Stain - Stainton, Market

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

170-175

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'Stain - Stainton, Market', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 170-175. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51294 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Stain

STAIN, a hamlet, in the parish of Withern, poorlaw union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 14 inhabitants.

Stainbrough

STAINBROUGH, a township, in the parish of Silkstone, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (S. W.) from Barnsley; containing 482 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1700 acres of land, chiefly the property of Thomas Frederick Vernon Wentworth, Esq., lord of the manor. Wentworth Castle, situated here, now the seat of Mr. Wentworth, was erected in 1730, by Thomas Wentworth, third Earl of Strafford, on the death of whose son, in 1791, the earldom passed to the latter's cousin; in 1799 the title became extinct, and the estates descended to the Vernon family, who assumed the name of Wentworth. The castle is a magnificent structure, chiefly in the Grecian style, and contains a gallery 180 feet in length and 24 wide, divided into three compartments by a double range of marble pillars with gilt capitals. In the area of the quadrangle is a marble statue of Thomas, third Earl of Strafford, by Rysbrach; and near the south lodge is a fine stone column surmounted by a female figure, dedicated in 1744 to John, Duke of Argyle and Greenwich, who had died the preceding year. The park is well stocked with deer, and richly wooded; on the east side of the grounds is a serpentine canal, over which is a handsome stone bridge. There is a large colliery in the township. A neat chapel was erected in 1841, at the expense of Mr. Wentworth, who presents to the living as a donative.

Stainburn

STAINBURN, a township, in the parish of Workington, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 1 mile (E.) from Workington; containing 179 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land in 1812. Here was an oratory, subordinate to the priory of St. Bees.

Stainburn

STAINBURN, a chapelry, in the parish of KirkbyOverblows, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 4¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Otley; containing 248 inhabitants. It comprises 2900 acres of land in good cultivation, the property of F. H. Fawkes, Esq., lord of the manor. The village consists chiefly of scattered houses; the township also includes the small hamlets of Braythorne and Moorside. The chapel is a neat edifice in the Norman style, with narrow windows: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £58; patron, the Rector of Kirkby-Overblows. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1776. There are some trifling bequests for the poor.

Stainby (St. Peter)

STAINBY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Beltisloe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 2 miles (W.) from Colsterworth; containing 190 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the east by the river Witham, comprises 1390 acres. The soil is various, but well adapted for grain, and the substratum is partly red-stone rock, and partly freestone, which latter, though now little used, is said to have supplied the materials for building many of the beautiful churches in the fenny district. The living is a rectory, with that of Gunby consolidated in 1773, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 8.; net income, £466; patron, the Earl of Harborough. The tithes of the parish were commuted for 256 acres of land in 1773. The church was neatly rebuilt in 1805, at the expense of the late earl. Near the river are the remains of a Roman villa, where a sudatory, tessellated pavements of ordinary character,, and pieces of leaden pipes and tiles, have been found; and near the village is an ancient fortification with outworks, called Tower Hill. In the western part of the parish are two tumuli, not far distant from each other, supposed to be the graves of some slaughtered Danes.

Staindrop (St. Mary)

STAINDROP (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Teesdale, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham; comprising the townships of Hilton, Ingleton, Langleydale with Shotton, Raby with Keverstone, Staindrop, and Wackerfield; and containing 2436 inhabitants, of whom 1399 are in Staindrop township, 11 miles (W.N.W.) from Darlington, and 244 (N. N. W.) from London. This place, formerly called also Stainthorp, or "the stony town," was granted by King Canute, who had a mansion at Raby, to the monastery at Durham. It is pleasantly situated on the road from Barnard-Castle to BishopAuckland, in a valley, and consists chiefly of one long well-built street. In the vicinity are very extensive works for smelting lead-ore. A market on Saturday, and fairs on the Vigil of St. Thomas the Martyr and two following days were granted to the inhabitants in 1378, by Bishop Hatfield, but after a time, fell into disuse; the market, however, has been revived, and is well supplied with provisions. The magistrates hold petty-sessions every alternate Saturday. The parish comprises about 14,000 acres. The living is a vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Cockfield; impropriator, the Duke of Cleveland, whose tithes in the township of Staindrop have been commuted for £302. The church, formerly collegiate, is a handsome structure exhibiting portions in the early, decorated, and later English styles, with a square embattled tower rising from the centre, and contains some ancient monuments to the Neville family. There are places of worship for the Society of Friends, Independents, and Wesleyans; and schools supported by subscription. The collegiate establishment was founded in the reign of Henry IV., by Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmoreland, in honour of the Virgin Mary, for a master, six priests, six clerks, six decayed gentlemen, six poor officers, and other men; its revenue, at the Dissolution, was £170. 4. 6.

Staines (St. Mary)

STAINES (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Spelthorne, county of Middlesex, 10 miles (W. S. W.) from Brentford, and 17 (W. S. W.) from London; containing 2487 inhabitants. This place has by some been thought to derive its name from a Roman milliarium, said to have been fixed here; and the traces of a Roman road pointing towards Staines bridge, mentioned by Dr. Stukeley, who also describes the town as having been surrounded by a ditch, may strengthen this conjecture. But the more general opinion is, that its appellation is derived from a stone which, standing on the bank of the Thames near it, marks the extent of the jurisdiction of the lord mayor of London, as conservator of the river; the stone bears date 1285, and was raised upon a pedestal, erected on the spot where it originally stood, in 1781. In 1009, an army of Danes, after having burned the city of Oxford, learning that troops were on the march from London in pursuit of them, retreated to their ships, and crossed the river at this place. Duncroft House, in which King John is said to have slept the night after he had signed Magna Charta on the neighbouring plain of Runymede, is in the parish. A forest anciently extended from Staines to Hounslow, but part of it has been inclosed.

The town, which has been much improved of late, consists principally of one wide street, containing several good houses, terminating at the river. Here was formerly an iron bridge of one arch; but this being considered unsafe, a handsome stone bridge was opened in 1832, and a new street in a line with it. The town is lighted with gas from works situated on the opposite bank of the river, on the road to Egham. A building was erected near the bridge in 1835, for a literary and scientific institution. The market is on Friday; the market-house is a small edifice surmounted by a spire. There are fairs on May 11th and September 19th. The parish comprises 1822a. 2r. 21p., of which about 700 acres are arable, 600 meadow and pasture, and 454 common or waste. The living is a vicarage, with the livings of Laleham and Ashford annexed, valued in the king's books at £12. 3. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £425; impropriators, the family of Coussmaker. Attached to the vicarage are 59 acres of glebe in this parish, 16 in Laleham, and 26 in Ashford. The church is a neat structure, consisting of a nave, chancel, and north and south aisles, rebuilt in 1828, and a square embattled tower of brick, erected by Inigo Jones in 1631, and in 1829 raised twelve feet and surmounted with a battlement of stone crowned by pinnacles. There are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, and Independents. The poor-law union of Staines comprises thirteen parishes or places.

Stainfield

STAINFIELD, a parish, in the W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Wragby; containing 154 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2097 acres, of which 275 are wood, and the remainder arable and pasture: the soil is tolerably fertile, the surface flat, and a portion fenny land. There are some remains of an ancient mansion of the Tyrwhitt family, now occupied as a farmhouse. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £71; patron and impropriator, T. T. Drake, Esq. A priory of Benedictine nuns was founded here in the reign of Henry II., by Henry Percy, and at the Dissolution possessed a revenue of £112. 5.

Stainforth

STAINFORTH, a township, in the parish of Giggleswick, union of Settle, wapentake of Staincliffe West, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N.)' from Settle; containing 261 inhabitants. A considerable part of the land here belonged to Sawley Abbey, and at the Dissolution was granted to Sir Arthur D'Arcy. The township, including the hamlet of Little Stainforth, comprises about 3480 acres, laid out in pasture, and divided among various proprietors, subject to small quit-rents payable to Pudsey Dawson, Esq., of Hornby Castle. It is beautifully situated in the fertile valley of Ribblesdale, which abounds with romantic scenery; and between Great and Little Stainforth is a fine waterfall, formed by the Ribble in its passage over the limestone rock, a short distance above which an ancient bridge spans the river with one lofty arch, adding greatly to the effect. About a mile above the village of Great Stainforth, on a brook which flows into the Ribble, is another fall of water, of very considerable elevation, embosomed in magnificent scenery, and called Catrig force; immediately from the foot of which, the water again rushes down the precipitous rock, in several successive falls of varying height and character, the banks on either side being overhung with bold and broken rocks, interspersed with wood. There are some good houses in the village. A district church was erected in 1841, by Mr. Dawson, at an expense of £2500, on a site purchased by subscription; it is in the Tudor style, with a square embattled tower, and contains 250 sittings, all free. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed by subscription with £2100, and in the patronage of five Trustees.

Stainforth

STAINFORTH, a township, in the parish of Hatfield, union of Thorne, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Thorne; containing 924 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 2355 acres. The village is pleasantly situated on the river Don, near its communication with the Stainforth and Keadby canal; there are good bridges over the river and the canal, and a spacious quay for loading and unloading the sloops that trade here, several of which belong to the inhabitants. The chapel of ease at Stainforth, erected in the 14th century, was rebuilt in 1819, at an expense of £700, raised by subscription. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists, Wesleyans, and Unitarians. Henry Travers, in 1706, bequeathed land now producing about £15 per annum, for teaching children.

Staininghall.—See Stanninghall.

STAININGHALL.—See Stanninghall.

Stainington

STAININGTON, an ecclesiastical district in the parish of Ecclesfield, union of Wortley, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Sheffield, on the road to Glossop; containing upwards of 2000 persons. It comprises 5652 acres, and is chiefly a mountainous moorland district, on the north side of the river Rivelin, abounding, especially in the south and west portions, with game, which is strictly preserved. The neighbourhood contains coal of moderate quality, of which several mines are in operation; and there are some quarries of good freestone for building. The village consists chiefly of scattered houses; the population is partly employed in the manufacture of clasp-knives and anvils, and in grinding cutlery. A fair for cattle is held on the first Monday in November. The church, erected in 1830, at an expense of £3500, by parliamentary grant, is a neat structure in the later English style, with a campanile turret, and contains 799 sittings, of which 348 are free: it is dedicated to Christ; and the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Ecclesfield, with a net income of £150, and a glebe-house erected in 1840. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Unitarians; and a national and infants' school supported by subscription.

Stainland

STAINLAND, a township, in the parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. by W.) from Halifax; containing 3759 inhabitants. It comprehends the two manors of Stainland and Old Liudley, the former the property of the Earl of Scarborough, and the latter belonging to the family of Thornhill; and comprises by computation an area of 2335 acres, a considerable part of which was inclosed under an act of parliament, in 1807. The district abounds in variety of surface and scenery. The population is partly employed in the woollen, cotton, and worsted manufactures; and there are two mills for making pasteboard used in the woollen manufacture. Coal abounds in the township and its vicinity, and three mines are at present in operation; also some extensive quarries of freestone. Bradley Hall, here, the seat of the ancestors of the Earl of Mexborough, which was burnt down in 1629, and subsequently rebuilt, is now a farmhouse. The village is situated on an eminence above the vale of the Dean Head rivulet, commanding a pleasing view; in the neighbourhood are several handsome mansions, and the Elland station on the Manchester and Leeds railway is distant only about two miles and a half. The chapel, dedicated to St. Andrew, originally erected in 1755, was rebuilt in 1840 as a district church, at an expense of £1800, of which £300 were granted by the Ripon Diocesan Society, and the remainder raised by subscription; it is in the Grecian style, with a tower. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Halifax, with a net income of £150. The vicarial tithes were commuted for land in 1816. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; and a school in connexion with the Church is supported by subscription. Roman tiles have been found at Slack, in the township; opposite to the chapel is an ancient cross; and the township contains a fine spring of water called St. Helen's Holy well, impregnated slightly with iron, and containing sulphuretted hydrogen and a free alkali.

Stainley, North

STAINLEY, NORTH, with Sleningford, a township, in the parish and liberty of Ripon, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Ripon; containing 441 inhabitants. It is situated on the south bank of the river Ure, and comprises by computation 4230 acres; the soil is fertile, the surface finely undulated, and the scenery picturesque. The name of Sleningford is derived from an ancient ford over the Ure. Bramley Grange farm, here, was not long since purchased as the site of an episcopal palace for the Bishop of Ripon. Near it is a chapel, built by the late Archbishop of York, and presented to the see of Ripon for the use of the bishop's family and the convenience of the adjacent hamlet: the first stone of this edifice was laid in June 1846. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £302. 0. 6.; and the appropriate for £37. 12. 6., payable to the Dean and Chapter of Ripon. A neat church has been erected by subscription; the living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Dean and Chapter, with a net income of £100.

Stainley, South

STAINLEY, SOUTH, a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 2¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Ripley; containing 251 inhabitants. This place was the property of Sir Solomon Swale, who suffered severely for his loyalty during the parliamentary war, and was presented with the first baronetcy conferred after the Restoration. Sir Solomon, in those unsettled times, having neglected to sue out a renewal of the lease by which he held some property under the crown, a chancery clerk, noticing the omission, obtained it for himself, and involved the baronet in a litigation which, in a few years, ended in his becoming a prisoner in the king's bench, where he died of a broken heart. Stainley Hall, the ancient family seat, is now a ruin. The parish is within the liberty of Knaresborough, and comprises by measurement 2012a. 3r. 1p., whereof 1199 acres are arable, 750 meadow and pasture, and 61 woodland and plantations. The surface is undulated, and the scenery, which is enriched with wood, is in many parts beautifully picturesque; the soil is fertile, and the substratum abounds with limestone, which is extensively quarried, and burnt into lime. The village is situated on the road from Leeds to Ripon, and the parish includes also the hamlet of Cayton. The living is a vicarage; net income, £75; patron, R. Reynard, Esq. The church has been rebuilt in the early English style, at a cost of £700, defrayed by the vicar, landowners, and other inhabitants.

Stainmore

STAINMORE, a chapelry, in the parish of Brough, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Brough; containing 611 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £119; patron, the Earl of Thanet. The chapel was erected as a school in 1594, consecrated for divine service in 1680, and repaired in 1699 by Thomas, Earl of Thanet, who built a house adjoining, in which about 30 children are instructed for an endowment of £30 per annum. At a place called Maiden Castle is a Roman fort, and there is another at Rere Cross, which, according to tradition, was erected in the first or second century, by Marius, a petty king of the Britons, in memory of a victory over the Picts.

Stainsby

STAINSBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Ault-Hucknall, union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 5¾ miles (S. E.) from Chesterfield; containing 101 inhabitants.

Stainsby

STAINSBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Ashby-Puerorum, union of Horncastle, hundred of Hill, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; with 24 inhabitants.

Stainsiker, or Stainsacre.—See Hawsker.

STAINSIKER, or Stainsacre.—See Hawsker.

Stainton

STAINTON, a township, in the parish of Stanwix, union of Carlisle, Cumberland ward, and E. division of the county of Cumberland, 1½ mile (N. W.) from Carlisle; containing 69 inhabitants.

Stainton

STAINTON, a township, in the parish of Dacre, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 2¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from the town of Penrith; containing 305 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1772.

Stainton, with Streatlam

STAINTON, with Streatlam, a township, in the parish of Gainford, union of Teesdale, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 1¾ mile (N. E. by N.) from Barnard Castle; containing 373 inhabitants, of whom 112 are in the hamlet of Stainton. This hamlet at an early period belonged to the Traynes, lords of Streatlam; and was acquired, by marriage with the heiress of Trayne, by Sir Adam Bowes. The estate afterwards became separated from the Streatlam property, but was re-united to it in 1526, when the Hedlam family assigned the lands to Sir William Bowes. About a century subsequently, a portion of Stainton was again detached, and so continued until the commencement of the present century, when the late Earl of Strathmore once more annexed Stainton to Streatlam. The village is small, and scattered on a high exposed site; the houses standing on the brink of large quarries of freestone, from which the materials for most of the buildings in the neighbourhood have been obtained. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £100, and the impropriate for £204. 13. 6.—See Streatlam.

Stainton

STAINTON, a township, in the parish of Urswick, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 1½ mile (S. E.) from Dalton; containing 80 inhabitants. This place is noted for its iron-mines.

Stainton, or Crosscrake

STAINTON, or Crosscrake, a chapelry, in the parish of Heversham, union and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Kendal; containing 605 inhabitants, of whom 365 are in the township of Stainton. The chapelry, including the township of Sedgwick, comprises about 2004 acres, of which 1910 are arable, 40 meadow, and 54 woodland. The Lancaster canal and the Lancaster and Carlisle railway pass through. In Stainton township are the hamlets of Stainton-row, Barrows-Green, Crosscrake, Helm, and Halfpenny. On a stream tributary to the Belo, are two mills for spinning flax, and a woollen-mill; and the manufacture of bobbin is also carried on. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £87; patron, the Vicar of Heversham. The chapel, called Crosscrake chapel, was founded in the reign of Richard II., by Anselm de Furness, son of the first Michael le Fleming; was rebuilt in 1773; and had a burial-ground attached to it in 1823. There is a place of worship for Independents. At Helme are the remains of an encampment.

Stainton

STAINTON, a township, in the parish of Downholme, union of Richmond, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 5½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Richmond; containing 47 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1840 acres of land, half of which is uninclosed: the village is situated among the fells, about a mile southward of the river Swale.

Stainton (St. Peter)

STAINTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Stockton, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Hemlington, Ingleby-Berwick, and Malby, the chapelry of Thornaby, and the village of South Stockton, 2256 inhabitants, of whom 391 are in the township of Stainton, 5½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Stockton. The parish is in the district of Cleveland, and occupies an elevated site, commanding a view of the sea, and the mouth of the river Tees; the soil is a loam resting upon clay, and there is a quarry of whinstone affording excellent materials for the roads. The township of Stainton, the most considerable division in the parish, comprises the manors of Stainton, Thornton, and Stainsby, respectively styled in Domesday book Steintun, Tornetun, and Stemanesbie: the chief owners of property in it, at various periods, appear to have been the families of De Brus, Thweng, Gower, and Pennyman. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 14. 2.; net income, £270; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York. The church, an ancient structure situated on an eminence, was thoroughly repaired in 1810. Attached to the vicarage is a library of 344 volumes on divinity, bequeathed by the Rev. Richard Lumley, vicar from 1667 to 1676. At Thornaby is a separate incumbency. There is a place of worship for Independents; and a parochial school, to which Mrs. Bourdon in 1817 left £5. 5. per annum, is further supported by subscription.

Stainton (St. Winifred)

STAINTON (St. Winifred), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 2 miles (W.) from Tickhill; containing 226 inhabitants. This parish, including the hamlet of Hellaby, comprises by computation 3050 acres; the surface is varied, and the substratum abounds with limestone of good quality, which is extensively burnt into lime. Hellaby Hall, an ancient mansion on the property of Sir R. J. Eden, is now a farmhouse. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 15.; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Scarborough. The great tithes have been commuted for £51. 10., and the vicarial for £100; the glebe comprises 35 acres. The church is in the later English style, with a square embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, and contains, at the extremity of the south aisle, a chapel called the Holm Choir, formerly belonging to the mansion of Holm Hall. Schools are supported in connexion with the Establishment.

Stainton-By-Langworth (St. John the Baptist)

STAINTON-BY-LANGWORTH (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 5 miles (W.) from Wragby; containing, with the hamlets of Newbell and Reasby, 222 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 18. 4.; patron, the Earl of Scarborough, who, with Earl Manvers, is impropriator. The great tithes have been commuted for £366, and the small for £170: the vicar has a glebe of 19 acres.

Stainton-Dale

STAINTON-DALE, a township, in the parish of Scalby, union of Scarborough, Pickering lythe, N. riding of York, 8½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Scarborough; containing 306 inhabitants. The township comprises about 2970 acres, of which the greater portion is a moorland tract extending along the coast. The soil, and the manorial rights of the liberty and royalty, belong to certain freeholders; and the inhabitants claim exemption from tithes and tolls, pursuant to a charter of King Stephen, who, in 1140, granted the manor to the Knights Templars, on condition that a chaplain should constantly be retained by them to perform divine service daily, and to make intercession for the kings of England: the chantry was dissolved in 1540. There is a school, built by subscription in 1832.

Stainton, Great (All Saints)

STAINTON, GREAT (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Sedgefield, N. E. division of Stockton ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 6 miles (N. E. by N.) from Darlington; containing, with the township of Elstob, 150 inhabitants, of whom 128 are in the township of Stainton. This place, called also Stainton-leStreet, derived that name from its situation on a Roman vicinal road leading from Old Durham and Mainsforth, through Bradbury, Mordon, and Sadberge, to the ford across the river Tees at Sockburn. The parish occupies elevated ground commanding extensive views of the sea and the Cleveland hills, and comprises 1948a. 36p., of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the soil is generally of a strong clayey quality. The village is situated on the road to Sedgefield, and the western branch of the Clarence railway passes through the township of Elstob. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; the tithes have been commuted for £283. 3.; the glebe comprises 47 acres. The church is situated on rising ground to the west of the village, and is a neat structure consisting of a nave and chancel: the parsonage-house is a commodious residence, fronting the south. A school was founded and endowed in 1749, by the Rev. Thomas Nicholson, and has since received several donations, chiefly from the trustees of Lord Crewe's charities.

Stainton-Le-Vale (St. Andrew)

STAINTON-LE-VALE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6 miles (N. E.) from Market Rasen; containing 148 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4.17. 6.; net income, £99; patron, J. Angerstein, Esq.

Stainton, Little

STAINTON, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Bishopton, union of Sedgefield, S. W. division of Stockton ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 7 miles (N. E.) from Darlington; containing 74 inhabitants. It belonged to the family of Conyers, who in the year 1613 assigned the lands to their tenants, of whom the Elstobs and Wellfoots were the principal; in 1684, the freeholds were the property of the families of Tatham, Fewler, Allinson, Newton, and others. The township comprises 1083a. 1r. 21p., of which 637½ acres are arable, 376 pasture, 60 woodland, and 10 waste. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £9. 10., and the impropriate for £136. 6.

Stainton, Market (St. Michael)

STAINTON, MARKET (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, N. division of the wapentake of Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Wragby; containing 184 inhabitants. This was formerly a market-town, from which circumstance it derived the adjunct to its name; and in the centre of the present village is a spacious green which was the ancient market-place. The market was long ago discontinued, and a fair held on the 29th of October was removed to Horncastle in 1768. The parish comprises 1123 acres. Stainton Hall, a handsome mansion, was built by the late John Loft, Esq. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £66; patron and incumbent, the Rev. John Loft. The church is a neat structure, repaired and beautified by the late Mr. Loft.