Publow - Pusey

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

618-621

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'Publow - Pusey', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 618-621. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51225 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


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Publow (All Saints)

PUBLOW (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Clutton, hundred of Keynsham, E. division of Somerset, ¼ of a mile (N. E.) from Pensford; containing, with part of the hamlet of Woolard, 841 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the river Chew, and comprises about 1335 acres. The substratum contains copper-ore, and some mills have been established by a company for the manufacture of copper, in which about 30 persons are employed; there are also quarries of stone used chiefly for the roads. Fairs are held on the 6th of May and the 8th of November, for sheep and cattle. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Rev. James Daubeny: the tithes have been commuted for £266. 16. 1., and the glebe consists of about 64 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, with a handsome tower. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; and a national school endowed with £40 per annum.

Puckeridge

PUCKERIDGE, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Braughin, and partly in that of Standon, union of Ware, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford, 9 miles (N. E. by N.) from Hertford; containing 497 inhabitants. This place is situated on the road to Cambridge, and on the line of the ancient Ermin-street. According to Tanner, a free chapel with a chantry existed here in the reign of Edward II.

Puckington (St. Andrew)

PUCKINGTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Langport, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset, 2¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Ilminster; containing 229 inhabitants, of whom 41 are in the hamlet of Little Puckington. The parish comprises 610 acres, of which 48 are waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 7. 3½., and in the gift of Lord Portman: the tithes have been commuted for £100, and the glebe comprises 89 acres.

Puckle-Church (St. Thomas à Becket)

PUCKLE-CHURCH (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Chipping-Sodbury, hundred of Puckle-Church, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 7 miles (E. N. E.) from Bristol; containing 862 inhabitants. This was the site of a palace of the Saxon kings of England, in which Edmund received a stab from Leolf, a notorious robber, which caused his death. The parish comprises 2400 acres: coal is found. A market formerly held has long been disused. The living is a vicarage, with the livings of Wick and Abson, and Westerleigh, united, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 4.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Wells. The tithes have been commuted for £765. 8., and there are about 60 acres of glebe, with a house. The church is partly Norman. The Rev. Henry Berrow, in 1718, founded a free school, of which the annual income is £52. 10.

Pudding-Norton.—See Norton, Pudding.

PUDDING-NORTON.—See Norton, Pudding.

Puddington, Bedford.—See Poddington.

PUDDINGTON, Bedford.—See Poddington.

Puddington

PUDDINGTON, a township, in the parish of Burton, union, and Higher division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 8 miles (N. W.) from Chester; containing 146 inhabitants. Hamon de Massey held the manor at the time of the Domesday survey; and a branch of the Massey family, whose ancestor was Richard Massey (a younger brother of Hamon, fifth baron of Dunham), settled in the township in the early part of the 13th century. The last male heir died in 1716, bequeathing his estates to the Rev. Thomas Stanley, a younger son of Sir William Stanley, Bart.; who took the name of Massey, and died in 1740, when the property passed to his elder brother, John, who also assumed the additional name of Massey. On the death of Sir William Stanley, the fifth baronet, in 1792, the title and estates of both families were concentrated in his uncle, the John Stanley Massey just mentioned, who resumed the name of Stanley, and died in 1794. The manor is now the property of Rowland Errington, Esq., second son of the late Sir Thomas Massey Stanley. The township lies on the river Dee, and comprises 1359 acres, of which the prevailing soil is clay; 127 acres are common or waste. Puddington Hall is an elegant modern edifice: part of the ancient seat of the Masseys still remains. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £190, payable to the master of St. John's Hospital, Chester. Here is a Roman Catholic chapel.

Puddington (St. Thomas à Becket)

PUDDINGTON (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Crediton, hundred of Witheridge, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 8 miles (N.) from the town of Crediton; containing 212 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 1347 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 8. 1½., and in the gift of C. N. Welman, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £131, and there are 81 acres of glebe. The church is a plain edifice, to which an aisle was added a few years ago. Here is a Presbyterian place of worship.

Puddlestone (St. Peter)

PUDDLESTONE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 5¾ miles (E. by N.) from Leominster; containing, with the township of Brockmanton, 277 inhabitants. It is situated on the borders of Worcestershire, and comprises 1706 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, with the living of While (which, according to tradition, was formerly a distinct parish), valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 8½.; net income, £276; patron, E. Chadwick, Esq.

Puddletown, Dorset.—See Piddletown.

PUDDLETOWN, Dorset.—See Piddletown.

Pudlicott

PUDLICOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Charlbury, union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford, 4½ miles (S. by W.) from ChippingNorton; containing, with Chilson and Shorthampton, 287 inhabitants.

Pudsey

PUDSEY, a township, in the parish of Calverley, union of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 6 miles (W.) from Leeds; containing 10,002 inhabitants. This place, in the Domesday survey Podechesaie, anciently belonged to the Calverley family, by whom the manor was sold in the reign of Edward II. to the Milners, of whom Charles Milner, Esq. is the present lord. The township includes the hamlet of Tyersal, with a considerable portion of Stanningley, and comprises by measurement 2359 acres: the soil is tolerably fertile, and a large portion of it is in good cultivation; coal of inferior quality is found, and there are quarries of building-stone. The population is principally employed in the woollen manufacture, which is carried on to a very great extent; and within the township are not less than twelve joint-stock mills, which average about forty partners in each. The village formerly consisted only of a few scattered hamlets, but has been so much increased and connected by additional buildings, that it now forms one of the most extensive clothing towns in the West riding. It is situated on the brow of a lofty acclivity, and the valley is watered by a winding tributary of the river Aire, on the banks of which are numerous scribbling and fulling mills, and establishments for dyeing wool. An act for lighting was passed in 1845. The old chapel of Pudsey, built towards the close of the seventeenth century, is now disused; a church, dedicated to St. Lawrence, having been erected in 1823 by the Parliamentary Commissioners, at an expense of £13,362. It is a spacious and elegant structure in the later English style, with a lofty square embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, and, being on an eminence, forms a conspicuous and interesting feature in the landscape; the east window is of large dimensions, and enriched with stained glass; there are 2000 sittings, of which 660 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £158, with a good residence; patron, the Vicar of Calverley. A church district named St. Paul's was endowed in 1846 by the Ecclesiastical Commission; the population of it is between two and three thousand, and the living is in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon, alternately. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Kilhamites, Moravians, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans. On taking down an old house at Fartown, in 1834, 363 silver coins of the reigns of Edward VI., Elizabeth, James, and Charles I., were found.

Pulborough (St. Mary)

PULBOROUGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thakeham, hundred of West Easwrith, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 9 miles (N. N. E.) from Arundel; containing 2006 inhabitants. The parish comprises 6398a. 7p., whereof 5000 acres are a rich loam, 1000 clay land, 82 in roads, 41 water, and 199 waste. The village is on the road from Arundel to London, and is partly upon elevated ground, commanding a pleasing prospect: the river Arun and the Arun canal pass through the parish. There are quarries of sandstone which hardens on exposure to the air. A market for corn is held on Friday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 11. 7½., and in the gift of Colonel Wyndham: the tithes have been commuted for £1700, and the glebe consists of 165 acres. The church, which is picturesquely situated on a sandstone hill, is in the early English style, with later additions. On the south-west of the churchyard, a small chapel was taken down about fifty years since. At Old Place are the remains of a mansion erected in the reign of Henry VI., with part of a fosse; and at New Place are the remains of another, built in the reign of Edward I. A short distance from the village, to the west, is a circular mound, on which are the foundations of a castle; and vestiges of several other ancient buildings have been discovered of late years. The Roman road from Regnum (Chichester) to London passes in a right line through the parish for three miles and a half.

Pulford (St. Mary)

PULFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester; containing, with Poulton township, 335 inhabitants, of whom 206 are in the township of Pulford, 5¼ miles (S. S. W.) from Chester. The parish is situated on the road from Chester to Wrexham, and bounded by the Pulford brook, which separates this part of the county from Denbighshire. It comprises 2225 acres, of which 1055 are in the township of Pulford; the soil is mostly a stiff clay, favourable to the growth of wheat. Here is a station of the Chester and Ruabon railway. A court is annually held by the Grosvenor family as lords of the manor. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 15. 10., and in the gift of the Grosvenor family: the tithes have been commuted for £200, and the glebe consists of six acres, with a house, rebuilt by the late Marquess of Westminster in 1820. The present church, a cruciform structure in the later English style, was also built by his lordship, in the year 1833. In a field belonging to the rectory, called the Castle Hill, are still to be seen traces of a fosse and other remains of an ancient fortification.

Pulham (St. Mary Magdalene)

PULHAM (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Depwade, hundred of Earsham, E. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (N. W.) from Harleston; containing 1155 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Harleston to Norwich, comprises 2956a. 39p. of land, mostly arable. A few of the inhabitants are employed in weaving for the Norwich manufacturers. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the rectory of Pulham St. Mary the Virgin. The church is a handsome structure, partly in the early and partly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans. A farmhouse, some cottages, and 75 acres of land, produce £120 per annum, for the repair of the church and the relief of the poor. The ancient Hall of a branch of the Percy family, formerly resident here, has been taken down. The union workhouse is situated in the parish.

Pulham (St. Mary the Virgin)

PULHAM (St. Mary the Virgin), a parish, in the union of Depwade, hundred of Earsham, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (N. W.) from Harleston; containing 924 inhabitants. This place is situated on the road from Harleston to Norwich. Soon after the Conquest it formed, with Pulham St. Mary Magdalene, one large town two miles in length, and one mile in breadth. In 1294, the inhabitants obtained a grant of a weekly market which has long been discontinued, and of an annual fair, which is still held in the village of St. Mary Magdalene. The parish comprises 2998a. 3r. 32p. of land, chiefly arable. The living is a rectory, with the curacy of St. Mary Magdalene annexed, valued in the king's books at £33. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes of the two parishes have been commuted for £1308, and the glebe comprises 37 acres, with a parsonage-house, greatly improved by the Rev. William Leigh. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a lofty square embattled tower formerly surmounted by a spire, and a handsome south porch supposed to have been built by William of Wykeham; the chancel is separated from the nave by an exquisitely-carved screen, and the east window is embellished with stained glass: on the south side, a very beautiful double piscina in the Norman style was discovered in 1841. A parochial school was founded in 1670, by William Pennoyer, Esq., who at once endowed it with a rent-charge of £5, and by will ordered the master's salary to be extended to £20 per annum; the school is held in what was the chapel of the guild of St. James, founded here at an early period, and which subsisted till the reign of Edward VI. The town estate, consisting of 28 acres of land and some cottages, producing £63 per annum, is appropriated to the repair of the church and general purposes. Henry de Wingham, Bishop of London; William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester; Nicholas Claggett, Bishop of Exeter; William Broome, LL.D., an eminent Greek scholar; and the Hon. and Rev. Edward Townshend, Dean of Norwich, were all rectors of the parish.

Pulham, East (St. Thomas à Becket)

PULHAM, EAST (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Cerne, partly in the hundred of Buckland-Newton, and partly in the liberty of Bindon, Cerne division of Dorset, 7½ miles (S. E.) from Sherborne; containing, with the manor of West Pulham, 323 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 17. 11., and in the gift of the Rev. T. F. M. Halsey: the tithes have been commuted for £410, and the glebe comprises 54 acres.

Pulloxhill (St. James)

PULLOXHILL (St. James), a parish, in the union of Ampthill, hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) from Ampthill; containing 611 inhabitants. It comprises an area of 1582a. 3r. 15p., for the most part rich grazing land, and rather hilly. Some appearances of a vein of gold were discovered a few years since, but the produce was not sufficient to defray the expense of working it. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 10.; patron, Earl de Grey; impropriators, the landowners. The tithes have been commuted for £200, and there are upwards of 30 acres of glebe. The chancel only of the church is standing.

Pulverbatch, Church (St. Edith)

PULVERBATCH, CHURCH (St. Edith), a parish, in the union of Atcham, hundred of Condover, S. division of Salop, 8 miles (S. W. by S.) from Shrewsbury; containing 543 inhabitants. This place was distinguished in ancient times for its castle, which had within it a chapel, called the royal free chapel of Pullerbache. It had a charter for a weekly market and an annual fair, granted by Henry III. The parish comprises 4113a. 35p. of land, for the most part hilly. The soil is in general tolerably good, but a portion of it is of no great depth, and on a basis of rock; in some places it is sharp, stony, and dry, and in others rather loamy and mellow, lying more upon clay. Some coal-pits are worked. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 13. 4., and in the gift of Lord Kenyon: the tithes have been commuted for £520, and there are 46 acres of glebe, with a house. The church has been enlarged. Here is a place of worship for Baptists.

Puncknowle (St. Mary)

PUNCKNOWLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bridport, hundred of Uggscombe, Dorchester division of Dorset, 5½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Bridport; containing 425 inhabitants. This parish, which is watered by the river Bride, and bounded on the south by the English Channel, comprises by computation 1800 acres. Here are several quarries of limestone, which is used for burning into lime, and for mending roads; and some of the females are employed in making fishingnets. Bexington, in the parish, was, with its church, burnt by the French, in 1470: they carried away the inhabitants, whom they forced to redeem themselves; and the vill, of which, and of the church, there are but slight remains, has since been a farm. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14, and in the gift of the family of Frome; the tithes have been commuted for £300, and there is a glebe of 40 acres, with a house. The church is a small low fabric, standing in the centre of the parish. There are some remains of encampments, supposed to be Roman; and in 1791, about 1200 ancient coins were turned up by the plough.

Purbright (St. Michael)

PURBRIGHT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Guildford, First division of the hundred of Woking, W. division of Surrey, 6 miles (N. W. by N.) from Guildford; containing 657 inhabitants. This place was originally a chapelry in the parish and royal manor of Woking, and was called Pirifrith; it is uncertain when it was detached, but it appears to have become a separate manor before the reign of Henry III., when the lands belonged to the Clares, earls of Gloucester. The parish comprises 1316 acres of good land, of which 585 are arable, 299 meadow, and 432 pasture and wood; there are also 3006 acres of waste land or common. The Basingstoke canal and the London and South-Western railway pass through. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £82; patron and impropriator, Henry Halsey, Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for £380. The church contains 230 free sittings.

Purfleet

PURFLEET, a chapelry, in the parish of West Thurrock, union of Orsett, hundred of Chafford, S. division of Essex, 16½ miles (E. by S.) from London; containing 704 inhabitants. This place lies at the mouth of a rivulet which empties itself into the Thames, and a small harbour has been made. The village is pleasantly situated on rising ground, commanding a fine view of the adjacent country, which is thickly studded with handsome seats, villas, and farmhouses, and enriched with large tracts of woodland and thriving plantations. Here are extensive lime-works and chalk-pits; also considerable bomb-proof magazines for gunpowder, belonging to government.

Puriton (St. Michael)

PURITON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of Huntspill and Puriton, W. division of Somerset, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Bridgwater; containing 452 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1522 acres. The Exeter and Bath, and Exeter and Bristol roads pass within half a mile of the village; the navigable river Parret runs on the south-west, and the Bristol and Exeter railway intersects the parish. Several quarries here produce blue lias of the best quality, which is used for building and paving, and the repair of roads. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to that of Woolavington, and valued in the king's books at £6. 15. 10.: there are 5 acres of glebe. The church is supposed to have been erected in 1450.

Purleigh (All Saints)

PURLEIGH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 4 miles (S. by W.) from Maldon; containing 1213 inhabitants. The parish consists of elevated ground commanding extensive and richly-diversified views over the surrounding country, and comprises 5481a. 1r. 16p., of which a tenth part is pasture, and about 123 acres are woodland. A fair is held on Whit-Tuesday. The living is a rectory, annexed to the Provostship of Oriel College, Oxford, and valued in the king's books at £25; net income of both offices, £1141. The church is large and handsome, with an embattled tower of flint and stone; and in the north aisle is a chapel formerly belonging to the Bourchier family, whose armorial bearings were painted in the window, in which there is still some stained glass. A school is partly supported by an endowment of £30 per annum.

Purley (St. Mary)

PURLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bradfield, hundred of Theale, county of Berks, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Reading; containing 198 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 868 acres, of which 630 are arable, 165 pasture and meadow, 31 woodland, 21 in roads and waste, and 20 occupied by the line of the Great Western railway. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 3½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £300, and there is a glebe of 48 acres. The church is a very neat structure.

Purston

PURSTON, a hamlet, in the parishes of Newbottle and King's-Sutton, hundred of King's-Sutton, union of Brackley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4¾ miles (W. N. W.) from the town of Brackley; containing 58 inhabitants.

Purston-Jaglin.—See Peerston-Jaglin.

PURSTON-JAGLIN.—See Peerston-Jaglin.

Purton (St. Mary)

PURTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Cricklade and Wootton-Bassett, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Cricklade and N. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from WoottonBassett; containing, with the hamlet of Braydon, 2141 inhabitants. The Wilts and Berks canal, and the Great Western and Cheltenham railway, pass through the parish. Fairs are held on the Tuesday before May 6th, and the Friday after Sept. 19th. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £22. 17. 6.; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Shaftesbury: the great tithes have been commuted for £722, the vicarial for £599, and the glebe comprises 53 acres. The church is a large handsome structure, with two towers, of which the eastern has a lofty spire: it contains monuments to the families of Ashley-Cooper and Maskelyne; and Dr. Maskelyne, astronomer-royal, was buried here in 1811. There are places of worship for Independents and Primitive Methodists. In the parish is a camp supposed to be Danish, with a double ditch, the inner one very deep and perfect. The extensive hamlet of Braydon, once a forest, but disafforested in the 5th of Charles II., is now principally held by Mr. Neeld, whose increasing plantations seem likely to realize its ancient character: a stream that ran through it has been converted into a handsome lake.

Pusey (All Saints)

PUSEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Farringdon, hundred of Ganfield, county of Berks, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Farringdon; containing 108 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 1028 acres, derives its name from the family of Pusey, to whom the manor was granted by Canute the Great. According to Dr. Hicks, the place was in his time in the possession of Charles Pusey, Esq., who had recovered it in chancery before Lord Chancellor Jeffreys, upon which occasion the identical horn by which, under the charter of Canute, the manor had been held for 700 years, was produced in court: the horn is that of an ox, of a dark brown colour, and was perhaps used for drinking, or more probably as a hunting-horn. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 12. 11.; net income, £163; patron, the Bishop of Salisbury. The church was rebuilt at the expense of J. Allen Pusey, Esq., who died in 1789; and contains a handsome marble monument to his memory.