Ruscomb - Ruswarp

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

717-719

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'Ruscomb - Ruswarp', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 717-719. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51250 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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Ruscomb (St. James)

RUSCOMB (St. James), a parish, in the union of Wokingham, hundred of Sonning, county of Berks, 5½ miles (E. N. E.) from Reading; containing 202 inhabitants. It comprises 1239a. 1r. 12p., and is intersected by the Great Western railway. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Bishop of Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £275. In the chancel of the church lie buried the remains of Lord Chief Justice Eyre, who occasionally resided here. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Rushall (St. Mary)

RUSHALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Depwade, hundred of Earsham, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (W.) from Harleston; containing 267 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1000 acres: the village consists only of a few scattered dwellings. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4; patron, Joseph Sewell, Esq.; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for £300, and the vicarial for £103; the impropriate glebe consists of 69 acres, and the vicarial of 9. The church is in the later English style, with a circular tower of more ancient date. A farmhouse here is called the Priory, from having belonged to the priory of Buckenham.

Rushall (St. Michael)

RUSHALL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Walsall, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 1 mile (N. E. by N.) from Walsall; containing 1609 inhabitants. It comprises an area of 1920a. 1r. 14p., of which the soil is partly light, but mostly a strong clay; the surface is undulated, in some places hilly, and the substratum contains limestone and ironstone, the former of which is worked to some extent, several lime-works being carried on. The village is situated on the road leading from Walsall to Lichfield; and the Wyrley and Essington canal, now merged into the old Birmingham canal, passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 5.; patrons, William L. and George Mellish, Esqrs., who are lords of the manor; net income, £304, with a good glebe-house, enlarged in 1843. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £170. 1., and the glebe comprises 46 acres: 24 acres in Aston parish, producing £60 per annum, were purchased by Queen Anne's Bounty. The church was repaired in 1828 at an expense of £600, raised by subscription; it contains some old monuments to the Leigh family, of whom Edward Leigh, author of Critica Sacra and several other works, died in 1677, and was buried in the chancel. A national school is supported by subscription. Here are the ruined walls of an ancient castellated mansion.

Rushall (St. Matthew)

RUSHALL (St. Matthew), a parish, in the union of Pewsey, hundred of Swanborough, Everley and Pewsey, and N. divisions of Wilts, 3½ miles (S. W.) from Pewsey; containing 283 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 11. 8.; net income, £390; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Christ-Church College, Oxford. There is a place of worship for Baptists; and a school is supported.

Rushbrooke (St. Nicholas)

RUSHBROOKE (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Thingoe, hundred of Thedwastry, W. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (S. E. by E.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 175 inhabitants. Rushbrooke Hall, anciently the seat of the Jermyns, afterwards of the Davers family, and now of Robert Rushbrooke, Esq., is a handsome mansion, built in the reign of Elizabeth, and situated in an extensive park. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Bradfield St. George, and valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 5½.: the tithes have been commuted for £260. Thomas, Lord Jermyn, in 1700 founded almshouses for one poor man and three women; and others were erected in 1724, by Sir Jermyn Davers, Bart., for four persons.

Rushbury (St. Peter)

RUSHBURY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Church-Stretton, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 4¾ miles (E. S. E.) from Church-Stretton; containing 502 inhabitants. This is presumed to be the site of the Roman station Bravinium, situated between Old Radnor and Worcester. A market and a fair, granted by Edward I., were formerly held here. The parish comprises 3606 acres, of which 50 are common land lately inclosed. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 7. 8½.; net income, £449; patron, the Bishop of Worcester. The tithes of the parish, exclusive of the township of Gretton, have been commuted for £344, and the glebe consists of 50 acres. A school and two almshouses were erected pursuant to the will of Dr. Benjamin Wainwright, who bequeathed £1200 for their endowment; the building cost £500.

Rushden (St. Mary)

RUSHDEN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Buntingford, hundred of Odsey, county of Hertford, 4¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Buntingford; containing 318 inhabitants. It comprises 1451a. 2r. 23p., of which 924 acres are arable, 399 meadow and pasture, and 127 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 10½.; net income, £141; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. The church contains a handsome monument to Sir Adolphus Meetkerke, removed in 1754 from the church of St. Botolph, Aldersgate; also a memorial to William Love, a servant in the Meetkerke family, who left £233. 6. 8. three per cents. for a Sunday school.

Rushden (St. Mary)

RUSHDEN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Higham-Ferrers, N. division of the county of Northampton, 1½ mile (S.) from Higham-Ferrers; containing 1311 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the road from Bedford to Kettering, and comprises 3631a. 35p.; the substratum contains blue limestone, which is quarried for building and for the roads. The manufacture of shoes affords employment to about 200 persons: about 300 women and children are occupied in making pillow-lace, and a considerable trade is carried on in coal, timber, and corn, by means of the river Nene which flows through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 3., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £193. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1778; the glebe altogether contains 400 acres of land, of inferior quality. The church is a large and handsome cruciform structure, partaking of the different styles of English architecture; the tower, a fine specimen of the later style, is surmounted by an elegant crocketed spire. The transepts are in the decorated style, and in the chancel are three early English stalls; there are some remains of screen-work, and some ancient stained glass. The General and Particular Baptists, and the Wesleyans, have places of worship. Daniel Whitby, a learned Scripture commentator, and writer on controversial divinity, was born here in 1637, during the incumbency of his father.

Rushford (St. John the Evangelist)

RUSHFORD (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Thetford, partly in the hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, but chiefly in the hundred of Guilt-Cross, W. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Thetford; containing, with Schadwell hamlet, and Snarehill extra-parochial, 200 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 2000 acres, and is intersected by the smaller river Ouse, which here separates the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. Schadwell Park, the seat of the family of Buxton, is a handsome mansion in the Elizabethan style, recently new fronted with Caen stone, and considerably enlarged; the park is richly wooded, and in the grounds is St. Chad's Well, anciently much frequented by pilgrims on their route to the shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham. The living is in the patronage of the Buxton family. The church was originally a cruciform structure, of which only the tower and nave are remaining. It is in the early English style, and was most probably the church of a college established here about 1342 by Sir Edmund de Gonville, founder of Gonville Hall, Cambridge, and which at the Dissolution was valued at £85. 15. per annum. The parsonage-house occupies part of the site of the college. Roman urns, containing ashes and bones, have been found in the grounds of the park; and at Snarehill are some tumuli which mark the spot where a sanguinary battle took place in 871, between Edmund, King of East Anglia, and the Danes.

Rushmere (St. Andrew)

RUSHMERE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, partly in the borough of Ipswich, and partly in the hundred of Carlford, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N. E. by E.) from Ipswich; containing, with the hamlet of Wicks-Ufford, 564 inhabitants. This parish comprises about 1900 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 6. 8.; net income, £156; patron and impropriator, the Marquess of Bristol. The church is of the Norman period, with subsequent additions.

Rushmere (All Saints)

RUSHMERE (All Saints), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (S. W.) from Lowestoft; containing 134 inhabitants. It comprises 759a. 3r. 1p., of which about 10 acres are roads and waste. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Irby family: the tithes have been commuted for £210, and the glebe comprises 7 acres. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with a round tower.

Rushock (St. Michael)

RUSHOCK (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Kidderminster, Lower division of the hundred of Halfshire, Kidderminster and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 5½ miles (W. by N.) from Bromsgrove; containing 155 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Kidderminster to Droitwich, and comprises 1218a. 3r. 30p., whereof three-fourths are arable, and the remainder pasture and meadow; the soil is fertile, producing much corn and fruit. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £280. The church stands on an eminence, and has a tower. William Norris, in 1702, bequeathed a house and some land in support of a school.

Rushton

RUSHTON, a township, in the parish of Tarpor ley, union of Nantwich, First division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of Cheshire, 2½ miles (E. N E.) from Tarporley; containing 301 inhabitants. It comprises 1700 acres, of which the soil is chiefly clay, with sand.

Rushton

RUSHTON, in the union of Kettering, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2¼ miles (N. E.) from Rothwell; containing, with part of the hamlet of Pipewell, 497 inhabitants. The district is intersected by a branch of the river Nene, and contains 3013a. 1r. 11p. of land. The Hall here is a fine old building erected by the Treshams, a family of consideration in the time of Elizabeth: at one extremity of the park is a curious triangular lodge, which is almost unique. Rushton comprises the parishes of All Saints and St. Peter, both rectories, the former valued in the king's books at £10. 12. 1. and the latter at £11. 13. 4., and together in the patronage of W. W. Hope, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £650, and there is a glebe of 107 acres.

Rushton-Grange, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill, county of Stafford.—See Cobridge.

RUSHTON-GRANGE, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill, county of Stafford.—See Cobridge.

Rushton-James

RUSHTON-JAMES, a township, in the chapelry of Rushton-Spencer, parish and union of Leek, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 5¾ miles (N. W.) from the town of Leek; containing 304 inhabitants.

Rushton-Spencer

RUSHTON-SPENCER, a township and chapelry, in the parish and union of Leek, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 5 miles (N. W. by N.) from Leek; the township containing 350 inhabitants, several of whom are engaged in the spinning of cotton. The living is a perpetual curacy; income, £91; patron, the Vicar of Leek. The chapel, dedicated to St. Lawrence, is a small stone building.

Rushulme

RUSHULME, a township, in the parish of Manchester, union of Chorlton, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 2¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Manchester; containing 1868 inhabitants. This place lies on the road from Manchester to Didsbury. Part of the Victoria Park is in the township, and the neighbourhood is adorned with numerous gentlemen's seats, among which is Platt Hall, embosomed in trees. At the rear of the Hall runs a quiet rural lane shaded by a fine row of elms, an avenue to Platt church. The sacred edifice consists of a nave, aisles, chancel, and tower, the last being placed at the south-west corner of the building; it was erected by C. T. Worsley, Esq., and consecrated in June 1846, and is in the decorated style. Birch, also in the township, has a church, which is noticed under that head; and on the east border of the township is a third church, at Longsight, which see. These three buildings are all favourable specimens of church architecture.

Rushyford

RUSHYFORD, a village, in the township of Windleston, parish of St. Andrew Auckland, union of Auckland, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 5½ miles (E. by S.) from Bishop-Auckland. This place is on the road between Darlington and Durham, and on that from Sedgefield to Bishop-Auckland, which here intersect each other. A large hotel and posting-house in the village had great celebrity previous to the introduction of railroads, and there is still a post-office for the convenience of the neighbourhood. A school was built some years since by Sir Robert Eden, Bart., by whom it was endowed with £15 per annum.

Ruskington (All Saints)

RUSKINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Sleaford, wapentake of Flaxwell, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 3¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Sleaford; containing 957 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 3600 acres. The village is situated on the old road from Sleaford to Lincoln, and is intersected by a fine stream of water; the Sleaford canal bounds the parish on the south-east. The living comprises a rectory and a discharged vicarage, the latter valued in the king's books at £3. 17. 3½.: net income of the rectory, £250; patron and incumbent, the Rev. C. J. Myers: net income of the vicarage, which is in the gift of the Crown, £102. The tithes were commuted for land, on the inclosure of the parish; the rectorial glebe comprises 247 acres, and the vicarial 66. The body of the church is ancient; the tower was rebuilt in 1620. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Lady Hodgson, in 1719, bequeathed a rent-charge of £42. 16., in support of three aged women, and a school for ten children.

Rusland

RUSLAND, a district chapelry, in the parish of Coulton, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 8½ miles (N. N. E.) from Ulverston. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £50; patron, the Incumbent of Coulton. The chapel, dedicated to St. Paul, was consecrated in 1745.

Rusper (St. Mary)

RUSPER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Horsham, hundred of Singlecross, rape of Bramber, W. division of Sussex, 5¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Horsham; containing 564 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the county of Surrey. It is pleasingly diversified with hill and dale; the soil is clay, and very favourable for the growth of timber. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 10. 10., and in the patronage of the Rev. Peter Wood, the incumbent: the tithes have been commuted for £293. 15., and there are 22 acres of glebe. The church is in the early and later English styles, and contains several ancient brasses and interesting monuments. Here are some slight remains of a priory of Black nuns, founded by Gervase of Canterbury, who flourished in the reign of Richard I.; it was dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, and possessed a revenue of £39. 13. 7.

Rustington

RUSTINGTON, a parish, in the hundred of Poling, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Littlehampton; containing 344 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south by the English Channel; and comprises by measurement 1066 acres, of which 735 are arable, 238 meadow and pasture, 49 in homesteads and gardens, and 44 in roads and waste. The soil is generally a rich loam, and the surface, though level, is sufficiently elevated to admit of perfect drainage. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £159; patron, the Bishop of Chichester; chief impropriators, the Oliver family. The great tithes have been commuted for £390, and the vicarial for £127; the glebe contains about an acre. The church is in the early English style.

Ruston, East (St. Mary)

RUSTON, EAST (St. Mary), a parish, in the Tunstead and Happing incorporation, hundred of Happing, E. division of Norfolk, 5¾ miles (E. by S.) from North Walsham; containing 759 inhabitants. It comprises about 2400 acres, of which nearly 800 are marsh, and the remainder principally arable: about 300 acres were allotted to the poor at the inclosure, for pasture and fuel. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to the rectory of Ridlington, and valued in the king's books at £11. 11. 10.; appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Windsor. The great tithes have been commuted for £940; the vicar receives a stipend of £13. 6. 8., and has a glebe of 6½ acres. The church is partly in the early and partly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. Professor Porson, so celebrated as a critic and Greek scholar, was born here in 1759.

Ruston Parva

RUSTON PARVA, a parish, in the union of Driffield, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 4¼ miles (N. E.) from Driffield; containing 172 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 950 acres. Limestone of excellent quality is found in abundance, and great quantities of it are burnt into lime, for the supply of the adjacent district. The village, which is well built, is situated close to the road from Driffield to Bridlington. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £51; patron and impropriator, W. T. St. Quintin, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1801. The church was rebuilt of white brick in 1832. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ruston, Sco (St. Michael)

RUSTON, SCO (St. Michael), a parish, in the Tunstead and Happing incorporation, hundred of Tunstead, E. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Coltishall; containing 115 inhabitants, and comprising 495a. 2r. 37p., all arable land. The living is a vicarage, annexed to that of Tunstead; impropriator, R. Johnson, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £135, and the vicarial for £52. 10. The church is an ancient structure; the tower is in ruins.

Ruswarp

RUSWARP, a township, in the parish, borough, and union of Whitby, liberty of Whitby-Strand, N. riding of York; containing 1879 inhabitants. It includes part of the suburbs of Whitby, and also the hamlet of High and Low Stakesby, near which is Sneaton Castle, a handsome mansion erected by the late Colonel Wilson. Here is a suspension bridge across the river Esk.