Shipborne - Shipton-upon-Cherwell

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

82-85

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'Shipborne - Shipton-upon-Cherwell', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 82-85. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51272 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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Shipborne (St. Giles)

SHIPBORNE (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Malling, hundred of Wrotham, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 3¾ miles (N.) from Tonbridge; containing 451 inhabitants. It comprises 1917 acres, of which 130 are in wood. A fair is held on Sept. 1st, the festival of St. Giles the Abbot, to whom the church is dedicated. The living is a donative, in the patronage of John Simpson, Esq.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £91. Christopher Smart, the poet, was born here in 1722.

Shipbrook

SHIPBROOK, a township, in the parish of Davenham, union and hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 3 miles (S. E.) from Northwich; containing 89 inhabitants. It comprises 519 acres, of partly a sand and partly a clay soil. The Grand Trunk canal passes through the township. Tithe rentcharges have been awarded amounting to £58. 18., of which £53 are payable to the rector of the parish.

Shipden

SHIPDEN, formerly a parish, in the N. division of the hundred of Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk; adjacent to Cromer. The living was a rectory; but the church, dedicated to St. Peter, having been destroyed by an inundation of the sea, the parochial rights have been lost.

Shipdham (All Saints)

SHIPDHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Mitford, W. division of Norfolk, 17 miles (N. N. E.) from Thetford; containing 1861 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4561a. lr. 23p., of which 3405 acres are arable, and 1110 meadow and pasture. The village is situated on the road from East Dereham to Thetford, and is about a mile in length. The Bishop of Ely, who built a large Hall here, obtained a charter in the 29th of Henry III., for an annual fair and a market on Thursdays: the former was originally held on St. Peter's and St. Paul's day, and now takes place on the 29th June; the latter has been discontinued. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £27. 7. 6.; net income, £1120; patron and incumbent, the Rev. B. Barker. The church, which is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles, is a stately edifice with a lofty embattled tower crowned by a handsome turret; over the porch is a library bequeathed by the Rev. Thomas Townshend, a late rector, for the use of his successors. The Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists have places of worship. Thomas Bullock, in 1735, bequeathed some land which, with an allotment awarded at the inclosure, produces £60 per annum, for the support of a school. At the inclosure, also, about 126 acres were allotted to the poor, the proceeds of which amount to £150 per annum; and the rent of some houses and land, amounting to about £145 per annum, is applied to the repair of the church, and other parochial uses. Here was anciently a hermitage with a chapel dedicated to St. Thomas à Becket, for the repair of which the Bishop of Ely, in 1487, granted forty days' indulgence to all who should contribute.

Shipham (St. Leonard)

SHIPHAM (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, l½ mile (S.by E.) from Churchill; containing 707 inhabitants. It comprises 766a. 3r. 29p.; the substratum is rich in minerals, and lead and calamine works are in operation. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 13. 11., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Wells: the tithes have been commuted for £132. 17., and the glebe comprises 14 acres.

Shiplake (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SHIPLAKE (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Henley-upon-Thames, hundred of Binfield, county of Oxford, 2¾ miles (S.) from Henley; containing 565 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2693 acres, of which 256 are common or waste land. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 1.; net income, £147; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Windsor. The church is in the early English style, with a tower at the west end of the north aisle, covered with ivy; it contains monuments to the families of Blundell and Plowden, and in the south aisle is a memorial of the Rev. James Granger, author of the Biographical History of England, vicar of the parish. The eccentric antiquary and virtuoso, Henry Constantine Jennings, was born here, at the seat of his family, in 1731. He travelled early on the continent, where he collected, while in Italy, a number of statues and other antiques, with which he decorated his mansion at Shiplake. On his estate in Essex, he devoted himself to the accumulation of scarce books, pictures, and curiosities; and in later life he formed a museum at Chelsea, near London. All these were sold during periods of embarrassment; and after a life of chequered fortune and extravagance, he died in the king's bench prison, in 1819.

Shiplet, or Shipslade

SHIPLET, or Shipslade, a hamlet, in the parish of Bleadon, union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of the county of Somerset; containing 71 inhabitants.

Shipley

SHIPLEY, a township, in the parish of Heanor, union of Basford, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 9½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Derby; containing 671 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres, of a strong cold soil, and abounding in coal. Shipley Hall, the seat of Edward M. Mundy, Esq., is an elegant and substantial stone mansion of modern erection, standing on rising ground, in the centre of one of the finest estates in this part of the county, abounding in game, enriched with minerals, and adorned with beautiful scenery. The Nutbrook canal and several tramways communicate with the coalmines here.—See Cotmanhay.

Shipley

SHIPLEY, a township, in the parish of Eglingham, union of Alnwick, N. division of Coquetdale ward and of Northumberland, 4½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Alnwick; containing 124 inhabitants. The township includes the southern parts of the parish, and the road between Eglingham and Alnwick passes through it.

Shipley (St. Mary)

SHIPLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Horsham, hundred of West Grinstead, rape of Bramber, W. division of Sussex, 6 miles (S. S. W.) from Horsham; containing 1187 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 5656 acres, of which 3915 are arable, 648 pasture and meadow, and 195 woodland; the soil is generally clay, producing excellent wheat, and highly favourable to the growth of oak-trees. The ancient castle of Knap, here, which appears to have been founded in an early period of the Norman era, was visited by King John in 1206 and 1215, and was garrisoned during the parliamentary war. Part of the keep, with a fine Norman arch, is still remaining in the grounds of Sir Charles M. Burrell, Bart., who has erected a magnificent castellated residence within half a mile of the ruin; the mansion contains many stately apartments, and the grounds are enriched with much beautiful scenery, enlivened with a lake of 100 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £98; patron and impropriator, the Rev. L. Vernon Harcourt. The church is principally in the Norman style, and was repaired and enlarged in 1831; in the chancel is a monument of variegated marble to Sir Thomas Caryll, his lady, and family. A national school has been established, which has an endowment of £40 per annum, assigned by Mrs. Sarah Andrews in 1825; two other schools are partly supported by subscription, and the union workhouse for children is in the parish.

Shipley, with Heaton

SHIPLEY, with Heaton, a district parish, in the parish and union of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Bradford; containing 4043 inhabitants. The townships of Shipley and Heaton were formed into an ecclesiastical district by the Church Commissioners, in 1828, and, on the death of the Rev. H. Heap, vicar of Bradford, became a separate district parish under the 58th of George III., cap. 45. The parish is situated at the junction of the valleys of Bradford and Airedale, and comprises about 2030 acres, of which 516 are arable, 1217 pasture, and 297 wood and plantations. The surface is finely varied: the scenery in the less elevated grounds, opening into the richly-wooded and romantic valley of Lower Airedale, is beautiful; and the higher lands command extensive prospects. On the north side of the eminence on which the church is built is a magnificent view of Airedale, embracing Hawkesworth and Guiseley on the east, Harden and Bingley on the west, and extending over the vale to Hope Hill and Baildon Moor on the north. The soil is fertile: the substrata are principally coal, of which three mines are in operation, and freestone, of which there are several quarries; limestone is also found.

The village extends for nearly a mile along the south bank of the river Aire; at the western extremity are several well-built houses, commanding a prospect over Airedale, and at the eastern are numerous neat houses of various dimensions. The township comprises also the hamlets of Moorhead and Shipley-Fields. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the worsted and woollen manufactures, for the former of which there are five, and for the latter, three, mills; the manufacture of paper for pressing is carried on, and there is a whiting manufactory. An act for lighting the village with gas was passed in 1847. The Leeds and Liverpool canal intersects the parish, and is met here by the Bradford Branch canal. The Leeds and Bradford railway also runs through Shipley; and here commences the Leeds and Bradford Extension, which passes through the village by a deep excavation, and thence proceeds up the valley of the Aire to Bingley, Keighley, Skipton, and Colne. A fair, chiefly for cattle, is held on the first Monday after the 20th of October. The living is in the patronage of the Vicar of Bradford; income, £100. The church, dedicated to St. Paul, was erected by the Parliamentary Commissioners, at an expense of £7688, on a site given by the late John Wilmer Field, Esq., lord of the manor; the foundation stone was laid by the vicar of Bradford, on the 5th of November, 1823, and the building was consecrated by the Archbishop of York on the 5th of November, 1826. It is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a tower of four stories, embattled, and crowned with pinnacles; and contains 1488 sittings, of which 332 are free. There are places of worship for Baptists, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans. On the western slope of Baildon Moor is a remarkably strong chalybeate spring, containing no particle of saline matter, and producing ochre of beautiful colour, fit for paint; the water is thought to be superior to that of Harrogate. A chalybeate spring in a field called the Harrisons, near the Hirst, has lately been lost by the sinking of a coal-pit in its vicinity.

Shipmeadow (St. Bartholomew)

SHIPMEADOW (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Bungay; containing 265 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Waveney, and comprises 800 acres: the village is on the road from Beccles to Bungay. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of the Rev. A. Suckling: the tithes have been commuted for £220, and the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style of architecture, with a square embattled tower.

Shippon

SHIPPON, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Helen, Abingdon, union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormek, county of Berks, 1 mile (W. N. W.) from Abingdon; containing 198 inhabitants, and comprising 370a. 3r. 17p.

Shipston-upon-Stour (St. Edmund)

SHIPSTON-upon-Stour (St. Edmund), a markettown and parish, and the head of a union, in the Upper division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Blockley and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, locally in the Kington division of the hundred of Kington, county of Warwick, 16 miles (S. by W.) from Warwick, and 83 (N. W. by W.) from London; containing 1846 inhabitants. This place was formerly a township in the parish of Tredington, from which it was separated by an act of the 6th of George I. It is said to derive its name from having had one of the largest markets for sheep in the kingdom. The town is situated on the river Stour, in a fertile and rather hilly country, about two miles from the Stratford and Moreton railroad, to which a branch was opened in 1836. A library and reading-room were founded in 1837. The manufacture of shag was at one time largely carried on, but the place has now little trade of any description. The Dean and Chapter of Worcester, who possess the manorial rights, hold a court annually, at which a constable is appointed. The powers of the county debt-court of Shipston, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Shipston. The market is on Saturday; and there are fairs on the third Tuesday in April, June 22nd, the last Tuesday in August, and the Tuesday after October 10th. The parish comprises 1159a. 36p. of land. The living is a rectory, with that of Tidmington annexed, valued in the king's books at £33. 5.10.; net income, £700; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester, and Jesus College, Oxford, the former presenting to every third vacancy. The church is an ancient edifice with a tower, and contains several monuments: a gallery was erected in 1790. The Baptists, Society of Friends, and Wesleyans have each a place of worship; and at Foxcote, in the parish, is a Roman Catholic chapel. A national school is endowed with about £130 per annum; and various small bequests are distributed among the poor. The union of Shipston includes 37 parishes or places, 20 of which are in the county of Warwick, 13 in that of Gloucester, and 4 in that of Worcester; and contains a population of 19,685.

Shipton

SHIPTON, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Winslow, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham; containing 101 inhabitants.

Shipton (St. James)

SHIPTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Church-Stretton, liberties of the borough of Wenlock, S. division of Salop, 7 miles (S. W. by S.) from Wenlock; containing 153 inhabitants. This was formerly a chapelry in the parish of Wenlock. The living is a donative curacy; net income, £3; patron, Thomas Mytton, Esq., who, with others, is impropriator. The church has a low tower, and contains a fine Norman arch, with monuments to the Myttons.

Shipton

SHIPTON, a chapelry, in the parish of MarketWeighton, union of Pocklington, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, l¼ mile (N. W. by W.) from Market-Weighton; containing 322 inhabitants. This township, which has a pleasant village, comprises by computation 1570 acres of land. The chapel is a handsome structure consisting of a nave, chancel, aisles, and embattled tower. The tithes were commuted for land in 1773. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.

Shipton

SHIPTON, a township, in the parish of Overton, wapentake of Bolmer, N. riding of York, 5½ miles (N. W. by N.) from York; containing 418 inhabitants. The township comprises about 2130 acres of land, chiefly the property of Viscount Downe, who holds a court leet and baron here for the manors of Overton, Shipton, and Benningbrough. The village is pleasant, on the road between York and Easingwould; and a station on the York and Newcastle railway is fixed here. The tithes were commuted for land in 1812. There are places of worship for Calvinistic and Wesleyan Methodists; also a free grammar school, founded in 1655 by Ann Middleton, who endowed it with £40 per annum.

Shipton-Bellinger (St. Mary)

SHIPTON-BELLINGER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Andover, hundred of Thorngate, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 9 miles (W.) from Andover; containing 278inhabitants. It comprises about 2400 acres of land, chiefly arable. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; patrons and impropriators, T. A. Smith and George Pothecary, Esqrs. The great tithes have been commuted for £118, the vicarial tithes for £167, and there is a glebe of 3 acres.

Shipton-George

SHIPTON-GEORGE, a parochial chapelry, in the union of Bridport, hundred of Godderthorne, Bridport division of the county of Dorset, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Bridport; containing 406 inhabitants. The living is a curacy, attached to the rectory of Burton-Bradstock. The chapel, dedicated to St. Martin, and situated on high ground, is a small edifice with a low embattled tower. Near it, on the south-west, are slight remains of the ancient manor-house.

Shipton-Lee

SHIPTON-LEE, a hamlet, in the parish of Quainton, poor-law union of Aylesbury, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 5½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Winslow; containing 115 inhabitants. Here was formerly a chapel.

Shipton-Moyne (St. John the Baptist)

SHIPTON-MOYNE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Tetbury, hundred of Longtree, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2¼ miles (S. by E.) from Tetbury; containing 353 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 1. 10½., and in the gift of T. G. B. Est court, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £345, and the glebe comprises 173 acres. Here is a national school.

Shipton-Olliffe (St. Oswald)

SHIPTON-OLLIFFE (St. Oswald), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Northleach; containing 222 inhabitants. The parish, with that of Shipton-Sollers, comprises about 3000 acres; the surface is very hilly, and the soil thin, resting on limestone rock, but under good management producing favourable crops. The parishes adjoin each other, and none of the inhabitants can precisely ascertain the boundary; they are both situated to the north of the road to London. The living is a discharged rectory, with the living of Shipton-Sollers, valued in the king's books at £7. 5. 9.; net income, £412; patrons, alternately, W. G. Peachey, Esq., lord of the manor of Sollers, and W. P. Chapeau, Esq., lord of that of Olliffe. The tithes were commuted for 453 acres of land in 1792. The church has undergone a thorough repair.

Shipton-Sollers (St. Mary)

SHIPTON-SOLLERS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Northleach; containing 126 inhabitants, and comprising 1160 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Shipton-Olliffe in 1776, and valued in the king's books at £7. 3. 4.

Shipton-Under-Wychwood (St. Mary)

SHIPTON-UNDER-WYCHWOOD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Burford; containing, with the chapelries of Langley, Leafield, Lyneham, and Ramsden, and the township of Milton, 2624 inhabitants, of whom 546 are in Shipton township. From its proximity to Wychwood forest, Langley was anciently the residence of the royal family, while taking the diversion of the chase. The township of Shipton comprises 2342 acres, of which 500 are common or waste land. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16; net income, £335; patron and impropriator, the Professor of Civil Law in the University of Oxford. The great tithes of Shipton township have been commuted for £370, and the small for £110: the impropriator has a glebe of 76 acres, and the vicar of 5 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with some Norman portions, and a lofty tower surmounted by a spire; the south porch is enriched with niches containing mutilated statues, and there is a fine Norman doorway with zigzag mouldings. The pulpit is of stone, exquisitely sculptured; and the font, which is octagonal, is ornamented with the arms of the Warwick family and with tracery: at the west end of the nave is a painting of the Resurrection, and in the north aisle an altar-tomb with the recumbent effigy of a female, rudely sculptured. At Langley is a separate incumbency. There are remains of three religious houses, which have not been noticed by any writer; and another ancient building has long been converted into the Crown inn. Three singular stone vessels were found in digging the quarries at Milton.

Shipton-Upon-Cherwell (St. Mary)

SHIPTON-UPON-CHERWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Woodstock, hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford, 2¼ miles (E.) from Woodstock; containing 123 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the east by the river Cherwell, and intersected by the Oxford canal. It comprises by measurement 1062 acres, of which 305 are pasture, and the remainder arable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11.9. 4½.; net income, £310; patron, William Turner, Esq., of Shipton House. The tithes were commuted for land in 1768. The church was rebuilt in 1832, at the cost of Mr. Turner, and is in the later English style.