Rock - Rodsley

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

686-690

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'Rock - Rodsley', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 686-690. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51242 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Rock

ROCK, a chapelry, in the parish of Embleton, union of Alnwick, S. division of Bambrough ward, N. division of Northumberland, 4¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Alnwick; containing 227 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres, of which the greater part is arable; the lands are interspersed with plantations, and the scenery embraces fine sea-views, and views of Bambrough Castle, Dunston, and Holy Island. Limestone and sandstone are obtained, and there is coal, but not at present wrought. Rock Hall, the seat of the Bosanquet family, owners of the soil, was repaired and enlarged some years since; the remaining portion of the old mansion, covered with ivy, has a venerable appearance. The great north road runs through the township. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Embleton; net income, £50. The chapel, dedicated to St. Philip and St. James, consists of a nave and chancel, with a Saxon doorway, and contains a handsome monument to Col. Salkeld, a former proprietor of the place; the edifice was repaired in 1805. Curious fossils have been dug up from the limestone-quarry.

Rock (St. Peter and St. Paul)

ROCK (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Cleobury-Mortimer, Lower division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Bewdley; containing, with the chapelry of Heightington, 1397 inhabitants. The parish comprises 7400 acres, and is situated near the right bank of the river Severn: the roads from Tenbury to Kidderminster and from Cleobury-Mortimer to Worcester cross each other here, at a place called the Finger Post. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 11. 8., and in the patronage of the family of Severne; net income, £1100. At Heightington is a chapel of ease. A free grammar school was established by Edward VI., who endowed it with £5. 14. per annum, which is regularly paid out of the crown rent; another school is partly supported by some ladies. An almshouse for six widows was endowed with £20 per annum, by the Rev. Dr. Walls, in 1724.

Rockbeare (St. Mary)

ROCKBEARE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of East Budleigh, Woodbury and S. divisions of Devon, 7 miles (E.) from Exeter; containing 513 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Exeter to Honiton, and comprises by computation 1500 acres, of which about 700 are arable, 500 pasture, and 300 common. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £148; patron, the Bishop of Exeter; impropriators, T. Porter, Esq., and others: the glebe comprises about 20 acres. The church is a plain edifice. There is a place of worship for dissenters.

Rockburne (St. Andrew)

ROCKBURNE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Fordingbridge, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Fordingbridge; containing 469 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 3798 acres. The soil is partly clay, but chiefly a chalky loam; the surface is hilly, and about 1000 acres are down land, similar to that of Salisbury Plain, of which the parish may be considered as the southern boundary. The living is a donative, in the patronage of Lady Coote; impropriator, the Rev. W. J. Yonge: the tithes have been commuted for £675, and there is a glebe of 116 acres. The church is an ancient structure; the chancel was rebuilt by Lady Coote in 1830. The Baptists have a place of worship. Sir Eyre Coote, the captor of Pondicherry, in the East Indies, and his nephew, bearing the same name and title, both distinguished soldiers, resided and were buried here. There are some remains of an old chapel, with a very ancient doorway.

Rockcliff

ROCKCLIFF, a parish, in the union of Carlisle, ward and E. division of Cumberland; containing 824 inhabitants, of whom 353 are in the township of ChurchTown, 4¾ miles (N. W.) from Carlisle. The parish comprises 4017 acres, of which 1384 are common or waste land. It is bounded on the north by the river Esk, on the north-west by the Solway Frith, and on the southwest by the river Eden, which is navigable to the village of Rockcliff, situated to the east of Port Carlisle. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. Within reach of the tide is a remarkable spring, with a scum floating on its surface, which turns paper to a complete golden hue.

Rockcliff, Castle

ROCKCLIFF, CASTLE, a township, in the parish of Rockcliff, union of Carlisle, ward and E. division of Cumberland, 5 miles (N. W.) from Carlisle; containing 471 inhabitants. The river Eden is here crossed by an iron bridge of three arches, on the road to Gretna-Green, three miles distant. Some remains are still visible of a small castle built by the lords Dacre, which was garrisoned by Leonard Dacre, when in rebellion against Elizabeth, in 1570, and was taken by Lord Hunsdon for the queen.

Rock-Ferry

ROCK-FERRY, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Bebington, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 1 mile (S.) from Birkenhead, and 21/8 miles (S. S. W.), by water, from Liverpool. About twenty years ago, a large tract of land here was purchased, together with the right of ferry across the Mersey, by a gentleman of Liverpool, who much improved the ferry, built a large and excellent pier, formed roads, and encouraged the erection of buildings. A company was subsequently established, by whom the Hotel was enlarged to its present extent; new pleasure-grounds were added, and more commodious ferry-boats were employed. Several members of the company purchased lands on the margin of the river, and these, with others, were formed into a park, planted, and laid out in a picturesque manner. No part of the shores of the Mersey has since undergone a more rapid or pleasing transformation. The district comprises about 500 acres, of a stiff clay soil, and is chiefly laid out for the country residences of the Liverpool merchants, professional gentlemen, &c. The allotment called Rock Park contains a number of substantial mansions, and is embanked by an esplanade to which the river flows up at high water, and which forms a delightful promenade: to the west is Highfield Park, also consisting of detached houses; and on the south is a large plot of land laid out for villas. The river has a lake-like appearance at high water towards the southeast, at which point the views include Aigburth, Speke, Runcorn, Delamere Forest, Beeston Castle, &c.; while on the north-east is seen the town of Liverpool, with the entire range of docks and piers to the mouth of the Mersey. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Trustees, with a net income of £160, and a house: first and present incumbent, the Rev. Thos. F. Redhead. The church, dedicated to St. Peter, was erected in 1841–42, at a cost of £3500, and is a cruciform structure in the Romanesque style, with a tower and spire, forming an interesting object from the river: the interior is very neat, and the east window and transept windows are of painted glass.

Rockfield (St. Kenelm)

ROCKFIELD (St. Kenelm), a parish, in the hundred of Skenfreth, union, division, and county of Monmouth, 2 miles (N. W.) from Monmouth; containing 270 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the northeast, with the exception of a very small portion, by the river Monnow, and is intersected by the old road from Monmouth to Abergavenny. It comprises by computation 1993 acres, of which 1034 are arable, 797 pasture or meadow, and 162 woodland; the surface is considerably undulated, and the views from the higher grounds are extensive and picturesque. Rough stone for farmbuilding, and for roads, abounds. Perthyre House, here, is an ancient moated mansion. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 3. 1½., and in the patronage of the Rev. John Harding (the impropriator), with a net income of £43: the great tithes have been commuted for £198. 4., and the vicarial for £19. 15. 6. The church, an old edifice with a low tower, was thoroughly repaired and repewed in 1842.

Rockhampton (St. Oswald)

ROCKHAMPTON (St. Oswald), a parish, in the union of Thornbury, Lower division of the hundred of Langley and Swinehead, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Thornbury; containing 208 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1207a. 35p. of land. The soil for the most part is clay and sand, and about 200 acres are boggy; the surface is in some places hilly, and where flat, much subject to flood: there are plantations of oak, ash, and elm. The road from Bristol to Gloucester passes at the distance of a mile from the church, and the parish is bounded on the west by the river Severn. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the gift of the Rev. Mr. Tufnell: the tithes have been commuted for £283, and there are nearly 21 acres of glebe.

Rockingham (St. Leonard)

ROCKINGHAM (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 25 miles (N. N. E.) from Northampton; containing 291 inhabitants. This place, which is situated in the forest of Rockingham, is of considerable antiquity: a castle was erected by William I., on the summit of a hill, for the protection of the extensive iron-works at that time carried on in the adjacent woodlands. In 1094, a grand council of the barons, bishops, and clergy, was held here, for the purpose of settling the differences which had arisen between William Rufus and Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, respecting the right of episcopal investiture. During the war in the reign of Charles I., the castle was garrisoned for the king by Sir Lewis Watson, afterwards created Lord Rockingham, and was besieged by the parliamentarian forces, who at the same time destroyed the tower and part of the nave of the church: the only remains of the castle are the two massive bastions that defended the entrance gateway.

The parish comprises 887a. 2r. 21p., of which 112 acres are arable, 234 forest, 76 wood, 65 meadow, and 379 inclosed pasture; the soil, for the most part, is a strong clay. The village, formerly a market-town, is situated at the base of the hill on which the castle stood, and on the right bank of the Welland, which is here crossed by a bridge. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 2. 3½., and in the patronage of the Hon. Richard Watson, the present proprietor of Rockingham Castle: the tithes have been commuted for £150, and a neat parsonage-house has been recently built by the patron. The church is a neat structure in the early and later English styles: in the chancel is the mausoleum of Lord Sondes. A spacious school has been built at the expense of Mr. Watson, by whom it is entirely supported; it affords instruction to 80 boys and 40 girls of this and the neighbouring parishes.

Rockland (St. Mary)

ROCKLAND (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 5½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Norwich; containing 473 inhabitants. It comprises 1257a. 3r. 26p. of land, whereof 850 acres are arable, 25 pasture, 315 marsh, 10 woodland, and 56 garden and glebe: the clay found in the parish is of excellent quality for bricks, of which great quantities are made. Here is a lake of 100 acres, navigable to the river Yare. The living is a rectory, with a mediety of the rectory of Holverstone consolidated, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the gift of Queen's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and a modus of £5. 5. is received for Holverstone; the glebe comprises 33 acres, with a house erected in 1839 by the Rev. T. Dewé. The church is principally in the early and decorated English styles. In the burial-ground are some slight remains of a second parish church, dedicated to St. Margaret.

Rockland (All Saints)

ROCKLAND (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wayland, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 3¾ miles (W. by N.) from Attleburgh; containing 352 inhabitants. The joint parishes of Rockland All Saints and St. Andrew comprise 1630a. 3r. 4p. The living is a discharged rectory, with the livings of Caston and Rockland St. Andrew, and valued in the king's books at £10. 19. 4½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. B. Barker. The income is about £1002; the glebe comprises 31 acres, and the rector receives a rentcharge of £6. 15. out of the tithes of Rockland St. Peter. The church is an ancient structure in the early, decorated, and later English styles, with a square tower. The poor have 28 acres of land, allotted at the inclosure. The union workhouse is in the parish.

Rockland (St. Andrew)

ROCKLAND (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Wayland, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (W.) from Attleburgh; containing 124 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Rockland All Saints: the church has long been a ruin, and only part of the tower is left.

Rockland (St. Peter)

ROCKLAND (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wayland, W. division of Norfolk, 4¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Attleburgh; containing 392 inhabitants. It comprises 999a. 1r. 38p., of which 838 acres are arable, and 160 meadow and pasture. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 16. 5½., and in the gift of the incumbent, the Rev. H. Bird: the tithes have been commuted for £260, and the glebe comprises 20 acres, with a handsome parsonage-house in the Elizabethan style, erected in 1841. The church is an ancient structure in the early and later English styles, with a circular tower. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans. At the inclosure, fifteen acres were allotted to the poor.

Rock-Savage, Cheshire.—See Clifton.

ROCK-SAVAGE, Cheshire.—See Clifton.

Rocliffe

ROCLIFFE, a township, in the parish of Aldborough, Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 1¾ mile (W. S. W.) from Boroughbridge; containing 239 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1900 acres; clay of good quality for brick-making is found, and there are works for the manufacture of bricks and tiles. The village is on the south side of the river Ure. A church, dedicated to St. Mary, was erected in 1844, by Andrew Lawson, Esq., by whom it has been in great part endowed.

Rod, with Little Brampton and Nash

ROD, with Little Brampton and Nash, a township, in the parish of Presteign, union of Knighton, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Presteign; containing 162 inhabitants. The township comprises 1968 acres, and is watered by a tributary of the river Lugg, and intersected by the roads from Presteign to Hereford and to New Radnor.

Rodborne

RODBORNE, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and hundred of Malmesbury, Malmesbury and Kingswood, and N. divisions of Wilts, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Malmesbury; containing 139 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to the Holy Rood.

Rodborne-Cheney (St. Mary)

RODBORNE-CHENEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Swindon and N. divisions of Wilts, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Swindon; containing, with the tythings of Even Swindon, Haydon, and Moredon, 838 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2700 acres of land, and abounds with limestone, which is quarried for burning into lime. The Cheltenham and Great Western railway, and the North Wiltshire canal, which connects the Wilts and Berks line of navigation with the Thames and Severn canal, pass through the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £17; net income, £96; patron and impropriator, the Rev. A. Evans: the glebe consists of 21 acres. The church is an ancient structure with a central tower, and has evidently been of much greater dimensions. There is a place of worship for Independents; also a school endowed with £20 per annum.

Rodborough (Holy Trinity)

RODBOROUGH (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Stroud, hundred of Longtree, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 1 mile (S. W. by W.) from Stroud; containing 2147 inhabitants. This parish comprises by measurement 1380 acres, whereof 300 are arable, 600 meadow and pasture, and 480 wood and common. Its surface is varied with hills and valleys; the soil on the high lands is thin, but in the valleys forms luxuriant pasture, and the prevailing scenery is picturesque. The village is situated on the south bank of the river Stroud; the manufacture of woollen-cloth is carried on extensively at six mills. The living is a rectory, lately formed, in the gift of D. Ricards, Esq.; income, £300. Here is also a morning lectureship, endowed with land by Edmund de Rodborough and Hugh de Noteling, and in the patronage of Brasenose College, Oxford. The Independents have a place of worship; and a school is endowed with thirty-four acres of land, and with the interest of £770 in the funds. Richard Clutterbuck, who, though blind, was endowed with an extraordinary mechanical genius; and Sir Andrew Halliday, physician to the king, and whose ancestors for 700 years resided here, were natives of the parish.

Roddam

RODDAM, a township, in the parish of Ilderton, union of Glendale, N. division of Coquetdale ward and of Northumberland, 5½ miles (S. S. E.) from Wooler; containing 110 inhabitants. It comprises 1200 acres of land, with about 200 acres of plantation; the surface is undulated, and the soil light, with a gravelly substratum. Roddam Hall is a handsome modern mansion, standing on a bold eminence which on the north forms the bank of a deep romantic dell watered by a tributary of the Till. A stone coffin and an urn were dug up here in 1796.

Rodden

RODDEN, a parish, in the union and hundred of Frome, E. division of Somerset, 1 mile (E. by S.) from Frome, on the road to Warminster; containing 270 inhabitants. The population are chiefly employed in the manufacture of kerseymere. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £240; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Edward Edgell. The church was built by order of Archbishop Laud, in 1640, at the expense of the parishioners, and was enlarged in 1832, by the late incumbent, the Rev. J. M. Rogers, aided by a grant of £50 from the Incorporated Society.

Roddington (St. George)

RODDINGTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Wellington, Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Wellington; containing 466 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Roden, and the Shrewsbury canal. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £247. The glebe formerly comprised about 48 acres, but 13 have been sold, and the produce applied to the erection of a glebe-house. The church was rebuilt in 1798. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A rental of £17. 17., arising from legacies, is distributed among the poor.

Rode, North

RODE, NORTH, a township, in the parish of Prestbury, union and hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 3½ miles (N. E.) from Congleton; containing 287 inhabitants. The area is 1498 acres; the soil is clay. Here is a living in the gift of J. Daintry, Esq.; and a school is supported partly by an endowment of £16. 10. per annum.

Rode, Odd

RODE, ODD, a township, in the parish of Astbury, union of Congleton, hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Congleton; containing 1518 inhabitants. It comprises 3034 acres, of which the soil is sand, with rocky brine. The Grand Trunk canal passes through the township. Near the hamlet of Scholar-Green is the chapel of Holy Trinity, built many years ago by Mr. Dobbs, and lately purchased by Mr. Wilbraham, of Rode Hall. A rent-charge of £379. 5. has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes. Schools for boys and girls are supported partly by endowment, and partly by the liberality of the family of Wilbraham.

Roding, county of Essex.—See Roothing.

RODING, county of Essex.—See Roothing.

Rodmarton (St. Peter)

RODMARTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Longtree, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (W. S. W.) from Cirencester; containing, with the tything of Calkerton, 431 inhabitants. It comprises nearly 4000 acres. The soil is chiefly light, with good pasture for sheep, and a small portion of rich meadow land; the surface is generally flat, with some slight undulations. The substratum abounds with stone of the oolite formation, which is quarried for inferior buildings. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 1. 3.; net income, £476; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Samuel Lysons. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1792; the glebe altogether comprises nearly 600 acres. The church is an ancient structure, with a tower surmounted by a spire. The Akeman-street passed near the south-eastern boundary of the parish; and in a field called Hocbery, a tessellated pavement, with coins of Antoninus and Valentinian was discovered in 1636. A farmhouse at Hasleden, in the parish, is supposed to have been a monastery; and attached to the old manorhouse at Tarlton are the remains of a chapel. Samuel Lysons, author of the splendid work on Roman antiquities entitled Reliquiæ Britanniæ Romanæ, was born here in 1763: his brother the Rev. Daniel Lysons, author of the Environs of London, was also a native, and rector of the parish. The Magna Britannia was their joint performance.

Rodmell (St. Peter)

RODMELL (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Newhaven, hundred of Holmstrow, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Lewes; containing 360 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the river Ouse, and comprises by estimation 1882a. 1r., of which 1100 acres are meadow and pasture, and 782 arable; the soil is generally a hazel loam, and the surface hilly. The road from Lewes to Newhaven passes through the parish, which is also intersected by a branch of the Ermin-street. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 6. 0½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Chichester; the tithes have been commuted for £480. The church is principally in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, and some remains of Norman architecture. There was formerly a chapel at Northese.

Rodmersham (St. Nicholas)

RODMERSHAM (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Milton, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Sittingbourne; containing 328 inhabitants. It consists of 1231 acres, of which 135 are in wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 8.; patrons, the Drawbridge family. The great tithes have been commuted for £412, and the vicarial for £142; the glebe comprises 5 acres. The church is a large and handsome edifice in the early English style, with an embattled tower built of square bricks; in the chancel are four elegant canopied stalls.

Rodney-Stoke.—See Stoke, Rodney.

RODNEY-STOKE.—See Stoke, Rodney.

Rodsley

RODSLEY, a hamlet, in the parish of Longford, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (S. S. E.) from Ashbourn; containing 207 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £61. 10. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.



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