Sheinton - Shelwick

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

66-69

Citation Show another format:

'Sheinton - Shelwick', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 66-69. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51268&strquery=sheldon Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Sheinton (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SHEINTON (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Atcham, hundred of Stottesden, though locally in the hundred of Condover, S. division of Salop, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Wenlock; containing 154 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Severn, which forms its western boundary; the soil is generally fertile, the surface undulated, and the prevailing scenery of pleasing character. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 9. 2.; net income, £288; patron, the Rev. H. Bagnall.

Shelding, county of York.—See Skelding.

SHELDING, county of York.—See Skelding.

Sheldon

SHELDON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 3 miles (W.) from Bakewell; containing 180 inhabitants. There are lead-mines in the neighbourhood. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £99; patron, the Vicar of Bakewell; impropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield and the Duke of Devonshire. The chapel is dedicated to All Saints. Mary Frost, in 1756, gave £200 for apprenticing boys.

Sheldon (St. James)

SHELDON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Honiton, hundred of Hayridge, Cullompton and N. divisions of Devon, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Cullompton; containing 190 inhabitants. It comprises 1570 acres, of which 292 are common or waste land. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Miles family, with a net income of £250: the tithes have been commuted for £140; there are two acres of glebe.

Sheldon (St. Giles)

SHELDON (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Meriden, Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 5½ miles (E. S. E.) from Birmingham, on the road to London; containing 487 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2497a. 2r. 28p., of which 1446 acres are arable, 475 pasture, and 576 meadow. The soil is various, partly marl, and partly of a gravelly quality; the chief produce is wheat, barley, beans, and turnips: oak is the prevailing kind of wood. The London and Birmingham railway passes through the parish, and the Birmingham and Warwick canal within about two miles. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 10. 10., and in the gift of Earl Digby: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe comprises 38 acres. The church is a small edifice, principally in the decorated English style, with a fine tower of later architecture, and a curious wood porch, parts of which have had good carvings, now nearly obliterated by time: in the north aisle is a beautiful piece of stone tabernaclework, consisting of three canopied niches. A school here has an endowment of about £35 per annum.

Sheldwick (St. James)

SHELDWICK (St. James), a parish, in the union and hundred of Faversham, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 2¾ miles (S. by W.) from Faversham; containing 547 inhabitants. It comprises 1896 acres, of which 236 are in wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 16. 8.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury. The great tithes have been commuted for £530, with two acres of glebe; and the vicarial for £200, with one acre. The church is principally in the decorated English style.

Shelf

SHELF, a township, in the chapelry of Coley, parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Halifax; containing 3050 inhabitants. This township is supposed to have derived its name from its situation under the eastern acclivities of North Owram. It comprises about 1350 acres: the soil is generally fertile; and the district abounds with coal, in three separate seams, called respectively the one-foot, the black, and the better bed. Iron-ore is found in abundance, and is wrought in a smelting-furnace and foundry belonging to the Low Moor Company. There are also extensive quarries of freestone of excellent quality. The village is on the new Bradford road; a few of its inhabitants are employed in agriculture, but the principal part in the manufacture of an article in great request, called fancy-figured Orleans, a texture consisting of mohair, worsted, and cotton. Here are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Shelfanger (All Saints)

SHELF ANGER (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Guiltcross, hundred of Diss, E. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Diss; containing 445 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1663 acres, of which 1134 are arable, and about 500 meadow and pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17; net income, £440; patron, the Duke of Norfolk. The church is an ancient structure in the decorated English style, with a square tower. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Shelford (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SHELFORD (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Bingham, S. division of the wapentake of Bingham and of the county of Nottingham, 8 miles (E. N. E.) from Nottingham; containing, with the township of Saxondale, and part of that of Newton, 808 inhabitants, of whom 547 are in Shelford township. The parish comprises by measurement 3598 acres, and forms a portion of the vale of the Trent; that river bounds it on the west and north, and the Fosse-road touches its south-eastern boundary. The manor-house was garrisoned by Colonel Stanhope, son of the first earl of Chesterfield, for Charles I., and was taken by storm by Colonel Hutchinson, for the parliament, after a gallant resistance, during which Colonel Stanhope and most of his men were slain. A few persons are employed in frame-work knitting. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £60; patron, the Earl of Chesterfield. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style; it is the burial-place of the noble family of Stanhope, and contains the remains of Philip, the accomplished Earl of Chesterfield, who died in 1773. A priory in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary (was established here in the time of Henry II., by Ralph Hanselyn, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £151. 14. 1. An hospital called the Bede Houses, was founded and endowed in 1694, by Sir William Stanhope, for the reception and support of six of his decayed tenants. Shelford gives the inferior title of Baron to the family.

Shelford, Great (St. Mary)

SHELFORD, GREAT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Thriplow, county of Cambridge, 4½ miles (S. by E.) from Cambridge; containing 803 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from London to Cambridge, and contains a station of the London and Cambridge railway. Here are some very extensive flour and oil-cake mills, driven by the stream of the Granta, and employing about 20 persons. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £102; patron, the Bishop of Ely; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Jesus College, Cambridge. The church is said to have been built by Bishop Fordham, who died in 1425; the steeple was blown down by a great storm in 1703, and again in 1798, but was rebuilt by subscription: in the chancel is a monument to Dr. Redman, Bishop of Norwich. There is a place of worship for Baptists. On a farm called Grannams, the property of St. John's College, are some remains of a Roman intrenchment. The late Rev. Robert Hall, the eminent dissenting minister, was for three years a resident in the parish.

Shelford, Little (All Saints)

SHELFORD, LITTLE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Thriplow, county of Cambridge, 5½ miles (S. by E.) from Cambridge; containing 527 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Granta, which divides it from Great Shelford, and on the road from London to Cambridge. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 9. 7.; net income, £370; patron and incumbent, the Rev. H. Finch. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under acts of inclosure, in 1798 and 1813. In the chancel of the church is a monument to Sir John de Treville, a Knight Templar, and lord of the manor, with his figure in a recumbent position: a skeleton encased in lead was dug up near the altar in 1824, the hair of it being in a perfect state. There is a place of worship for Independents. Near the bridge over the Granta was anciently a hermitage.

Shell, or Shelve

SHELL, or Shelve, an extra-parochial hamlet, in the union of Droitwich, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Droitwich and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3 miles (S. E.) from Droitwich; containing 57 inhabitants, and comprising 240 acres. This place is within the parliamentary borough of Droitwich, and shares in the election of the member.

Shelland

SHELLAND, a parish, in the union and hundred of Stow, W. division of Suffolk, 3½ miles (W. N. W.) from Stow-Market; containing 109 inhabitants. The living is a donative; net income, £40; patron and impropriator, C. Tyrrel, Esq., whose tithes have been commuted for £125. The church was appropriated to that of Haughley in the 3rd of Edward III.; the present building bears date 1767.

Shelley (St. Peter)

SHELLEY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 1½ mile (N.) from Ongar; containing 209 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by a small stream, on the banks of which are luxuriant meadows; and the beauty of the surrounding scenery renders it a desirable place of retirement. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 15., and in the gift of J. Tomlinson, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £180, and the glebe comprises 35 acres. The church is a neat edifice of brick, erected in 1811, on the foundation of a former structure. The parsonage, a handsome ancient mansion of timber frame-work and plaster, was for some time the retreat of Dr. Thomas Newton, Bishop of Bristol, and author of a Dissertation on the Prophecies. The Rev. H, Soames, historian of the Reformation, is rector of Shelley.

Shelley (All Saints)

SHELLEY (All Saints), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Samford, E. division of Suffolk, 2½ miles (S.) from Hadleigh; containing 139 inhabitants, and comprising 928a. 28p. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £72; patron, Mrs. J. M. Cripps. The tithes have been commuted for £62. The steeple of the church is on the north side of the nave, serving for a porch.

Shelley

SHELLEY, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Burton, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 6 miles (S. E.) from Huddersfield; containing 1772 inhabitants, and comprising rather more than 1400 acres. The village is situated on an acclivity, near the source of the river Dearne, and on the road to Penistone; the inhabitants are chiefly employed in the manufacture of woollen-cloths and fancy goods. There are places of worship for Methodists of the New Connexion and Independents; also a school built by subscription in 1806, and endowed with an allotment of common land now producing £12 per annum.

Shellingford.—See Shillingford.

SHELLINGFORD.—See Shillingford.

Shellow-Bowels (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SHELLOW-BOWELS (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Ongar, hundred of Dunmow, N. division of Essex, 6¼ miles (N. E.) from Ougar; containing 134 inhabitants. This parish, which is supposed to have been formerly much more extensive, comprises 456a. 8p., whereof 366 acres are arable, 80 pasture, and 9 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, consolidated with that of Willingdale-Doe, and valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 4.; the tithes have been commuted for £120, and the glebe comprises 13 acres. The church is a handsome edifice of brick, erected on the site of a former structure in 1752.

Shelsley-Beauchamp (All Saints)

SHELSLEY-BEAUCHAMP (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Martley, partly in the Lower, and partly in the Upper, division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, about 10 miles (N. W.) from Worcester; containing 519 inhabitants, of whom 275 are in the hamlet of Shelsley-Beauchamp. This parish is situated on the left bank of the river Teme, and comprises 2156 acres of fertile land, chiefly laid out in pasture; the arable lands produce wheat, hops, fruit, &c. The prospects are very beautiful, especially that from Upper House, the seat of Charles Edward Moore, Esq., embracing a perfect panorama of the country around, with the Malvern and the Shropshire hills. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 4½.; net income, £376; patron, Lord Ward. The church, a stone edifice of the 12th century, was thoroughly repaired, and a north aisle added, in 1846, at a cost of £800, of which Lord Ward contributed £500. A free school was endowed with £100, by the Rev. Owen Plwy, in 1681, and subsequently received benefactions in land from Caleb Avenant and others, yielding in the whole £60 per annum. The Rev. Thomas Webb, in 1703, bequeathed an estate called Hay-Oak farm, for apprenticing children. Fossil remains are found in the limestone strata.

Shelsley, King's

SHELSLEY, KING'S, a hamlet, in the parish of Shelsley-Beauchamp, union of Martley, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester; containing 244 inhabitants, and comprising 895 acres.

Shelsley-Walsh (St. Andrew)

SHELSLEY-WALSH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Martley, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, about 10 miles (N. W.) from Worcester; containing 49 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the right bank of the river Teme, and comprises 490 acres; the soil is very rich, and the scenery interspersed with hanging woods. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 8. 9.; net income, £90; patron, Lord Ward. The church was originally Norman, of which style there are remains: some of the old oak carving is particularly fine.

Shelswell (St. Ebbe)

SHELSWELL (St. Ebbe), a parish, in the union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Bicester; containing 43 inhabitants, and comprising 846a. 3r. 2p. The living is a rectory, annexed to Newton-Purcell, and valued in the king's books at £4: the tithes of Shelswell have been commuted for £186. The church is in ruins.

Shelton (St. Mary)

SHELTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Stodden, county of Bedford, 4 miles (W. by N.) from Kimbolton; containing 128 inhabitants. It comprises about 940 acres; the soil is principally clay, and the surface uniformly level. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13; net income, £190; patron, Lord St. John.

Shelton (St. Mary)

SHELTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Defwade, E. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Long Stratton; containing 215 persons. This place was anciently the property of the Sheltons, who were owners of the Hall, a castellated structure long since pulled down. From that family the estate passed to Sir Robert Houghton, one of the justices of the king's bench. The parish is a little to the east of the road from Norwich to Ipswich, and comprises 1301a. 2r. 6p., of which 1024 acres are arable, and 267 pasture. The living is a rectory, with that of Hardwick annexed, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of F. B. Frank, Esq.: the tithes of the two parishes have been commuted for £640, and there is a glebe of 43 acres, with a neat parsonage-house. The church, built by Sir Ralph Shelton about 1487, is an interesting edifice in the later English style, consisting of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a square embattled tower; the interior is of rich and handsome appearance.

Shelton (St. Mary)

SHELTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bingham, S. division of the wapentake of Newark and of the county of Nottingham, 6½ miles (S. by W.) from Newark; containing 102 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 14. 4½.; net income, £322; patron, the Rev. J. J. Maltby. The church, a small edifice, was partly rebuilt in 1831.

Shelton

SHELTON, a district parish, in the parish, union, and newly-erected borough of Stoke-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Newcastle-underLyme; containing, with the hamlet of Etruria, and part of the village of Cobridge, 11,955 inhabitants. Shelton has arisen, like other towns in the county, from the very extensive potteries carried on in the vicinity. It is amply supplied with water; the footpaths are paved with brick, and the town is lighted with gas under the superintendence of commissioners appointed for the townships of Shelton and Hanley. An act for the establishment of a market was procured in 1813, by the provisions of which the rents, tolls, and duties are vested in trustees; and the surplus is directed to be appropriated from time to time to the promotion of public works within the two townships. A mechanics' institute was founded in 1826, under the patronage of the Marquess of Stafford, Josiah Wedgwood, Esq., and others; and concerts, mostly for the benefit of some charity, take place occasionally. The principal articles of manufacture are porcelain and earthenware, affording employment to more than 3000 men, women, and children: several of the manufactories are situated on the banks of the Trent and Mersey and the Caldon canals. In the hamlet of Etruria are the extensive potteries and handsome mansion of the late Josiah Wedgwood, the latter remarkable for the beauty of its situation and style of architecture, and for the many splendid Etruscan vases with which it is ornamented. These specimens of art are imitations of original vases found in Italy, to the discovery of which that gentleman was chiefly indebted for the elegance of form and purity of taste that he introduced into the manufacture of porcelain, china, and stone ware. For this manufacture his works became deservedly celebrated; and by the use of flint in the composition of the articles, also introduced by Mr. Wedgwood, it was, under his auspices, progressively brought to perfection. The coal and ironstone mines in Shelton and part of the township of Hanley belong to the crown, and are worked by Earl Granville, the lessee.

Under the provisions of an act passed in 1827. Shelton has been recently separated from the rectory of Stoke, and made a distinct district rectory, endowed with £15,000 from the proceeds of tithes authorized to be sold. The Rev. Clotworthy Gillmor, M.A., was the first rector of this new living, of which his father, Capt Gillmor, R. N., had purchased the adowson for £9300. The total net income is about £750. The church, a handsome and spacious edifice in the early English style, with a square embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, was erected by Her Majesty's Commissioners, at an expense of £9311, towards defraying which George IV. gave £250 from the revenues of the duchy of Lancaster; it was consecrated on the 19th of June, 1834, and is dedicated to St. Mark. In the chancel is a beautiful painted window representing the Nativity and Ascension. The late Dr. Woodhouse gave £1000, with its accumulations, for the erection of a parsonage-house, and allotted funds for the support of a national school, which has also a permanent endowment from land given by Mrs. Hannah Bagnal: the house has been built at a cost of about £2300. A district named Etruria was formed in the parish in 1844, and endowed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; by whom, also, another district was formed in 1845, called Hope, having a population of about 3400. Each of the two livings is in the alternate gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Lichfield. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans of the Old and New Connexion. In Shelton, also, is the North Staffordshire Infirmary, a noble institution founded in 1816, and since very much enlarged; including the fever wards, which occupy one of the wings, it is capable of accommodating more than 100 patients. Elijah Fenton, the poet, was born here in 1683.—See Hanley and Etruria.

Shelve (All Saints)

SHELVE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Clun, hundred of Chirbury, S. division of Salop, 7¾ miles (N. by E.) from Bishop's-Castle; containing 69 inhabitants. The parish is situated on an eminence nearly 500 feet above the level of the sea, and contains numerous veins of lead-ore, which is considered to vie in richness with any in England: one of the mines was worked by the Romans in the time of Adrian, as is evident from an inscription on a pig of lead found in the vicinity. A market on Friday, and a fair on the festival of the Invention of the Cross, were granted to the inhabitants by Henry III. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 13. 4., and in the gift of Robert Bridgeman More, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £42, and the glebe comprises 18 acres. The church is a small ancient structure, with a square tower; it has been repewed.

Shelwick

SHELWICK, a township, in the parish of Holmer, hundred of Grimsworth, union and county of Hereford, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Hereford; containing 236 inhabitants.