Sawbridgeworth - Saxton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

23-26

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'Sawbridgeworth - Saxton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 23-26. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51257 Date accessed: 23 August 2014.


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Sawbridgeworth (St. Michael)

SAWBRIDGEWORTH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bishop-Stortford, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford, 11½ miles (E. by N.) from Hertford; containing 2394 inhabitants. The EasternCounties railway crosses the river Stort near this place. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £17; patron, the Bishop of London; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. The great tithes have been commuted for £1479. 12., and the vicarial for £391; the appropriate glebe comprises 128 acres. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans.

Sawdon

SAWDON, a township, in the parish of Brompton, union of Scarborough, Pickering lythe, N. riding of York, 9 miles (W. S. W.) from Scarborough; containing 142 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1200 acres, and lies near the head of a small stream flowing southward to Wykeham: the village is north of the high road from Wykeham to Snainton. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Sawley (All Saints)

SAWLEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby; containing, with the chapelry of Long Eaton, and the hamlet of Wilsthorpe, 1933 inhabitants, of whom 1018 are in Sawley township, 2 miles (E.) from Shardlow. This place had anciently a market and a fair, of which the former, having fallen into disuse, was revived about 1760, but was again discontinued before 1770; the market-house still remains. The parish is situated on the rivers Trent and Derwent, and comprises about 4000 acres, in about equal portions of arable and grass land; the surface is generally flat, and the soil various, with some excellent barley land. The village is neatly built; many of the population are employed in frame-work knitting and lace-running. The Trent and Mersey navigation, and the Erewash canal pass through the parish. Harrington bridge, across the Trent, on the Nottingham and Ashby-de-la-Zouch road, was commenced in 1786, and completed in 1790; it consists of six stone arches, and, with the approaches, is about 300 feet in length. Here is a station of the Rugby and Derby railway; the southern terminus of the Erewash-Valley railway is situated here; and here commences a line to Nottingham and Lincoln. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of Wilne annexed, in the patronage of the Bishop of Lichfield; net income, £266, with a glebehouse. The tithes were commuted for land, under inclosure acts, in 1765 and 1787. The church is a large venerable edifice, consisting of a nave, chancel, aisles, and tower; an ancient carved oak screen separates the nave and chancel: in 1838 a gallery was built, and an organ added. At Long Eaton is a chapel of ease. There are places of worship for Baptists, Wesleyans, and Methodists of the New Connexion.

Sawley

SAWLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Ripon, wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 5 miles (S. W. by W.) from Ripon; containing 527 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 3190 acres, of which about one-third is arable. The soil is various, in the high lands light, and in the valleys a heavy loam; the surface is varied, in some parts attaining considerable elevation, and the scenery is generally pleasing. Here are quarries of good building-stone, from which was obtained part of the material for the erection of Trinity church, Ripon. The chapel is dedicated to St. Michael: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Ripon. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Sawley

SAWLEY, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Clitheroe, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. E.) from Clitheroe; containing, with Tosside, 479 inhabitants. The district comprises by computation 2250 acres of land. It belonged to a Cistercian abbey in honour of the Blessed Virgin, founded here in 1146, by William de Percy, and the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, was estimated at £221. 15. 8.; the site is now the property of Earl de Grey. There are some remains of the nave and transepts of the church, and the gate-house has been converted into a cottage.

Sawston (St. Mary)

SAWSTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Linton, hundred of Whittlesford, county of Cambridge, 5¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Linton; containing 992 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from London to Cambridge, and comprises 1817 acres. The ancient manor-house here of the Huddleston family was visited by Queen Mary, who spent some time in it. A paper-mill affords employment to 60 persons, and the manufacture of parchment to about 20. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 10. 2½.; net income, £118; patrons and impropriators, John Gosling and R. Huddleston, Esqrs. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1802. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Sawtry (All Saints)

SAWTRY (All Saints), a parish, in the hundred of Norman-Cross, union and county of Huntingdon, 3½ miles (S.) from Stilton; containing 628 inhabitants. It is situated on the road to York, and comprises 1334a. 1r. 34p.; the soil is a strong clay, producing excellent crops of wheat, and the meadows are rich. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 15. 7½.; net income, £189; patrons, the Duke of Devonshire, who has two turns, and M. M. Middleton, Esq., who has one. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1804. The church is in the early English style, with a tower and low spire, and has three stalls on the north side of the chancel.

Sawtry (St. Andrew)

SAWTRY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the hundred of Norman-Cross, union and county of Huntingdon, 3½ miles (S. by E.) from Stilton; containing 371 inhabitants, and consisting of 1026a. 35p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 0½.; net income, £169; patrons, the family of Annesley. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1804; the glebe altogether comprises 200 acres. The church is an ancient structure. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Sawtry (St. Judith)

SAWTRY (St. Judith), an extra-parochial liberty, and formerly a parish, in the hundred of NormanCross, union and county of Huntingdon, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Stilton; containing 264 inhabitants. A monastery for Cistercian monks was founded here in 1146, by Servin, Earl of Northampton, who placed in it brethren from the abbey of Wardon, in the county of Bedford; it was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and flourished till the Dissolution, when its revenue was returned at £141. 3. 8. The liberty comprises about 3000 acres, and is the property of the Hon. Charles Compton Cavendish; about 1000 acres are woodland, chiefly oak. The church has long been demolished.

Saxby (St. Peter)

SAXBY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 163 inhabitants. It comprises 1366a. 39p. The soil is fertile, the surface gently undulated, and the scenery pleasingly varied; the lower grounds are watered by a brook. The substratum is a fine gravel, at no great depth from the surface. The Melton and Oakham canal passes through the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, with the vicarage of Stapleford consolidated, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £168; patron, the Earl of Harborough: the glebe comprises 38 acres, with a house. The church was erected in 1789, by the grandfather of the present earl. Skeletons, urns, weapons, &c, have been discovered.

Saxby (St. Helen)

SAXBY (St. Helen), a parish, in the E. division of the wapentake of Aslacoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 4 miles (S. E.) from Spittal; containing 140 inhabitants. This place has long been in the possession of the Saundersons, now represented by the Earl of Scarborough. The parish is bordered on the west by the Roman road from Lincoln to the Humber, and by two inconsiderable streams which, uniting at the north-eastern extremity, form the river Ancholme. It comprises about 1400 acres. The substratum abounds with stone, which is quarried for inferior kinds of building, and for repairing the roads. The living is a vicarage, with the rectory of Firsby united, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 1.; net income, £46; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Scarborough: the glebe contains 14 acres. The church, a neat edifice in the Grecian style, is the place of interment for the family of the earl: some foundations have been discovered near it, supposed to be the remains of a Roman villa.

Saxby (All Saints)

SAXBY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, N. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. W.) from Barton-upon-Humber; containing 287 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2341a. 1r. 11p. The soil is light, resting on chalk, and there are several chalk-pits, from which a material is raised for mending the roads, and also for manure. The surface is elevated, and the scenery of pleasing character, being embellished with some thriving plantations. Saxby Hall is a neat mansion, and the village is agreeably situated on a declivity of the Wolds, overlooking the vale of the Ancholme. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 18. 6½., and in the gift of the family of Barton: the tithes have been commuted for £432. 17., and the glebe comprises 8 acres. The church has a tower on the south side of the nave, and contains over the altar a beautiful painting of Our Saviour restoring sight to Bartimeus, presented by the patrons.

Saxelby (St. Peter)

SAXELBY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 112 inhabitants. It comprises about 2600 acres. The soil is clay, alternated with sand and gravel; the surface is hilly, and the low grounds are watered by a brook. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £215, arising from 160 acres of land; patron, Earl of Aylesford. The church is ancient.

Saxelby (St. Botolph)

SAXELBY (St. Botolph), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Lincoln; containing, with the hamlets of North and South Ingleby, 1058 inhabitants. This parish comprises by admeasurement 4240 acres of land, having for the most part a strong clayey soil. It is situated on the road from Lincoln to Gainsborough, and intersected by the Foss dyke, which is navigable for sloops and barges. The village is large and well built; a statute-fair is held in it in May. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of the Bishop of Lincoln, with a net income of £167, and a glebehouse newly erected. The tithes were commuted for land in 1806; 245 acres were awarded to Lord Monson, the impropriator, 126 to the vicar, and 22 to the lord of the manor. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a good tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Saxham, Great (St. Andrew)

SAXHAM, GREAT (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 271 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 13. 11½., and in the gift of William Mills, Esq., who has a seat here: the tithes have been commuted for £369, and the glebe comprises 13 acres.

Saxham, Little (St. Nicholas)

SAXHAM, LITTLE (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 3¾ miles (W.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 230 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 11. 5½.; net income, £300; patron, the Marquess of Bristol. The tower of the church, which is round, is remarkable for the elegance of its design; this and the south door are the chief Norman features remaining.

Saxlingham (St. Margaret)

SAXLINGHAM (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Holt, W. division of Norfolk, 3¾ miles (W. by N.) from Holt; containing 147 inhabitants. It comprises about 1500 acres of land, chiefly arable, with 120 acres of pasture and woodland; the surface is varied, and the views from the higher grounds extend over the richly-wooded vale of the Glaven. The living is a rectory, with that of Sherrington annexed, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 3½.; net income, £589; patron, Sir R. P. Jodrell, Bart., who is lord of the manor. The glebe comprises 28 acres, with a handsome house, built by the Rev. S. Jodrell, the incumbent. The church is a cruciform structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains a large and costly monument in the form of an Egyptian pyramid, ornamented with numerous hieroglyphics, erected by Sir Christopher Heydon to the memory of his lady, who died in 1593.

Saxlingham-Nethergate (St. Mary)

SAXLINGHAM-NETHERGATE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (N. E.) from Stratton St. Mary; containing 650 inhabitants, of whom about 50 are employed in weaving. This parish, with Saxlingham-Thorpe, comprises 2111 acres, of which 107 are common or waste land, The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Saxlingham-Thorpe united, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 8.; net income, £699; patron, the Rev. J. H. Steward. The church contains monuments to the Very Rev. John Baron, Dean of Norwich, and the Ven. J. Gooch, Archdeacon of Sudbury, and his lady. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Saxlingham-Thorpe (St. Mary)

SAXLINGHAM-THORPE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 3¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Stratton St. Mary; containing 131 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Saxlingham-Nethergate, and valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4. The church has fallen into ruins.

Saxmundham (St. John the Baptist)

SAXMUNDHAM (St. John the Baptist), a market-town and parish, in the union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 20 miles (N. E. by N.) from Ipswich, and 89 (N. E.) from London; containing 1097 inhabitants. This town, which is supposed to be of Saxon origin, is situated in a valley, on the road from Yarmouth to London, and near a small stream which flows on the eastern side into the Ore. It consists chiefly of one street in a direction north and south, comprising modern and newly-fronted houses of neat and respectable appearance. There is an assemblyroom, in which balls and concerts are occasionally held. The inhabitants are plentifully supplied with water from springs. The only branch of business is the trade in malt: the market is on Thursday, and is noted for corn, which is shipped in large quantities from Snape and Iken wharfs, for London. Fairs take place on WhitTuesday, and the first Thursday in October, for toys, &c. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 15. 10., and in the gift of W. Long, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £275, and the glebe comprises 29 acres. The church is a little southward of the town, embosomed in trees; a gallery has been erected, and the building contains several monuments to the family of Long, who have their seat at Hurt's Hall, in the parish. There is a place of worship for Independents. A chantry was founded here by Robert Swan, about 1308.

Saxondale

SAXONDALE, a township, in the parish of Shelford, union, and S. division of the wapentake, of Bingham, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 8 miles (E.) from Nottingham; containing 121 inhabitants. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Saxtead (All Saints)

SAXTEAD (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoxne, E. division of Suffolk, 13 miles (N.) from Woodbridge; containing 447 inhabitants, and comprising by survey 1202 acres, of which 28 are common or waste. The living is annexed to the rectory of Framlingham: the tithes have been commuted for £340. The church is in the decorated English style; the steeple fell down in 1806, and has not been rebuilt.

Saxthorpe (St. Andrew)

SAXTHORPE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of South Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Reepham; containing 342 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2111 acres, of which 1889 are arable, 128 pasture, and 94 woodland; the surface is undulated, and the higher grounds command some fine views. The village is situated on the river Bure, and on the road from Norwich to Holt. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Pembroke Hall, Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for £290.10., and the vicarial for £87; the glebe comprises 43½ acres, and there are 19 acres of land at Wood-Dalling belonging to the living. The church is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles, with a square embattled tower. Here was anciently a chapel, founded by Aymer de Valence in 1313, and the site of which is still called Chapel Close.

Saxton (All Saints)

SAXTON (All Saints), a parish, in the Upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York; containing, with Towton township, 573 inhabitants, of whom 427 are in the township of Saxton with Scarthingwell, 4¼ miles (S. by W.) from Tadcaster. The parish comprises by computation 4030 acres, and is chiefly the property of the daughters and co-heiresses of R. O. Gascoigne, Esq.; the land is generally in good cultivation. Scarthingwell Hall was formerly the residence of Lord Hawke, who is a considerable landowner here; it is a neat mansion, pleasantly situated, with a park of 160 acres. The village is built on an acclivity. Here are some quarries of stone for building. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £76; patrons and impropriators, the family of Gascoigne. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, and contains several monuments of the Hungate and Hawke families. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Lords Dacre and Westmorland, with many others of the slain in the battle of Towton, were interred here.