Nunney - Nytimber

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

461-463

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'Nunney - Nytimber', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 461-463. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51188 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Nunney (St. Peter)

NUNNEY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Frome, E. division of Somerset, 2¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Frome; containing, with the hamlet of Trudox-Hill, 1185 inhabitants. This place, the name of which has varied with its different proprietors, appears to have derived its permanent appellation from the foundation of a nunnery here, and from its situation on the river Frome. During the civil war, the castle of the De la Meres was garrisoned for the king, but being besieged by the parliamentarians under General Fairfax, was, after an obstinate defence, surrendered to the assailants, and, by order of Fairfax, destroyed by fire. The parish comprises 2800 acres of fertile land, and the scenery is interesting. On the bank of the Frome is a manufactory of agricultural implements and other edged tools, which has been long in distinguished repute. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 9. 4½., and in the gift of Thomas Theobald, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £366. 10., and the glebe comprises 58 acres. The church, an ancient structure, was considerably enlarged in 1820: in the north transept are the tombs of the De la Meres, and other proprietors of the manor. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. On a hill in the neighbourhood are vestiges of a single intrenched Roman camp.

Nunnington (All Saints)

NUNNINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 2 miles (E.) from Oswaldkirk; containing 470 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated in the fertile and picturesque vale of the river Rye, comprises nearly 2000 acres: the surface is boldly undulated, and the scenery beautifully diversified; the higher grounds command extensive views of Ryedale and the adjacent country. The ancient Hall, now belonging to W. Rutson, Esq., was the seat of Lord Preston, and afterwards of Lord Widdrington. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £284. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1776. The church is an ancient structure with a square tower, and contains a monument to a knight templar. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school and an hospital, supported by endowment.

Nunnykirk

NUNNYKIRK, a township, in the parish of Nether Witton, union of Rothbury, W. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 10 miles (W. N. W.) from Morpeth; containing 20 inhabitants. It belonged to the abbots of Newminster, who built a chapel, tower, and other offices here, all traces of which are gone, and which are no where described. The estate was granted in 1610, by the crown, to Sir Ralph Grey, from whose descendants it went to the Wards; it has passed from them to the family of Orde, and is now the property of Charles W. Orde, Esq., having descended to him in 1842 from his uncle William, who rebuilt the mansion in a classic style, and furnished it with great taste and elegance. The house stands at the bottom of a warm valley, with the little river Font a few yards from its site, and embosomed in steep wooded hills. The celebrated racing-stud at this place, which included the farfamed Tomboy and Beeswing, is now dispersed.

Nunriding

NUNRIDING, a township, in the parish of Mitford, union of Morpeth, W. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 4¾ miles (W. by N.) from Morpeth; containing 41 inhabitants. This place, anciently called Baldwineswood, was given by Roger Bertram in the reign of Henry II. to the nuns of the Benedictine convent of Hallystone: the grant is recited in a charter of Henry III., in 1255. After the dissolution of religious houses, the lands came to the Beadnell family, and subsequently to the Fenwicks. The township comprises 599 acres, of which 50 are wood, and the remainder arable; the soil is generally a heavy and unproductive clay. The Hall, erected about a century since, occupies a slope fronting the south.

Nunthorpe

NUNTHORPE, a chapelry, in the parish of Ayton, union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from the town of Stokesley; containing 137 inhabitants. This place derived its name from a Cistercian nunnery founded here in 1162, and subsequently removed to Bayesdale. The manor was anciently a demesne of the crown, and was bestowed by the Conqueror upon Robert de Brus, from whom it descended by marriage to the Thweng family; it was subsequently held by the Percys, Conyers, Bradshaws, and Simpsons. Ralph de Neville, in the reign of Henry II., granted some land, with a mill in the township, to the nunnery he had founded here, which grant was confirmed to the nuns by Henry III., after their removal to Bayesdale: and on the dissolution of the convent, the lands were conferred by the crown upon King's College, Oxford. The chapelry is in the district of Cleveland, and comprises about 1400 acres; the surface is undulated, and the prevailing soil a strong stiff clay. Nunthorpe Hall, the seat of Thomas Simpson, Esq., formerly belonged to the Constable family; whose armorial bearings are still over a door of one of the out-buildings. The village is pleasantly situated on the Ormesby road. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, was rebuilt in 1824, at a cost of £200, and contains 100 sittings: the living is in the joint gift of Thomas Simpson and Thomas Richardson, Esqrs.; income, £46.

Nunton

NUNTON, a chapelry, in the parish and hundred of Downton, union of Alderbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of the county of Wilts, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Salisbury; containing, with the tything of Bodenham, 307 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Andrew.

Nunwick, with Howgrave

NUNWICK, with Howgrave, a township, in the parish and liberty of Ripon, wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. N. E.) from the city of Ripon; containing 35 inhabitants. It is situated on the west bank of the river Ure, and comprises about 640 acres of land. The tithes have been commuted for £19. 1. 6., and there is a glebe of nearly 12 acres. Here were formerly five stones, each eight feet high and twenty feet in girth, inclosing a circular area.

Nursling, or Nutshalling

NURSLING, or Nutshalling, a parish, in the union of Romsey, hundred of Buddlesgate, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (N. W.) from Southampton; containing 958 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Romsey to Southampton, and comprises by measurement 2400 acres, of which 1400 are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the scenery is pleasingly diversified. The lower grounds are watered by the river Test, and a canal from Redbridge to Andover is navigable for coal barges. The mansion of Grove Place, said to have been erected by Queen Elizabeth as a hunting-seat for the New Forest, has a beautiful avenue of lime-trees; it has been lately converted into a lunatic asylum. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 10½.; net income, £425; patron, the Bishop of Winchester. The church has a tower surmounted by a wooden spire, and contains a monument to the Mill family. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Nursted (St. Mildred)

NURSTED (St. Mildred), a parish, in the union of North Aylesford, hundred of Toltingtrough, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 4¼ miles (S. by W.) from Gravesend; containing 36 inhabitants. This place was the property of Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, and furnished one of the knights who accompanied Edward I. into Scotland; the remains of an ancient keep still exist, and part of the old Hall, with its oak roof and windows, is still in tolerable preservation. There are 71 acres of woodland, and the total area is 510 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 15., and in the gift of William Edmeads, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £173. 8. 6.; the glebe comprises 14 acres. The church is a small building with a tower.

Nursted

NURSTED, a tything, in the parish of Buriton, union of Petersfield, hundred of Finch-Dean, Petersfield and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 1½ mile (S.) from Petersfield; with 133 inhabitants.

Nutbin

NUTBIN, a hamlet, in the parish of Weyhill, hundred and poor-law union of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 36 inhabitants.

Nutbourne

NUTBOURNE, a tything, in the parish and union of West Bourne, hundred of Westbourne and Singleton, rape of Chichester, W. division of the county of Sussex; containing 273 inhabitants.

Nutfield (St. Peter and St. Paul)

NUTFIELD (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union, and Second division of the hundred, of Reigate, E. division of Surrey, 1¼ mile (W.) from Bletchingley; containing 872 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Godstone to Reigate, and comprises 3352a. 2r. 33p., of which about 1784 acres are arable, 840 meadow and pasture, and 190 woodland. The soil consists of a sandy loam and deep clay, and fullers'-earth is found in great quantities and of superior quality. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 14. 7.; net income, £500; patrons, the Principal and Fellows of Jesus College, Oxford: the glebe consists of about 90 acres, and there is a handsome glebe-house. The church is partly in the early and partly in the later English style. In 1775, an earthen vessel was discovered, containing 900 coins of the Lower Empire.

Nuthall (St. Patrick)

NUTHALL (St. Patrick), a parish, in the union of Basford, S. division of the wapentake of Broxtow, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 4¼ miles (N. W.) from Nottingham; containing, with the hamlet of Awsworth, 669 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Nottingham to Alfreton, comprises by measurement 1242 acres; the substratum abounds with coal, of which some mines are in operation at Awsworth. Nuthall Temple, occupying a commanding site near the village, is a handsome mansion, built in imitation of the Villa Capra, at Vicenza, in Italy, and surrounded by an extensive park embellished with plantations and an artificial lake. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 14. 9½.; net income, £350; patron, Robert Holden, Esq.: the glebe comprises 51 acres. The church, an ancient edifice with a tower, has been repewed. There is an endowed chapel at Awsworth. Richard Smedley, in 1744, gave some land, directing the income to be applied in teaching twenty children.

Nuthampstead

NUTHAMPSTEAD, a hamlet, in the parish of Barkway, poor-law union of Royston, hundred of Edwinstree, county of Hertford, 2½ miles (E. by S.) from Barkway; containing 289 inhabitants. Here was formerly a chapel.

Nuthill

NUTHILL, formerly a parish, in the poor-law union of Patrington, S. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 8½ miles (E. by N.) from the town of Hull. The living is valued in the king's books at £2, as a rectory; but the church is in ruins, and there is now only one farmhouse, which is assessed with the parish of Burstwick.

Nuthurst (St. Andrew)

NUTHURST (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Horsham, hundred of Singlecross, rape of Bramber, W. division of Sussex, 3¾ miles (S. S. E.) from Horsham; containing 768 inhabitants. The road from Horsham to Worthing runs through the parish on the east. The soil of the lands is light, and well adapted for the growth of oak timber; the wheat raised here is exceedingly fine: hill and dale diversify the surface. Nuthurst Lodge occupies an elevated site commanding extensive views of the Weald and South Downs. In the grounds are the foundations of an ancient castle, of circular form, surrounded by an inner and an outer moat now dried up; a well which supplied the castle, is now called the "Nun's Well." The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; patron, the Bishop of Chichester. The church is in the decorated style, and contains neat mural monuments to the families of Tudor, Nelthorpe, and Aldridge; in the windows are remains of ancient stained glass. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Nuthurst

NUTHURST, a chapelry, in the parish of Hamptonin-Arden, union of Solihull, Solihull division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick; containing 132 inhabitants, and comprising 600 acres. In the time of Henry III. and for several generations, Nuthurst belonged to the family of Trussell, the last of whom sold it to William Jesson, alderman of Coventry. The chapelry comprises 700 acres, of which 400 are arable, and the remainder pasture, with some wood. The original chapel of ease having become dilapidated, a new edifice was built, chiefly by Bolton King, Esq. A rent-charge of £130 has been awarded as a commutation for the vicarial tithes, and there is a glebe of 10 acres. Mrs. King supports a school.

Nutley (St. Mary)

NUTLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Basingstoke, hundred of Bermondspit, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from the town of Basingstoke; containing 176 inhabitants. The Basingstoke canal and the South-Western railway pass through the parish. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Preston-Candover: the great tithes have been commuted for £200, and the glebe comprises 23½ acres.

Nyland

NYLAND, a tything, in the parish of Kington Magna, union of Wincanton, hundred of Redlane, Sturminster division of the county of Dorset; containing 108 inhabitants.

Nyland

NYLAND, formerly a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Glaston-Twelve-Hides, E. division of Somerset, 6¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Wells; containing, with the tything of Batcombe, 44 inhabitants. The church was dedicated to St. Andrew, and in 670 was given by Kenewalch, King of the West Saxons, to the abbot of Glastonbury, to which parish Nyland is now considered to belong.

Nymett, Broad

NYMETT, BROAD, a parish, in the union of Crediton, hundred of North Tawton, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 1½ mile (W. S. W.) from Bow; containing 50 inhabitants, and comprising 450 acres, of which 155 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 4. 2., and annexed to the rectory of Bow: the tithes have been commuted for £58.

Nymett-Rowland (St. Bartholomew)

NYMETT-ROWLAND (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Crediton, hundred of North Tawton, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 4¾ miles (S. S. E.) from Chumleigh, and 10 miles (N. W.) from Crediton; containing 102 inhabitants. This place, also called Rowland's Leigh, belonged at an early period to Rowland de Nymett, whose descendant, Sir Walter, was possessed of it in the reign of Henry III. It was afterwards in the family of Wolrington, whose heirs were the families of Hache and Buckington. The manor has long been dismembered. The parish comprises by computation 468 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 1. 3., and in the gift of William Henry Tanner, Esq.: there are about 90 acres of glebe. The church is a plain edifice.

Nymett-Tracey, county of Devon.—See Bow.

NYMETT-TRACEY, county of Devon.—See Bow.

Nymphsfield (St. Margaret)

NYMPHSFIELD (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Dursley, Upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 5¼ miles (E. by N.) from Dursley; containing 466 inhabitants. In 1185, this was a chapelry in the parish of Frocester. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 5. 0½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £258, and the glebe comprises 27 acres.

Nympton, or Nymett (St. George)

NYMPTON, or Nymett (St. George), a parish, in the union and hundred of South Molton, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 2½ miles (S. S. W.) from South Molton; containing 272 inhabitants. The manor was early in the family of Nymett, and afterwards in that of Hache, from whom it descended, through the Malets, to the Aclands. The parish is situated on the river Mole, and almost surrounded by the parish of South Molton; the road to Chumleigh passes through the village. A fair has been established. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 19. 2.; net income, £310; patron, Sir T. D. Acland, Bart.: the glebe comprises 100 acres, with a house. The church contains a curious font, and some monuments to the Kanlake family.

Nympton, or Nymett, Bishop's

NYMPTON, or NYMETT, BISHOP'S, a parish, in the union of South Molton, hundred of Witheridge, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from South Molton; containing 1325 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Tiverton to Barnstaple, comprises 7736 acres, of which 1350 are common or waste: the village is pleasantly situated. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of serge. A fair is held on the Wednesday preceding the 25th of October. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £20. 7. 3½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Exeter: the rectorial tithes have been commuted for £421, and the vicarial for £379, with about 2½ acres of garden attached to the glebe-house, which has been recently built. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a lofty square embattled tower, and contains some elegant screen-work, and a rich monument to one of the Pollard family.

Nympton, King's (St. James)

NYMPTON, KING'S (St. James), a parish, in the union of South Molton, hundred of Witheridge, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 3½ miles (N.) from Chumleigh; containing 777 inhabitants. The manor, which was parcel of the ancient demesne of the crown, was granted by King John to Joel de Mayne, by whose rebellion it was again vested in the crown: it was given by Henry III. to Roger le Zouch. In the reign of Edward III. it belonged to Sir Jeffrey Cornwall, whose family continued to possess it in that of Henry V. Sir Lewis Pollard, one of the justices of the common pleas, purchased the manor, built a mansion, and inclosed a park, in the reign of Henry VII. Sir Arthur Northcote, Bart., who died in 1688, purchased King'sNympton of the Pollards; and James Buller, Esq., who died in 1765, purchased the property of the Northcotes, and built the house now called New Place, or King'sNympton Park, afterwards the residence of John Buller, Esq., one of the commissioners of excise. The lords of the manor had anciently the power of inflicting capital punishment. The parish comprises 4572 acres, of which 889 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £28. 6. 8.; net income, £376; patrons, the family of Saville. The church has a handsome wooden screen.

Nytimber

NYTIMBER, a tything, in the parish of Pagham, poor-law union of West Hampnett, hundred of Aldwick, rape of Chichester, W. division of the county of Sussex; containing 241 inhabitants.



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