Ocle-Livers - Offwell

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

469-472

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'Ocle-Livers - Offwell', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 469-472. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51191 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Ocle-Livers

OCLE-LIVERS, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 6½ miles (N. E.) from Hereford; containing 9 inhabitants. A Benedictine priory, a cell to that of Lira, in Normandy, was founded here about 1160.

Ocle-Pitchard (St. James)

OCLE-PITCHARD (St. James), a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 7½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Hereford; containing 219 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the road from Hereford to Bromyard, and comprises 1247 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 19.; patron, Thomas Hill, Esq.

Octon, with Octon-Grange

OCTON, with Octon-Grange, a township, in the parish of Thwing, union of Bridlington, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 8 miles (W.) from Bridlington; containing 105 inhabitants. The hamlet of Octon is small, and lies east of the high road from Bridlington to Sledmere. About a mile to the northnorth-west of it is Octon-Grange, and at the same distance eastward the village of Thwing.

Odcombe (St. Peter and St. Paul)

ODCOMBE (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Houndsborough, Berwick, and Coker, W. division of Somerset, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Yeovil; containing 666 inhabitants. It comprises 1297 acres, of which about 570 are arable, 630 pasture and meadow, and 27 woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 9. 9½., and in the gift of the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £370, and there is a glebe-house, with 50 acres of land. Humphrey Hody, an eminent divine, was born here in 1659.

Oddingley (St. James the Apostle)

ODDINGLEY (St. James the Apostle), a parish, in the union of Droitwich, Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3 miles (S.) from Droitwich; containing 205 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 838a. 1r. 25p. of land, is on the eastern side of the road from Birmingham to Worcester, and is intersected by the Birmingham and Gloucester railroad and the Birmingham and Worcester canal. The surface is undulated and wooded, and the soil a rich marl. The manor is in the possession of John Howard Galton, Esq., and adjoins the manor of Hadsor, in which that gentleman resides. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 19. 4½., and in the gift of Mr. Galton: the tithes have been commuted for £181, and the glebe, to which a house is attached, comprises 12 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style; it consists of a nave, chancel, and north and south transepts, and contains some curious stained glass of the 15th century. A school, conducted on the British and foreign system, is supported by Mrs. Galton. In 1806, this place was the scene of a double murder of a most extraordinary character. The principal victim was the Rev. George Parker, rector of the parish, who, having a dispute with his parishioners relative to the tithes, was despatched by an assassin named Heming, whom a Capt. Evans and some of the farmers had hired for the purpose, and who was himself afterwards murdered, to prevent his possible disclosure of the conspiracy. Suspicion having fallen upon Heming as the murderer of Mr. Parker, search was made for him, but of course in vain: in 1830 his skeleton was discovered in a barn.

Oddington (St. Nicholas)

ODDINGTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Stow-on-the-Wold, Upper division of the hundred of Slaughter, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2½ miles (E.) from Stow; containing 525 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 7. 1.; income, £365; patron, the Precentor of the Cathedral of York: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1786. The church has a Norman door; the building generally is of later date.

Oddington (St. Andrew)

ODDINGTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 8 miles (N. N. E.) from Oxford; containing 126 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the river Ray, and comprises 1280 acres of land, inclosed in 1791, about 900 of which are pasture and the rest arable; the surface is in general flat, and the soil partly a loamy clay, and partly a light stony earth, resting upon limestone, which is of good quality for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 0½.; income, £384; patrons, the President and Fellows of Trinity College, Oxford. Early in the reign of Stephen, one-fourth of the parish belonged to Sir Robert Gait, Knt., who founded a Cistercian abbey, the substructure of which is distinctly visible near Oddington Grange. In 1821, when erecting the parsonage-house, upwards of twenty skeletons were found, with some armour, in the rock; and in various parts of the parish, Roman coins and pottery have been discovered at different times. There is a mineral spring.

Odd-Rode, Chester.—See Rode, Odd.

ODD-RODE, Chester.—See Rode, Odd.

Odell (All Saints)

ODELL (All Saints), a parish, in the hundred of Willey, union and county of Bedford, 1¼ mile (N. E. by N.) from Harrold; containing 501 inhabitants. Odell, anciently called Wahul or Wodhull, was the seat of an ancient barony, belonging, at the time of the Norman survey, to Walter Flandrensis, whose posterity were called de Wahul. A female heir intermarrying with the Chetwodes, of Oakley, in Staffordshire, brought the property to that family, who sold it to the Alstons. Thomas Alston, of Odell, was created a baronet in 1642. The parish is bounded on the south by the river Ouse, and contains 2600 acres, mostly arable land, with some pasture, and 500 acres of woodland; the surface is undulated, the soil various, and the scenery picturesque. Lace is manufactured by some of the females. The place formerly possessed a market, granted in 1222; and a fair is still held on the Thursday and Friday in Whitsun-week. Odell Castle, the seat of the Alston family, a small part of which constitutes the remains of the ancient building of the same name, stands conspicuously on an eminence commanding a fine view of the Ouse. The river here abounds in pike, perch, and eels. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19; patron, Justinian Alston, Esq.: the glebe consists of 420 acres, of the annual value of £350, with a house. The church has an ancient square tower.

Odestone

ODESTONE, a hamlet, in the parish of Shackerstone, union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from the town of Market-Bosworth; containing 180 inhabitants.

Odiham (All Saints)

ODIHAM (All Saints), a market-town and parish, in the union of Hartley-Wintney, hundred of Odiham, Odiham and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 26 miles (N. E.) from Winchester, 37 (N. E.) from Southampton, and 40 (W. S. W.) from London; containing, with the tythings of Murrell, North Warnborough, and Hillside with Stapely, 2817 inhabitants. This place was formerly a free borough belonging to the bishops of Winchester. The castle, which stood about a mile north-west of the town, was built prior to the time of King John, in whose reign it became celebrated for its resistance to the army of Louis, Dauphin of France, though garrisoned only by three officers and ten private soldiers. That monarch was here a few days before the signing of Magna Charta, attended by a retinue of not more than seven knights. In the 27th of Edward I., the town, park, and hundred were granted to the queen, as part of her dower. In the reign of Edward III., David Bruce, King of Scotland, who had been made prisoner at the battle of Neville's Cross, was confined in the fortress for eleven years. The town is pleasantly situated on the side of a chalk hill, and the neighbouring chalk-pits supply the adjacent country with manure, which is conveyed by the Basingstoke canal, about a mile north-east of the town. The London and SouthWestern railway passes through the parish, and has a station about two miles and a half distant. A book-club has been established many years. Races were formerly held. The market is on Tuesday; and fairs take place on the Saturday preceding Mid-Lent Sunday, and on July 31st, for horses and cattle. The county magistrates hold a meeting every fortnight; and constables are annually chosen at the court leet of the manor, held at Easter. Odiham was summoned to send members to parliament in the reigns of Edward I. and Edward II., but never made any return.

The parish comprises 7119a. 29p., of which about 4585 acres are arable, 737 meadow, 484 pasture, 318 woodland, and 730 common. The living is a vicarage, with that of Grewell annexed, valued in the king's books at £23. 11. 5½.; net income, £537, with a glebe-house; patron, the Chancellor of the Cathedral of Salisbury. The church is a large ancient building of brick, coated with stucco; and has lately received an addition of sittings. There are places of worship for the Connexion of the late Countess of Huntingdon, and Independents. A free school was founded in 1694, by Robert May, and endowed with £600 for its general support, and £200 for apprenticing the children; the funds were subsequently augmented by a small rent-charge. Near the church is an almshouse, endowed by Sir Edward More, in 1623, with property now producing about £80 per annum, for eight widowers and widows; and there are apartments for two more persons, with stipends from other benefactions. Vestiges of the keep of the ancient castle are yet visible: the remains of a royal residence have been converted into a farmhouse, still called Palace Gate. William Lilly, the astrologer, was born here about 1468; as was the late venerable and learned Dr. Burgess, Bishop of Salisbury, in 1756.

Odstock, (St. Mary)

ODSTOCK, (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Alderbury, hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 3 miles (S.) from Salisbury; containing 149 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 17. 11.; net income, £282; patron, the Earl of Radnor. The tithes were commuted for land and an annual money payment in 1783.

Odstone

ODSTONE, a tything, in the parish of Ashbury, poor-law union of Farringdon, hundred of Shrivenham, county of Berks; containing 34 inhabitants.

Offchurch (St. Gregory)

OFFCHURCH (St. Gregory), a parish, in the union of Warwick, Kenilworth division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Warwick; containing 367 inhabitants. In Saxon times this was a place of some importance; Offa, King of Mercia, made it his residence. It comprises 2206 acres, and is pleasingly situated on the left bank of the river Leam: on the south the Warwick and Napton canal, and on the east the Roman fosse-way, skirt the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 7. 6.; income, £140 per annum; patron and impropriator, T. W. Knightley, Esq.

Offcoat, with Underwood

OFFCOAT, with Underwood, a liberty, in the parish of Ashbourn, hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby; containing 344 inhabitants. This liberty adjoins the town of Ashbourn on the north, and extends to Kniveton; it comprises 1845 acres of various, but fertile, land, occupied as dairy-farms. Within the liberty are the pleasant and well-built village of Ashbourn Green and the village of Sandy-Brook. Sandy-Brook Hall is a beautiful modern mansion, with a fine lawn and delightful pleasure-grounds, the seat of Sir Matthew Blakiston, Bart. The Green is a handsome residence near Ashbourn Green, well wooded, and on a gentle acclivity, with fine views.

Offenham (St. Milburgh)

OFFENHAM (St. Milburgh), a parish, in the union of Evesham, Upper division of the hundred of Blackenhurst, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Evesham; containing 353 inhabitants. It is said, but on insufficient grounds, to have taken its name from the Saxon king, Offa, who according to tradition had a palace here. The lands were given to the abbey of Evesham by Ethelred, King of Mercia, in 703; and in the Domesday survey the whole place still belonged to the establishment: the abbots had a park in Offenham, to which they frequently resorted; and in the summer of 1843, extensive foundations of buildings were discovered, with fragments of mullions and doorways. The parish is situated on the left bank of the navigable river Avon, and consists of 1179a. 3r. 13p. of productive land. The living is a discharged perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £6. 11. 5½.; net income, £123; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church, which stands at the south-west end of the village, is a simple structure, with a tower. The parish is entitled to £5 per annum for the support of a Sunday school, the bequest of John Millard, who died in 1827.

Offerton

OFFERTON, a township, in the parish and union of Stockport, hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 2½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Stockport; containing 354 inhabitants. It comprises 524 acres, of which the prevailing soil is clay.

Offerton

OFFERTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Hope, union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 5½ miles (N. E.) from Tideswell; containing 22 inhabitants.

Offerton

OFFERTON, a township, in the parish and union of Houghton-le-Spring, N. division of Easington ward and of the county of Durham, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from Sunderland; containing 200 inhabitants. It derives its name (formerly Ufferton) from the Saxon, signifying "Higher Town," it being situated on a high brow of ground that overlooks the vale of the Wear: the place was one of those villages which Athelstan gave to the see of Durham as an appendage to the villa dilecta of South Wearmouth. The township comprises 732a. 3r., of which 526 acres are arable, 155 in grass, 12 wood, and 39 waste: the village is in the north-eastern extremity of the parish. Here is a mineral spring.

Offham (St. Michael)

OFFHAM (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Malling, hundred of Larkfield, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 3¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Wrotham; containing 358 inhabitants. The parish comprises 707 acres, of which 320 are in wood: Kentish ragstone abounds here. A fair for pedlery is held on Trinity Monday. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £218. The church is principally in the early English style, with a tower on the north side between the nave and chancel. The great Roman military way from the Weald to London crosses Offham. Jack Straw, the rebel in the reign of Richard II., is said to have been born at Pepingstraw, in the parish. Offham-green is remarkable for having on it the ancient instrument of amusement called the quintain.

Offham

OFFHAM, a tything, in the parish of Southstoke, hundred of Avisford, rape of Arundel, W. division of the county of Sussex, 1¼ mile (N. E.) from Arundel; containing 56 inhabitants.

Offley (St. Mary Magdalene)

OFFLEY (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Hitchin, hundred of Hitchin and Pirton, county of Hertford, 3¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Hitchin; containing 1140 inhabitants. This place received its name from King Offa, who is said to have died here. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £298, with a glebe-house; patron, the Marquess of Salisbury: the impropriate tithes were commuted for land in 1768. The church has a very handsome chancel, erected in 1777 by Dame Sarah Salusbury, who also left £1000, which have been applied to the foundation and support of a charity school. In a wood at Highdowns are several barrows and dykes, supposed to be of British origin.

Offley, High (St. Mary)

OFFLEY, HIGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newport, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 4½ miles (S. W.) from Eccleshall; containing 658 inhabitants. It comprises about 2700 acres, of which 1250 are arable, 1200 pasture, 50 woodland, and 200 in roads and canal. The road from Eccleshall to Newport, in Shropshire, and the old road from Stafford to Newport, unite in the parish, which is also intersected by the Birmingham and Liverpool canal. The village obtains the prefix to its name from its situation upon a bold eminence, and commands an extensive view including the Wrekin, in Shropshire, and hills in Wales. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 0½., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Lichfield: the rectorial tithes, leased to Sir Delves Broughton, Bart., have been commuted for £300, and the vicarial for £157. 10. Portions of the glebe land were taken by the Birmingham and Liverpool Canal Company, and the purchase money invested in the funds for the benefit of the vicar: there are now 86 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient edifice, neatly pewed with oak, and has a good organ, presented in 1816 by John Salmon, Esq., of London. Sir Charles Skrymsher, in 1708-9, left a rent-charge of £10 per annum, which is paid by Lord Anson (who purchased the estate), and applied to apprenticing a boy; £6 per annum are also paid by Lord Anson for the poor, the gift of Mrs. Baldwin. The foundations of a Roman road are traceable in the fields a little north of the church; and Roman coins, bricks, armour, and fragments of pottery, have been found.

Offlow, Bishop's, or Bishop's Offley

OFFLOW, BISHOP'S, or Bishop's Offley, a township, in the parish of Adbaston, union of Newport, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (W.) from Eccleshall; containing 201 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Broughton to Adbaston, and has a small village, a mile and a half north of the parish church. In the hamlet of Outwoods or Outlands, within the township, died, in 1714, William Wakeley, aged 125 years. The tithes have been commuted for £123. 15.

Offord-Cluny (All Saints)

OFFORD-CLUNY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Toseland, county of Huntingdon, 3½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Huntingdon; containing 301 inhabitants. It is situated on the eastern bank of the river Ouse, and comprises 1023a. 31p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 2. 1.; net income, £220; patron, the Bishop of London. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1801: there is a glebe-house, with 254 acres of land. Dr. Newcome, master of St. John's College, Cambridge, was rector of the parish.

Offord-Darcy (St. Peter)

OFFORD-DARCY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Toseland, county of Huntingdon, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from St. Neot's; containing 306 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Ouse, about 2 miles from which, on the east, and in a parallel line, runs the great north road. It comprises 1700 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 2. 8½., and in the gift of G. Thornhill, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £42. 12., and the glebe comprises 42 acres.

Offton (St. Mary)

OFFTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Bosmere and Claydon, E. division of Suffolk, 8 miles (W. N. W.) from Ipswich; containing 417 inhabitants, and comprising 1535a. 2r. 15p. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the rectory of Little Bricett united, and valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 0½.; patron and impropriator, H. W. Sparrow, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £216. 10., and the vicarial for £183. 10.: there is a glebe-house, with about 28 acres of land. Upon a chalky hill in the parish are the remains of a fortification said to have been built by Offa, King of Mercia, from whom the place perhaps took its name. In a meadow near Talmash Hall, formerly a large mansion, was a chapel, the site of which is still pointed out.

Offwell (St. Mary)

OFFWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Honiton, hundred of Colyton, Honiton and S. divisions of Devon, 2½ miles (E. S. E.) from Honiton; containing 438 inhabitants. It comprises 1918 acres, of which 340 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 3. 6½.; income, £347; patron, the Rev. J. G. Copleston. Dr. Copleston, formerly provost of Oriel College, Oxford, and created Bishop of Llandaff in 1828, was born here.



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