. Mary Magdalene)

MULBARTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Henstead, hundred of Humbleyard, E. division of Norfolk, 5½ miles (S. S. W.) from Norwich; containing 582 inhabitants. The parish was consolidated with Keningham in the year 1452, and the whole comprises 1348a. 26p., of which 967 acres are arable, 284 pasture, 38 woodland, and 48 common. The village is pleasantly situated on the road from Norwich to New Buckenham: petty-sessions are held at the inn, on the first Monday in every month. The living is a rectory, with the living of Keningham, valued in the king's books at £14; net income, £606; patron, G. Lucas, Esq.: the glebe comprises 80 acres, with a house, which has been greatly improved. The church was erected by Sir William de Hoo, and is a handsome structure, partly in the early and partly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower; the windows of the chancel have been lately filled with stained glass. There are no remains of the church of Keningham. Sir Thomas Richardson, chief justice of the common pleas, was born here in 1626.

Mullion (St. Melan)

MULLION (St. Melan), a parish, in the union of Helston, W. division of the hundred of Kerrier and of the county of Cornwall, 7 miles (S. by E.) from the town of Helston; containing 808 inhabitants. The parish comprises 5595 acres, of which 2671 are common or waste; it is bounded on the west by Mount's bay, in the English Channel, where is a small cove convenient for fishing, which is the principal employment of the population. Part of Kynan cove is also in the parish; and two miles distant from the village are the soap rocks, producing the celebrated steatite formerly in great repute with the manufacturers of china ware. The scenery around Mullion cove is exceedingly romantic; and the rocks, which are bold and rugged, have an appearance of rude magnificence. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 4.; net income, £178; patron, the Bishop of Exeter; impropriator, the Rev. J. Ustick. The church is an ancient structure, with a lofty tower which forms one of the most conspicuous objects in this part of the county. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Mulwith, with Newby

MULWITH, with Newby, a township, in the parish and liberty of Ripon, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Ripon; containing 41 inhabitants. The township comprises about 800 acres, of a fertile soil, the whole the property of Earl de Grey. The hamlet is situated on the north bank of the river Ure.

Mumby (St. Peter)

MUMBY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (E. S. E.) from Alford; containing, with the hamlets of Elsey and Langham-Row, and the chapelry of ChapelMumby, 786 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 3100 acres, chiefly marsh land, of a clayey soil. The villages of Mumby and Chapel-Mumby are three miles from each other, and the former the same distance from the sea. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 12. 3.; net income, £188; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1804; the glebe comprises 90 acres. The church is partly in the later English style of architecture, and has an elegant south porch of Norman character; also a fine tower. There are places of worship in the parish for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans.

Mumby, Chapel

MUMBY, CHAPEL, a chapelry, in the parish of Mumby, union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7 miles (E. S. E.) from Alford; containing 316 inhabitants. It is situated on the coast. The chapel is dedicated to St. Leonard: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar, with a net income of £80.

Muncaster (St. Michael)

MUNCASTER (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bootle, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland; comprising the town of Ravenglass and the township of Birkby, and containing 602 inhabitants. This place, formerly called Meol-Castre, derives its name from a castle, the ancient residence of the Penningtons, situated at Esk-Meol, near the mouth of the river Esk; the principal tower of the castle is retained in the mansion built by the late Lord Muncaster. The parish comprises 3200 acres, of which 1200 are inclosed; about 1000 acres are arable, and 300 woodland. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £97; patron, Lord Muncaster, whose title of Baron, in the peerage of Ireland, is derived from this place.

Munden, Great (St. Nicholas)

MUNDEN, GREAT (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Ware, hundred of Broadwater, county of Hertford, 2 miles (W. by N.) from Puckeridge; containing, with the hamlet of Munden-Furnival, and part of the hamlets of Dane-End and Haultwick, 477 inhabitants. In the reign of Henry II., a Benedictine nunnery was founded at Rownay, in the parish, and dedicated to St. John the Baptist, by Conan, Duke of Brittany and Earl of Richmond; but falling into decay, it was surrendered in the reign of Henry VI., and its revenues were appropriated to the maintenance of a chantry priest, till the Dissolution, when the income was returned at £13. 10. 9.: there are still some slight remains. The parish comprises by measurement 3300 acres, of which 150 are woodland, 550 pasture, and the remainder arable; the soil is a stiff clay, and the surface undulated. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 9. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £785, and the glebe comprises 76 acres. The church is a neat structure, in the early English style.

Munden, Little (All Saints)

MUNDEN, LITTLE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Ware, hundred of Broadwater, county of Hertford, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Puckeridge; containing, with the hamlet of Green-End, and part of the hamlets of Dane-End and Haultwick, 612 inhabitants. It comprises 2250 acres, of which about 110 are woodland, and the remainder arable and pasture: the soil is a gravelly clay, alternated with chalk, which lies near the surface; the ground is hilly, the scenery finely varied. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the gift of C. Jollands, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £570, and the glebe comprises 72 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Mundford (St. Leonard)

MUNDFORD (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Thetford, hundred of Grimshoe, W. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Brandon; containing 437 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north by the river Wissey, and comprises 2038 acres, of which 200 are common, and the remainder arable and pasture. The road from Thetford to Lynn runs through the parish. Petty-sessions are held every alternate Wednesday. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 6., and in the patronage of Sir Richard Sutton, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £135, and there is a glebe of 49½ acres. The church is built of flint, and has an embattled tower at the west end, with freestone coping and quoins.

Mundham, St. Ethelred and St. Peter

MUNDHAM, St. Ethelred and St. Peter, now forming one parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Loddon, E. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (S.) from Loddon; containing 308 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1550 acres of land. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £125; patrons and impropriators, the Trustees of the Great Hospital, Norwich. The tithes have been commuted for £442, and the glebe contains 2 acres. The church of St. Peter is partly in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower, and a highly-enriched Norman doorway on the south side: the church of St. Ethelred has long been in ruins.

Mundham, North

MUNDHAM, NORTH, a parish, in the union of West Hampnett, hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Chichester; containing, with the hamlets of Fisher and Runckton, 495 inhabitants. The village is in a sequestered spot, abounding with picturesque scenery. The Arundel and Portsmouth canal passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 0. 10.; net income, £269; patron and impropriator, J. B. Fletcher, Esq. The church is in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, and has been enlarged. There was formerly a chapel at Runckton.

Mundham, South

MUNDHAM, SOUTH, a tything, in the parish of Pagham, union of West Hampnett, hundred of Aldwick, rape of Chichester, W. division of the county of Sussex; containing 93 inhabitants.

Mundon (St. Mary)

MUNDON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 3¾ miles (S. E. by S.) from Maldon; containing 309 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north by the navigable river Blackwater, and comprises an area of 3104a. 1r. 27p., of which 1909 acres are arable, 671 meadow and pasture, 56 woodland, and about 467 marsh and waste. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13, and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of the duchy of Lancaster; net income, £160; impropriators, Lord Western, and the family of Whitehead. The church is a small ancient edifice.

Mundsley (All Saints)

MUNDSLEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of North Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from North Walsham; containing 454 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the coast, and comprises by admeasurement 550 acres, of which 530 are arable, and 20 pasture. The scenery is romantic; the coast is girt with lofty cragged cliffs, and indented by a deep ravine, through which a small rivulet discharges itself into the sea. The beach at low water is a broad firm sand, affording excellent opportunities for bathing, and a fine promenade; and within the last twenty years the place has been greatly improved under the auspices of F. Wheatley, Esq., who has built a handsome residence on the cliff near the mouth of the ravine, and two massive sea-walls, forming an upper and lower terrace, to prevent the encroachment of the sea: other villas have been erected, and lodginghouses and a spacious inn for the reception of visiters. Mundsley is a member of the port of Cley, and several vessels are employed: a small jetty projects about 100 feet into the sea. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 9. 9., and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of the duchy of Lancaster: the tithes have been commuted for £168. 14., and the glebe comprises 4 acres. The church, a very ancient structure, for many years an extensive ruin, has been partly restored, and a portion of it fitted up for divine service. There is a place of worship for Baptists.