Newton-Abbot - Newton-Grange

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

407-409

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'Newton-Abbot - Newton-Grange', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 407-409. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51177 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Newton-Abbott

NEWTON-ABBOTT, a market-town and chapelry, and the head of a union, in the parish of Woolborough, hundred of Haytor, Teignbridge and S. divisions of Devon, 14½ miles (S. S. W.) from Exeter, and 187 (S. W. by W.) from London; containing 1192 inhabitants. It is probable that Newton-Abbott and Newton-Bushell were formerly included under the name of Nuietone, and retained this common appellation till the two manors became the property of different possessors. Newton-Abbott was so denominated from its being held by the Abbot of Tor, to whom it was given by William, Lord Brewer, founder of that monastery. The town appears to have possessed a market and a fair in the time of Edward I. In 1625, Charles I. and his suite, when on their way to and from Plymouth, were entertained at Ford House, near the town. In 1688, the mansion was occupied by William, Prince of Orange, after his landing at Torbay; and from the pedestal of the market-cross, on which is an inscription commemorative of the fact, his declaration to the people of England was first read.

The town is situated on the river Lemon, upon the road between Exeter and Plymouth, and consists of two large, and several minor streets; the inhabitants are amply supplied with water from pumps and adjacent springs. The surrounding country is beautifully diversified. Here was formerly an important woollen manufactory: the principal business now is tanning; large quantities of shoes, also, are exported to Newfoundland. The inhabitants carried on a very extensive trade with that colony, but it declined during the war in the beginning of the present century, and, with the exception of the above-named article, has not since been revived. The river Teign is navigable to its junction with the Stover canal, about three-quarters of a mile from the town; lighters and boats come up by this canal from Teignmouth with coal, and return with granite and potters' clay. Here is a station of the South Devon railway. The markets are on Wednesday and Saturday, and on the last Wednesday in February is a great market for cattle: the market-place is spacious, and well arranged. Fairs are held on June 24th, Sept. 14th, and Nov. 9th, unless these fall on Wednesday, in which case the fairs take place on that day week.

A portreeve, reeve, and inferior officers, are annually elected by a jury, at the borough court; the office of portreeve is always filled by the reeve of the preceding year. A court leet is held annually, and a pettysession monthly: the powers of the county debt-court of Newton-Abbott, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Newton-Abbott. The chapel, dedicated to St. Leonard, has been rebuilt, and contains 600 sittings. There are places of worship for Baptists and Independents, the latter of which, with a free school, was founded and liberally endowed pursuant to the will of Mr. Bearne, in 1787. The poor-law union comprises 39 parishes or places, containing a population of 44,358. At Milberdown, near Newton-Abbott, are vestiges of an ancient elliptical encampment with a triple intrenchment, where the Prince of Orange stationed his artillery when on his way from Brixham to Exeter. Hacknield ford, in the neighbourhood, is supposed to have derived its name from its situation on the line of the Roman road called the Ikeneld-way. John Lethbridge, Esq., the inventor of the diving-bell, was a native of Newton-Abbott.

Newton, Archdeacon

NEWTON, ARCHDEACON, a township, in the parish and union of Darlington, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 3 miles (N. W.) from Darlington; containing 63 inhabitants. It comprises 910 acres. The hamlet is on the road from Cockerton to Walworth.

Newton-Arlosh

NEWTON-ARLOSH, a hamlet, in the parish of Holme-Cultram, union of Wigton, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 6¾ miles (N. W.) from Wigton. In consequence of the destruction of Skinburness by an irruption of the sea, in 1404, the abbot of Holme-Cultram was licensed to build a small church at this place, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, and to hold here the market and fair (now disused) which had previously been granted to him at Skinburness. The church, which has long been desecrated, was constructed so as to serve the purpose of a fortress, and its thick rugged walls still remain in the cemetery, which is used by the parishioners.

Newton, Bank.—See Bank-Newton.

NEWTON, Bank.—See Bank-Newton.

Newton-Bewley

NEWTON-BEWLEY, a township, in the parish of Billingham, union of Stockton-upon-Tees, N. E. division of Stockton ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 5½ miles (N. N. E.) from Stockton; containing 87 inhabitants. This township, which belongs to the Dean and Chapter of Durham, was named Newton inreference perhaps to Wolviston, a neighbouring place; and had its addition of Beaulieu, now Bewley, from the circumstance that here was situated the court-house or residence of the prior of Durham within his manor of Billingham. The village is on the road from Wolviston to Greatham. The tithes have been commuted for £154. 3., of which £21. 3. are payable to the vicar.

Newton-Blossomville (St. Nicholas)

NEWTON-BLOSSOMVILLE (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (E.) from Olney; containing 264 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Ouse, and comprises by computation 925 acres, whereof 300 are pasture, 600 arable, and 25 woodland; the soil is various, and the scenery, which partakes of a woodland character, exceedingly beautiful. Some of the inhabitants are employed in making bobbin-lace. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 8. 1½., and in the gift of W. Frederick Farrer, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1810; the glebe altogether comprises 156 acres, valued at £200 per annum. The church consists of a nave, north aisle, and north chancel, with an embattled tower at the west end. A schoolroom was built by the Rev. J. Gould, a former curate, at his sole expense.

Newton-Bromshold (St. Peter)

NEWTON-BROMSHOLD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of HighamFerrers, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3¼ miles (S. E.) from Higham-Ferrers; containing 161 inhabitants. This parish, anciently Newton-Bromswold, is situated on the confines of the county of Bedford, and comprises 800a. 1r. 24p. The females are employed in lace-making. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 3. 4., and in the patronage of All Souls' College, Oxford; net income, £119. The tithes were commuted for 170 acres of land, and a money payment, under an act of inclosure, in the 40th of George III. The church is a small handsome structure.

Newton-Burgoland

NEWTON-BURGOLAND, a hamlet, in the parish of Swepstone, union of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester; containing 244 inhabitants.

Newton-Bushell

NEWTON-BUSHELL, a chapelry, and formerly a market-town, in the parish of Highweek, union of Newton-Abbott, hundred of Teignbridge, Teignbridge and S. divisions of Devon, 14½ miles (S. S. W.) from Exeter. This place received its distinguishing appellation from Robert Bussell or Bushell, foster-child and kinsman of Theobald de English Ville; he was made lord of the manor by Henry III., in 1246, and granted to the inhabitants a charter for a market. The village is separated from Newton-Abbott by a small stream, and contains three tanyards: limestone with argillaceous slate, and organic remains, are found in the vicinity. A portreeve and two constables are annually chosen at the court held by the lord of the manor. The chapel is a large edifice in the ancient English style, with a window highly enriched with tracery. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Newton-By-Castleacre (All Saints)

NEWTON-BY-CASTLEACRE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Swaffham, hundred of South Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 4¼ miles (N. by E.) from Swaffham; containing 93 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north-west by the river Nar, and comprises 1063a. 10p., of which about 940 acres are arable, 60 pasture and meadow, and about 40 common. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £2. 15.; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Ely. The great tithes have been commuted for £210. 5. 9., and the vicarial for £97; the glebe comprises about 2 acres. The church is an ancient structure; it has a low square tower rising from the centre, and over the entrance is a Norman arch.

Newton-By-Chester

NEWTON-BY-CHESTER, a township, in the parish of St. Oswald, Chester, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 1¾ mile (N. N. E.) from Chester; containing 226 inhabitants. It comprises 429 acres, of which the soil is clay. There is a tanyard at Flookersbrook, in the township.

Newton-By-Daresbury

NEWTON-BY-DARESBURY, a township, in the parish and union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Frodsham; containing 193 inhabitants. It comprises 753 acres, of which the soil is chiefly clay. Here is the parsonage-house, with a farmhouse and some land, belonging to the curacy of Daresbury.

Newton-By-Frodsham

NEWTON-BY-FRODSHAM, a township, in the parish of Frodsham, union of Runcorn, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 2¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Frodsham; containing 100 inhabitants. The township comprises 372 acres, of a sandy soil. There is a place of worship for the Society of Friends.

Newton-By-Tattenhall

NEWTON-BY-TATTENHALL, a township, in the parish of Tattenhall, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 5¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Tarporley; containing 86 inhabitants. The township comprises 567 acres, of which the soil is clay; and is intersected by the Crewe and Chester railroad.

Newton-By-Toft (St. Michael)

NEWTON-BY-TOFT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Caistor, N. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Market-Rasen; containing 85 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 960 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 10. 10., and in the gift of Lieut.-Gen. Wilkinson: the tithes have been commuted for £172. 12., and the glebe comprises 21 acres. John Holdsworth, in 1741, bequeathed £200 for teaching children.

Newton-Cap

NEWTON-CAP, a township, in the parish of St. Andrew Auckland, union of Auckland, N. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, ½ a mile (N. W.) from the town of BishopAuckland; containing 148 inhabitants. It is situated on the Wear, which is here crossed by a bridge, and on the north bank of which are the ruins of an unfinished mansion erected by the Bacon family.

Newton, Cold

NEWTON, COLD, a chapelry, in the parish of Lowesby, union of Billesdon, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 9 miles (E. by N.) from Leicester; with 104 inhabitants.

Newton St. Cyres

NEWTON ST. CYRES, a parish, in the union and hundred of Crediton, Crediton and N. divisions of Devon, 3½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Crediton; containing 1234 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4175 acres, of which 270 are common or waste land. Lead-ore and manganese are obtained. A fair for cattle is held on the Monday following Midsummer-day. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 15. 5.; net income, £351; patron, J. Quicke, Esq., who, with Sir S. Northcote, Bart., is impropriator.

Newton-Dixton.—See Dixton, Newton.

NEWTON-DIXTON.—See Dixton, Newton.

Newton, East

NEWTON, EAST, a township, in the parish of Aldbrough, union of Skirlaugh, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 12½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Hull; containing 41 inhabitants. This place, which is situated on the sea-shore, in the reign of Henry III. belonged partly to the abbey of Meaux; since that time the estate has passed through many families. The township comprises 505 acres, and the manorial rights are vested in the several proprietors of land. An hospital in honour of St. Mary Magdalene, was founded here by William, Earl of Albemarle, who died in the year 1179; at the Dissolution, it possessed a revenue of about £40 per annum.

Newton, East, with Laysthorpe

NEWTON, EAST, with Laysthorpe, a township, in the parish of Stonegrave, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 3¾ miles (S. E. by S.) from Helmsley; containing 82 inhabitants. The township comprises 860 acres, and is situated south of the river Rye. The old Hall, now occupied as a farmhouse, was the residence of the celebrated Dean Comber. The tithes have been commuted for £150.

Newton St. Faith

NEWTON ST. FAITH, a hamlet, in the parish of Horsham St. Faith, union of St. Faith, hundred of Taverham, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (N.) from Norwich, upon the road to Aylsham; with 334 inhabitants. On the inclosure in 1802, 68 acres were allotted to the poor. There is a Wesleyan meeting-house.

Newton-Ferrers (Holy Cross)

NEWTON-FERRERS (Holy Cross), a parish, in the union of Plympton St. Mary, hundred of Ermington, Ermington and Plympton, and S. divisions of Devon, 2 miles (S. W. by S.) from Yealmpton; containing 778 inhabitants. It is situated near the coast, and bounded on the west by the estuary of the Yealm: the vicinity is remarkable for scenery of great beauty. The area is 3044a. 3r. 35p. A portion of the population is employed in the fisheries in the neighbourhood. Two very extensive quarries of limestone afford materials for building and for burning into lime, and there are also quarries of sandstone, and schistose slate: in the limestone rock is a cavern, in which have been found the bones and teeth of the hyæna, elephant, and other animals. The estuary is navigable for vessels of 80 tons' burthen. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £41. 12. 1., and in the gift of the Rev. John Yonge: the tithes have been commuted for £429, and the glebe comprises 110 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains three stone sedilia, a piscina, and a double arch of very early date.

Newton-Flotman (St. Mary)

NEWTON-FLOTMAN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Henstead, hundred of Humbleyard, E. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (N. by E.) from Long Stratton; containing 371 inhabitants. This parish received the adjunct to its name from an ancient flote, or ferry, over the river Taus, which is now passed by a bridge of brick. It is situated on the road from London to Norwich, viâ Long Stratton, and comprises 1171a. 2r. 12p., of which 833 acres are arable, 292 pasture, and 46 woodland. The living is a rectory in medieties, united to the rectory of Swainsthorpe, and valued in the king's books at £10: the tithes have been commuted for £362. 7., and the glebe comprises 23 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains memorials of the Blundeville family, and an arched monument with a representation of Noah's Ark. The poor of the parish have the dividends on £173. 17. new 3½ per cent. stock, left by Thomas Clabburn in 1815; and an annual rent-charge of £4, left by John Pye in 1697, out of land now belonging to R. K. Long, Esq.

Newton-Grange

NEWTON-GRANGE, a hamlet, in the parish of Ashbourn, hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (N. by W.) from Ashbourn; containing 39 inhabitants. At the Domesday survey this was one of the manors of Henry de Ferrers, by whose descendant it was given to the abbey of Combermere, in Cheshire; it was granted at the Dissolution to the Cotton family, from whom it passed to the Bentleys. The Beresfords subsequently became possessed of the property, and on the death of Richard Beresford in 1790, it was sold in severalties. The area of the hamlet is 741 acres.



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