Rede - Reeth

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

652-655

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'Rede - Reeth', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 652-655. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51234 Date accessed: 23 September 2014.


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Rede (All Saints)

REDE (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 6 miles (S. W. by W.) from the town of Bury St. Edmunds; containing 241 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1150 acres: the village is small and very compact. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 18. 1½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £286, and the glebe comprises 24 acres. A national school is supported by a bequest producing an income of £12 per annum, with some smaller benefactions.

Redenham

REDENHAM, a hamlet, in the parish of Fyfield, union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 122 inhabitants.

Redghill

REDGHILL, a tything, in the parish of Windford, union of Bedminster, hundred of Hartcliffe with Bedminster, E. division of the county of Somerset; containing 344 inhabitants.

Redgrave (St. Botolph)

REDGRAVE (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hartismere, W. division of Suffolk; containing, with the chapelry and town of Botesdale, 1352 inhabitants, of whom 719 are in the Redgrave portion. The parish comprises 2115a. 1r. 32p., and is bounded on the north by the Lesser Ouse, which separates it from the county of Norfolk. Redgrave Hall, anciently the seat of the Bacons, afterwards of the Holt family, and now of George St. Vincent Wilson, Esq., is a handsome residence. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 7. 1.; net income, £777; patron, Mr. Wilson. The church has a tower of white brick, recently erected, and is in the decorated English style: on the south side of the chancel are three sedilia of stone, with enriched canopies; the east window, of seven lights, is ornamented with tracery. There are several monuments of considerable beauty of design and execution, particularly that of the celebrated lord keeper, Sir Nicholas Bacon, and another to the eminent chief justice, Sir John Holt, both of whom resided here. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. Cardinal Wolsey was rector of the parish in 1506.

Redhill

REDHILL, an ecclesiastical district, in the union of Havant, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2½ miles (N. by E.) from Havant. The church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, was consecrated in July, 1838, and is a neat cruciform structure, erected at an expense of £600, and containing 272 sittings, of which 232 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £60 per annum, with a neat residence; and is in the gift of the Incumbents of Havant and Warblington, alternately.

Redisham, or Redisham Magna (St. Peter)

REDISHAM, or Redisham Magna (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Halesworth; containing 165 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the impropriator, the Earl of Gosford, with a net income of £50: the tithes have been commuted for £100. The church is chiefly in the early English style of architecture, with a rich Norman doorway on the south.

Redisham Parva.—See Ringsfield.

REDISHAM PARVA.—See Ringsfield.

Redlingfield

REDLINGFIELD, a parish, in the parliamentary borough of Eye, union and hundred of Hartismere, W. division of Suffolk, 3½ miles (S. E.) from Eye; containing 240 inhabitants. A Benedictine nunnery in honour of St. Andrew, was founded here in 1120, by Manasses, Earl of Ghisness, and Emma, his wife; the revenue, at the Dissolution, was valued at £81. 2. 5. The remains have been converted into a farmhouse. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £71; patron and impropriator, William Adair, Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for £251. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, with a low tower.

Redlynch

REDLYNCH, a chapelry, in the parish and hundred of Bruton, union of Wincanton, E. division of Somerset, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Bruton; containing 69 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £59; patron and impropriator, Sir H. R. Hoare, Bart. The chapel, which is of plain architecture, and dedicated to St. Peter, was originally a chapel of ease to Bruton. Redlynch gives the inferior title of Baron to the Earl of Ilchester.

Redmain, with Isell, Cumberland.—See Isell.

REDMAIN, with Isell, Cumberland.—See Isell.

Redmarley

REDMARLEY, a hamlet, in the parish of Great Witley, union of Martley, Lower division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester; containing 56 inhabitants, and comprising 2620 acres of land.

Redmarley-D'abitot (St. Bartholomew)

REDMARLEY-D'ABITOT (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Newent, and in a detached portion of the Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Upton and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 5½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Ledbury; containing 981 inhabitants. The parish is situated at the southern extremity of the county, being bounded on the west and south by Gloucestershire, and is on the road from Gloucester to Ledbury. It comprises by measurement 3760 acres. One-half of the soil is sand, and the other clay; the surface of the former portion is hilly, and of the latter level. There are three quarries of redsandstone, which is chiefly used for the repair of roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 10. 7½., and in the gift of the Niblet family: the tithes have been commuted for £915, and the glebe comprises 63 acres. The church is a plain edifice, with a substantial tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Red-Marshall (St. Cuthbert)

RED-MARSHALL (St. Cuthbert), a parish, partly in the union of Stockton, and partly in that of Sedgefield, S. W. division of Stockton ward, S. division of the county of Durham; containing, with the chapelries of Carleton and Stillington, 272 inhabitants, of whom 48 are in Red-Marshall township, 4½ miles (W. N. W.) from Stockton. This place anciently belonged to the see of Durham, and was given by Bishop Anthony Beck to his brother John, baron of Eresby in Lincolnshire, who sold it to the Moultons, from whom it passed in the 14th century to the Lisles and Langtons. Since that time the families of Claxton, Morley, Place, Bromley, Spearman, and Vane, have, with others, held property here. The parish comprises 3358a. 19p., of which 956 acres are in the township; of the latter, 693 are arable, 244 pasture, 9 wood, and 4 common and roads: the surface is slightly undulated, and the soil clay, producing chiefly wheat. The Clarence railway passes through the township of Carleton. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 18. 1½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Durham: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £377, with a glebe of 6½ acres; and £56. 7. are paid to Sherburn Hospital. The church has a Norman arch leading into the chancel: on the south side are three stone stalls, opposite to which is an arched recess; and in the south porch are two recumbent figures, supposed to represent a male and female of the family of Claxton. The rectory-house appears to have been once fortified; an embattled tower was lately remaining, but it has been modernised.

Redmile (St. Peter)

REDMILE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Grantham, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 9 miles (W.) from Grantham; containing 518 inhabitants. The parish is intersected on the north-west side by the canal between Grantham and Nottingham. It comprises by measurement about 1700 acres, of which the portions of arable and pasture are nearly equal; the surface is generally flat, and the soil clay, on a lias formation. The lands stretch below the well-wooded ridge of hills on which Belvoir Castle stands. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 9. 2.; net income, £391; patron, the Duke of Rutland. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1792.

Redmire

REDMIRE, a chapelry, in the parish of Wensley, union of Leybourn, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 6¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Middleham; containing 288 inhabitants. The lead-mines formerly in operation here have been almost exhausted, but calamine is got in abundance, and in the neighbourhood coal is obtained. In the chapelry is a fine spring strongly impregnated with sulphur, with a convenient well for bathing. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to that of Bolton-Castle: the chapel is dedicated to St. Mary. The tithes have been commuted for £184, and the rectorial glebe here consists of an acre and a half. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a free school, founded in 1725 by the Rev. Thomas Baynes, who endowed it with lands now producing an income of about £19.

Redruth (St. Uny)

REDRUTH (St. Uny), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Penwith, W. division of Cornwall, 53 miles (S. W. by W.) from Launceston, and 262¾ (W. S. W.) from London; containing 9305 inhabitants. This ancient town, at one time called Uny, from the saint to whom its church is dedicated, appears to have existed previously to the division of the kingdom into parishes; and to have been a central place for the celebration of the religious rites of the Britons, from which circumstance it received the appellation of Dre Druth, or "the Druids' town," now modified into Redruth. The town is pleasantly situated on the declivity of a hill, on the great road from Truro to Penzance, and in the heart of a rich mining district; it consists principally of one long street indifferently paved, is lighted with gas, and supplied with water from a spring near Trefula. A subscription reading-room is supported. The prosperity of Redruth, and the rapid increase of its population, have arisen from the opening of some extensive tin and copper mines in the neighbourhood, the produce of which is said to realise nearly one million sterling per annum: sales of copper-ore by ticket take place on Thursday. A large brewery is carried on; and a vast quantity of candles is made, chiefly for the use of the miners. A railroad has been constructed under the provisions of an act obtained in 1824, extending from the town to Point Quay in Restrongett creek, St. Feock, a distance of nine miles, for facilitating the conveyance of the ore for exportation, and of timber and coal for the supply of the mines. In 1846 an act was passed for a railway from the Cornwall railway near Truro, by Redruth, to Penzance, with a branch from Redruth to the Cornwall line a little north of Penryn: this line from Truro to Penzance includes a railway formed a few years ago between Redruth and Hayle. The markets are on Tuesday and Friday, the latter being the principal day; and the fairs, chiefly for cattle, are on Easter-Tuesday, May 2nd, August 3rd, and October 12th. The tolls and dues of the markets, and of the May and August fairs, belong to the successor of the late Lord de Dunstanville, by whom a neat market-house, with shambles and other buildings, was erected. At the entrance of the market-place, a handsome stone tower supported on arches, with a clock having four dial-plates, of which the east and west are illuminated, has been built at the expense of the parishioners. The powers of the county debt-court of Redruth, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Redruth.

The parish comprises 3930 acres, of which 1700 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the patronage of Lady Basset: the tithes have been commuted for £480. The church, situated near Cairn-Brea Hill, at the distance of half a mile from the town, was rebuilt in the year 1770. A church in the later English style, was erected in 1828, at an expense of £2367, by grant from the Parliamentary Commissioners: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rector. A church district named Treleigh was endowed in 1846 by the Ecclesiastical Commission: the living is in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Exeter, alternately. There are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans. The poor-law union of Redruth comprises eight parishes or places, and contains a population of 48,062. Numerous vestiges of its ancient occupation by the Druids are found in the immediate neighbourhood of the town, consisting of circles, erect stones, basins, cromlechs, cairns, and other relics; and on the eastern side of Cairn-Brea Hill are the ruins of a castle, which appears to have been of very great antiquity. The application of gas to domestic purposes was first made here by Mr. Murdoch, by whom it was soon afterwards introduced with success into the Soho manufactory, near Birmingham.

Redwick

REDWICK, a tything, in the parish of Henbury, union of Thornbury, Lower division of the hundred of Henbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (S. W. by W.) from Thornbury; containing, with the chapelry of Northwick, 256 inhabitants. A school is supported by endowment,

Redwick (St. Thomas)

REDWICK (St. Thomas), a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 8 miles (E. by S.) from Newport; containing 300 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the Bristol Channel, which bounds it on the south; and contains about 2200 acres, consisting chiefly of a sandy loam. The living is a vicarage, annexed to that of Magor; the glebe comprises one acre. The church is an ancient structure having a nave and chancel, with a central tower. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Redworth

REDWORTH, a township, in the parish of Heighington, union of Darlington, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 7 miles (N. N. W.) from Darlington; containing 351 inhabitants. Redworth House, surrounded by plantations, is the seat of Robert Surtees, Esq., whose family have for centuries been connected with the county, and who is a relative of its historian. The tithes have been commuted for £35. 19., payable to the vicar, and £54. 10. to the Bishop of Chester. Here are the remains of a Danish fortification called Shackleton, surrounded with triple embankments.

Reed (St. Mary)

REED (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Royston, hundred of Odsey, county of Hertford, 1¾ mile (W. by N.) from Barkway; containing 260 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Barkway consolidated in 1800, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Harcourt family; net income, £512. The tithes were commuted for land under an inclosure act, in 1801. The church has a square embattled tower of flint.

Reedham (St. John the Baptist)

REEDHAM (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Blofield, hundred of Walsham, E. division of Norfolk, 6 miles (S. by E.) from Acle; containing 614 inhabitants. The Danish king Lothbroc, when driven by stress of weather upon the coast of East Anglia, landed at this place, and was murdered by Bern, huntsman to King Edmund, who then kept his court here. The parish comprises 3282a. 1r. 9p., of which 1057 acres are arable, 2104 marsh and pasture, 37 common lately inclosed, 21 public road, and 43 water, exclusively of Wilton green, which contains 7½ acres. There is a ferry over the navigable river Yare on the south. The Norwich and Yarmouth railway passes through the parish; and here branches off the Lowestoft railway, 11½ miles long. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Freethorpe annexed, valued in the king's books at £18; net income, £607; patron, J. F. Leathes, Esq.: the glebe consists of about 96 acres, with a commodious parsonage-house, considerably improved by the Rev. F. Leathes. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with an embattled tower. Here is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.

Reedly-Hallows.—See Booth, New Laund.

REEDLY-HALLOWS.—See Booth, New Laund.

Reedness

REEDNESS, a township, in the parish of Whitgift, union of Goole, Lower division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 6 miles (S. E. by S.) from Howden; containing 633 inhabitants. The township is situated on the river Ouse, across which is a ferry to Saltmarsh, belonging to the Bishop of Durham. It comprises by computation 2500 acres, of which more than 400 are warp grounds, lately reclaimed from the river. The tithes of the township, and of Swinefleet, were commuted for land in 1759. Here is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.

Reepham (St. Peter and St. Paul)

REEPHAM (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 4¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Lincoln; containing 341 inhabitants. It comprises 1837 acres, of which 26 are common or waste land. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Mercers' Company, London, the impropriators: the great tithes have been commuted for £238. 13., and those of the vicar for £119. 10.; there are 15½ acres of vicarial glebe.

Reepham (All Saints).—See Hackford.

REEPHAM (All Saints).—See Hackford.

Reepham (St. Mary)

REEPHAM (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of Eynsford, E. division of Norfolk, 12 miles (N. W. by N.) from Norwich, and 116 (N. E. by N.) from London; containing, exclusively of certain portions of the town in the parishes of Kerdiston, Hackford, and Whitwell, 389 inhabitants. This place, anciently called Refham, gave name to a family, one of whom was mayor of London in 1310. The parish comprises, with Kerdiston, 2427a. 3r. 1p., of which 1643 acres are arable, 727 pasture and meadow, and 56 woodland. The town is situated principally in the parish of Hackford, near the small river Eyne, and is neat and well built; in the market-place are several good houses. The chief trade is in malt, and there is a large brewery, noted for its ale: the market, obtained by charter of Edward I., is on Wednesday, and mostly for corn and swine; and there is a fair for horses, cattle, and toys, on June 29th. Petty-sessions are held every alternate Monday. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Kerdiston united, valued in the king's books at £18. 1. 0½., and in the patronage of Trinity College, Cambridge: the tithes of Reepham and Kerdiston have been commuted for £816, and there is a glebe of 62 acres, with a good house. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, with a square tower on the south side. It once contained a celebrated image of the Virgin, which was much enriched by offerings. In the chancel, which has lately been new roofed, is a handsome monument of a Knight Templar, supposed to be of the Kerdiston family; also several sepulchral brasses, one of which, to the memory of W. de Kerdiston and his lady, is well worthy of notice. There were formerly three churches within a single inclosure, one for Reepham St. Mary and two for the lordships of Whitwell and Hackford: that belonging to Hackford was taken down in 1790, with the exception of a part of the west gable; that of Whitwell, now used for Hackford and Whitwell, is in the later English style, with an embattled tower, and was thoroughly repaired in 1834. The Baptists and Wesleyans have places of worship. Richard Westall, R.A., was a native of Reepham.

Reeth

REETH, a market-town, in the parish of Grinton, union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 9¼ miles (W. by S.) from Richmond; containing 1343 inhabitants. The town is situated on elevated ground, at a short distance from the confluence of the rivers Arkle and Swale, and commands a beautiful view of the adjacent country; it is nearly quadrangular, and is irregularly built. The township comprises 5659 acres, of which 2783 are common or waste land: leadmines are in extensive operation, upwards of 6000 tons being annually produced. The market, granted by charter in the 6th of William and Mary, is on Friday; and fairs are held on the Friday before Good Friday, on Old May-day, Old Midsummer-day, the festival of St. Bartholomew, Old Martinmas-day, and St. Thomas' day. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. The Friends' school here was erected at the expense of George and John Raw, and is endowed with £66 per annum; there is also a school endowed in 1643 by Alderman Hutchinson, and at Fremington a national school has been established. Opposite to Healaugh, in the township, on Harker Hill, are the remains of an intrenchment 100 feet square, called Maiden's Castle; and on the east side of the hill and in the dale are other intrenchments, in one of which some pieces of armour have been found. They are supposed to be Roman.



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