Overton - Ovington

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

498-500

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'Overton - Ovington', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 498-500. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51199 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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Overton

OVERTON, a township, in the parish of Malpas, union of Wrexham, Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 1½ mile (N. W.) from Malpas; containing 110 inhabitants. It comprises 699 acres, the soil of which is partly clay and partly sand. The tithes have been commuted for £84.

Overton

OVERTON, a village, in the parish of Frodsham, union of Runcorn, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of Cheshire; adjoining the town of Frodsham, and containing 557 inhabitants. It includes the parochial church.

Overton

OVERTON, a township, in the parish and union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 4½ miles (S. W.) from Lancaster; containing 390 inhabitants. In the reign of Henry III., Adam de Overton held lands here; and here, also, the priory of Lancaster had a grange, the site of which appears to have been granted to the monks about 1272. The township comprises 680 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture; and occupies a peninsula formed by the river Lune and Morecambe bay. Sunderland, a village in the township, at the mouth of the Lune, is approached by a dangerous ford over a small bay, scarcely passable except when the tide has retired. About the early part of the last century, Sunderland was the port of Lancaster; and it flourished many years by a prosperous coasting-trade and a ropery, until the removal of the dependent customhouse and the shipping to the new dock constructed in 1787, at Glasson, on the opposite side of the river. Sunderland declined so much afterwards as to be called Cape Famine; but it has in some measure revived. The parochial chapelry of Overton comprises the townships of Overton, Middleton, and Heaton with Oxcliffe. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £155; patron, the Vicar of Lancaster. The chapel is a very ancient building, with a fine Saxon porch, and a campanile tower.

Overton

OVERTON, a township, in the parish of Richard'sCastle, union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 1¾ mile (S. by W.) from Ludlow; containing 77 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Ludlow to Leominster, and comprises about 2000 acres, of which 500 are wood, and the rest arable and pasture. The surface is undulated, the soil various, and the scenery picturesque. Good building-stone is obtained.

Overton (St. Mary)

OVERTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Whitchurch, hundred of Overton, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Whitchurch; containing 1590 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 6400 acres, of which about 600 are woodland, 100 meadow, and the rest arable. The village is situated on the great western road; and the river Test, which rises about a mile distant, runs through it. A manufactory for throwing silk affords employment to the greater part of the females. Fairs are held on May 4th, Whit-Monday, July 18th, and October 22nd, the last a considerable fair for sheep. Overton formerly sent two members to parliament. The living is a vicarage, with that of Tadley annexed, in the patronage of the Rector, valued in the king's books at £14. 12. 3½.; net income, £320. The rectory is a sinecure, valued in the king's books at £29. 19. 7.; net income, £50; patron, the Bishop of Winchester. There is a place of worship for Independents; and the Whitchurch union workhouse is situated here.

Overton (St. Michael)

OVERTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Marlborough, partly in the hundred of Elstub and Everley, but chiefly in that of Selkley, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of Wilts, 3½ miles (S. by W.) from Marlborough; containing, with the merged parish of Fyfield, the chapelry of Alton-Priors, and the tything of Lockeridge, 1082 inhabitants, of whom 457 are in the township of West Overton. The lands are laid out in sheep-farms, and are intersected by the river Kennet, which is here generally dry in summer. A few persons are engaged in the making of straw-plat. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £23. 0. 5.; net income, £319; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Marlborough. The church is in the later English style. At Alton-Priors is a chapel of ease.

Overton (St. Cuthbert)

OVERTON (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of York, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York; containing, with the township of Shipton, and part of Skelton, 764 inhabitants, of whom 68 are in Overton township, 4¾ miles (N. W.) from York. Overton was the chief country residence of the abbots of York, and was sold in the 5th of Elizabeth to John Herbert; it passed in 1827 from Mrs. Earle, the last of the family of Bouchier, to the late Viscount Downe. The township is in the vale of the Ouse, and comprises about 1330 acres of land, of the richest quality. The York and Newcastle railway passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 8. 11½.; net income, £131; patron and impropriator, Viscount Downe.

Overton, Cold (St. John the Baptist)

OVERTON, COLD (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 7 miles (S. E. by S.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 118 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 12. 3½., and in the gift of the family of Hartopp: the tithes have been commuted for £269, and the glebe comprises 45 acres, with a house.

Overton-Heath

OVERTON-HEATH, an extra-parochial liberty, in the hundred of Selkley, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of Wilts; containing, with ClatfordPark, also extra-parochial, 40 inhabitants.

Overton, Market (St. Peter and St. Paul)

OVERTON, MARKET (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Alstoe, county of Rutland, 6 miles (N. by E.) from Oakham; containing 503 inhabitants. It is intersected by the Oakham canal, and comprises 1778a. 2r. 34p. The surface is flat, with the exception of a hill in the western part overlooking the vale of Catmore; the soil is in some parts clayey, and in others light and strong. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 11. 3.; income, £507; patron, John Wingfield, Esq. The tithes were commuted in 1803 for land.

Overtown

OVERTOWN, a tything, in the parish of Wroughton, union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Elstub and Everley, Swindon and N. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 78 inhabitants.

Overy

OVERY, a hamlet, in the parish, union, and hundred of Dorchester, Dorchester division of the county of Dorset; containing 38 inhabitants.

Oving (All Saints)

OVING (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Aylesbury, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Aylesbury; containing 391 inhabitants. The making of lace is carried on. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 11., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £232. There are some remains of a castle.

Oving

OVING, a parish, in the union of West Hampnett, hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 2½ miles (E.) from Chichester; containing, with the tything of Colworth and the ville of Portfield, 790 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2946 acres, of which 194 are common or waste; it is intersected by the Arundel and Portsmouth canal. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 10½.: patron, the Precentor in the Cathedral of Chichester: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £270. The church is built in the style of the thirteenth century, of flint, with stone quoins and dressings, and is in the shape of a cross, with a tower surmounted by a shingled spire at the west end. In 1839, it was thoroughly repaired and restored, and the churchyard newly laid out, and surrounded with a wall and iron-railing, by Miss Woods; and opposite to it that lady has erected two elegant buildings in the Tudor style, one intended for eight old persons, and the other containing two schoolrooms, with a residence for the master and mistress between them. There is also a parsonage-house, of corresponding character. In 1827, Mrs. Green bequeathed £2000 for the support of three widows.

Ovingdean

OVINGDEAN, a parish, in the union of Newhaven, hundred of Younsmere, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Brighton; containing 116 inhabitants. It lies on the coast, and comprises 1618 acres, of which a large portion is arable, and the rest down land and waste: the village is situated in a pleasant valley about a mile from the sea. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 5. 6.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. A. Stead: the tithes have been commuted for £382; and there is a glebe-house, with about an acre and a half of land. The church is in the early English style, and from the remains of pointed arches now built up on the south side, is supposed to have been formerly much larger than at present. Not far from it is an ancient farmhouse, recently modernised, in which Charles II., sought refuge prior to his escape to the continent.

Ovingham (St. Mary)

OVINGHAM (St. Mary), a parish, partly in the union of Hexham, and partly in that of Castle ward, E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland; containing 3429 inhabitants, of whom 257 are in Ovingham township, 11 miles (W.) from Newcastle. The parish comprises the townships of Dukershagg, Eltringham, Harlow-Hill, Hedley-on-theHill, Hedley-Woodside, Horsley, Mickley, Nafferton, Ovingham, Ovington, Prudhoe, Prudhoe-Castle, Rutchester, Spittle, Welton, Whittle, and Wylam. It is on both sides of the Tyne, on the borders of which river the soil is productive, and interspersed with wood; in some parts the land is bare of wood, and a strong clay soil. Several coal-mines are in operation; small quantities of ironstone are found, and freestone in most of the townships. The road from Newcastle to Hexham, and the old military road, now a public highway, pass through the parish. The township of Ovingham comprises 446 acres, and is situated on the north bank of the Tyne, parallel with which, on the south side, runs the Newcastle and Carlisle railway: in the village are a brewery, and a dye-house and bleaching-grounds. Fairs are held on 26th April and 26th October.

The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5. 8. 4., and recently endowed by C. W. Bigge, Esq., who is patron and impropriator, with £21 per annum; total net income, £161. There is a glebe-house, with 39 acres of land; the house, which is ancient, occupies the site, and includes the remains, of a cell of Black canons, founded by one of the Umfravilles, and the revenue of which at the Dissolution was £13. 4. 8. The tithes of Ovingham township have been commuted for £78. The church is an elegant and commodious structure in the early English style, in the shape of a Greek cross, with a very ancient tower of the date 1180. At Hall-Yards, near Mickley, is a chapel, consecrated 31st August, 1824. The Wesleyans, Independents, and Presbyterians have places of worship; and numerous schools have been built. Thomas Bewick, the celebrated wood-engraver, was born in the parish; as was also John Jackson, one of the best wood-engravers of the present day.

Ovington

OVINGTON, a parish, in the union of Risbridge, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 2¼ miles (S. by W.) from Clare; containing 166 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, with that of Tilbury consolidated, valued in the king's books at £7, and in the gift of John Fisher, Esq.: the tithes of Ovington have been commuted for £207, and the glebe comprises 22 acres. The church, a small neat edifice, is pleasantly seated on an eminence surrounded with trees.

Ovington (St. John the Evangelist)

OVINGTON (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wayland, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (N. N. E.) from Watton; containing 268 inhabitants. It comprises 1475a. 1r. 35p., of which 1171 acres are arable, 280 pasture, and 22 woodland and plantations. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 3. 6½., and in the gift of the University of Cambridge; the tithes have been commuted for £410, and the glebe comprises 23 acres, with a small house. The church is an ancient structure, and contains portions of the Norman style, and of each style of English architecture. On the borders of the parish are some traces of a Roman camp; and coins, military weapons, &c., have been ploughed up near the spot.

Ovington

OVINGTON, a township, in the parish of Ovingham, union of Hexham, E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 12 miles (W.) from Newcastle-upon-Tyne; containing 380 inhabitants. It comprises 1100 acres, of which the soil varies from sand to strong clay; the surface is undulated. The village, which is agreeable and well built, is on the north side of the Tyne, distant one mile west from Ovingham. The tithes have been commuted for £206.

Ovington

OVINGTON, a parish, in the union of Alresford, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2 miles (W. by S.) from Alresford; containing 163 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 10; net income, £219; patron, the Bishop of Winchester. The tithes were commuted for land in 1812.

Ovington

OVINGTON, a township, in the parish of Forcett, union of Teesdale, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Barnard-Castle; containing 159 inhabitants. It is situated on the border of the river Tees, and intersected by the road from Darlington to Greta-Bridge; and comprises 492a. 28p., of which 186 acres are arable, 287 pasture, and 18 woodland. The soil is rather thin, resting upon clay, but favourable to the production of all kinds of crops; the scenery, which embraces the banks of the Tees, is varied and beautiful. There is a brewery, and malting is carried on to a great extent. The tithes have been commuted for £23 payable to the vicar of Gilling, and £30 to Sir Thomas Aston Clifford Constable, Bart. The Protestant inhabitants attend Wycliffe church, distant a mile, as do the Roman Catholic portion a place of worship at Wycliffe Hall. In the village is a noted May-pole, twenty-one yards high.