Stibbard - Stixwould

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

205-207

Citation Show another format:

'Stibbard - Stixwould', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 205-207. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51303 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Stibbard (All Saints)

STIBBARD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Fakenham; containing 453 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1468 acres, of which 1200 are arable, 50 woodland, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the surface is boldly undulated. The village is situated on the road from Fakenham to "Wells, and is large, and irregularly built, consisting of widely-scattered houses. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Colkerk, and valued in the king's books at £11. 13. 4.: the glebe contains 23a. 2r. 34p. The church is chiefly in the decorated and later styles, with a square tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. At the inclosure in 1808, 23½ acres were allotted to the poor.

Stibbington (St. John the Baptist)

STIBBINGTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Stamford, hundred of Norman-Cross, county of Huntingdon, 1 mile (E. by S.) from Wansford; containing, with Sibson hamlet, 697 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the navigable river Nene, and on the great north road; and comprises good arable and pasture land, incumbent on a layer of gravel. There are numerous quarries, supplying a coarse but durable freestone which is used for building; and about 50 hands are employed at a paper-mill. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 6½.; net income, £431; patron, the Duke of Bedford: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1807. The church is in the Norman style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stickford (St. Helen)

STICKFORD (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, W. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5½ miles (S. W.) from Spilsby; containing 426 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Spilsby to Boston, and comprises by computation 800 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 6.; net income, £133; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for land, at the inclosure of the East fen. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stickney (St. Luke)

STICKNEY (St. Luke), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, W. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 9 miles (N.) from Boston; containing 895 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Boston to Spilsby, and comprises 2000 acres, of which about 1200 are pasture, and the remainder arable. Some parts command an extensive prospect of a rich and well-wooded tract of country, intersected with fen-drains supplying facilities of communication with Boston. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 11.3.; net income, £356; patron, the Rev. George Coltman. The tithes have been commuted, partly for fen land, and partly for corn-rents; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe altogether contains about 180 acres. The church is a handsome edifice in the later English style, and contains about 450 sittings. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school, founded and endowed by William Lovell in 1678. Francis Thurkell in 1811 left £29 per annum, which, with other bequests amounting to £14 per annum, are distributed among the poor.

Stidd, or Stede, Lancashire.—See Dutton.

STIDD, or Stede, Lancashire.—See Dutton.

Stiffkey (St. John)

STIFFKEY (St. John), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of North Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (E.) from Wells; containing 487 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the sea, and comprises 2227a. 1r. 31p., of which about 1263 acres are arable, 264 pasture and meadow, 589 in salt-marshes, and 78 woodland. The village is beautifully situated in a deep and romantic valley, on the banks of the Stiff key, a rapid stream which discharges itself into Blakeney harbour, about a mile and a half to the north-east. The living comprises the united rectories of St. John and St. Mary, with the rectory of Morston annexed, valued in the king's books at £25, and in the gift of the family of Townshend. The church of St. John is chiefly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and has a handsome monument on the north side of the chancel to Nathaniel Bacon: St. Mary's church has gone to decay. A portion of the old Hall, which has been in a state of dilapidation for some years, is now used as a farm-house; it was built by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knt., lord keeper of the great seal.

Stifford (St. Mary)

STIFFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Chafford, S. division of Essex, 10 miles (S. E.) from Romford; containing 402 inhabitants. The parish is on the Horndon road, and takes its name from a ford over a stream that flows into the river Thames; it comprises 1547a. 3r. 9p., of which about 1271 acres are arable, 241 pasture, and 35 woodland. Extensive chalk pits have been worked for the last two centuries. The village is pleasantly situated, and has many well-built houses. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the gift of R. Wingfield, Esq. and the Embroiderers' Company in fee: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe comprises 26 acres. The church is a neat structure of the time of Edward I., with a spire; it contains an altar-tomb to David Percy with a Norman inscription in Saxon characters, and the effigy of a monk in brass with an inscription in Latin to Randulph Peachey, formerly rector of the parish.

Stillingfleet (St. Helen)

STILLINGFLEET (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of York, partly in the E. division of Ainsty wapentake, W. riding, but chiefly in the wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, E. riding of York; including the townships of Acaster-Selby and Kelfield, and containing 921 inhabitants, of whom 418 are in the township of Stillingfleet with Moreby, 7½ miles (S. by W.) from York. The parish consists of 5820 acres by computation. The village, which is scattered, lies in the vale of a small rivulet, one mile east of the Ouse. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 7. 6.; net income, £412; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of York, who, as trustees of St. Mary's school, are impropriators. The church is an ancient structure with some portions in the Norman style, and attached to it is a chapel containing a cross-legged figure in armour, of one of the family of Moreby. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school partly supported by subscription.—See Moreby.

Stillington

STILLINGTON, a township, in the parish of RedMarshall, union of Sedgefield, S. W. division of Stockton ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 8 miles (N. W. by W.) from Stockton; containing 67 inhabitants. Merton College, Oxford, had lands here at a very early date, as in 1367 William de la Pole held some property in Stilyngton, of the master of the college, by the service of one rose; in the 17th century the Morpeths possessed some interest in the place. The township lies to the north-west of Red-Marshall, from which it is separated by a portion of Bishopton; it comprises by measurement 1087 acres, of which 824 are arable, 259 pasture, and 4 road and waste. The main line of the Clarence railway passes through the township, and the Durham branch strikes off here. Tithe rentcharges have been awarded, of which £65 are payable to the rector, and £56. 6. 8. to Christ's Hospital, Sherburn.

Stillington (St. Nicholas)

STILLINGTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 10 miles (N.) from York; containing 748 inhabitants. This parish, the surface of which is rather elevated, consists of 2013a. 1r. 24p., and is watered on the east by the Foss. Stillington Park, the seat of Col. Croft, is a beautiful residence, standing on high ground near the right bank of the river. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of York, valued in the king's books at £4. 15. 5.; net income, £120; impropriator, Col. Croft. The great tithes have been commuted for £5. 14., and the vicarial for £41; the glebe comprises 8½ acres, with a good house. The present church, which is in the early English style, with a square tower, was built in 1841, at a cost of £800, and is conveniently situated in the centre of the pleasing and rural village. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a national and an infants' school. The celebrated Laurence Sterne held this living, and resided at Sutton in the neighbourhood.

Stilton (St. Mary)

STILTON (St. Mary), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Norman-Cross, county of Huntingdon, 12½ miles (N. N. W.) from Huntingdon; containing 817 inhabitants. This place takes its name, according to Stukeley, from Stivecle, signifying "stiff clay;" and is situated upon the Roman Ermin-street. It gives name to the famous cheese so called, great quantities of which are sold here, though it is made in Leicestershire, twenty miles distant. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 5. 10.; net income, £355; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1805. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A quarter of a mile from the village is a fine spring, at one period celebrated for the cure of ulcerated legs, a property which it is said to have lost. To the south-east are the remains of an ancient circular encampment.

Stinchcombe (St. Cyril)

STINCHCOMBE (St. Cyril), a parish, in the union of Dursley, Upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (W. by N.) from Dursley; containing 393 inhabitants. The parish embraces a portion of the Cotswold hills, and consists of 1393 acres, of which 55 are common or waste land. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £65; patron, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol; impropriators, P. B. Purnell, Esq., and others, whose tithes have been commuted for £240.

Stinsford (St. Michael)

STINSFORD (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of George, Dorchester division of Dorset, 1¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Dorchester; containing 392 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 1.; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Ilchester. The great tithes have been commuted for £ 115, and the vicarial for £190; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe comprises an acre. In the chancel of the church is a stone recording the death of Wadham Strangeways, at Bridport, whilst opposing the rebellion of the Duke of Monmouth. Here are some remarkable circular sand-pits.

Stirchley (St. James)

STIRCHLEY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Madeley, Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 3 miles (W. by S.) from Shiffuall; containing 301 inhabitants. It comprises 829 acres, of which 39 are common or waste land. The Shropshire canal passes through. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 5. 10., and in the gift of Revel Phillips, Esq., and others: the tithes have been commuted for £190, and the glebe contains 45½ acres.

Stirton

STIRTON, with Thorlby, a township, in the parish of Kildwick, union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 1¼ mile (N. W.) from Skipton; containing, with the hamlet of Holme-Bridge, 132 inhabitants. The township contains by computation 3850 acres, most of which is in pasture. The two villages of Stirton and Thorlby lie on the road from Skipton to Gargrave, and nearly adjoin each other. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £14,payable to the Dean and Chapter of Christ-Church, Oxford.

Stisted (All Saints)

STISTED (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Braintree, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Braintree; containing 911 inhabitants. This parish is bounded by the river Blackwater, and exhibits much variety of surface and scenery, it comprises 2913a. 2r. 31p., of which about 2224 acres are arable, 337 pasture, and 288 wood. There are several stately mansions, and the village is beautifully situated on ground sloping gently to the river. The living is a rectory, in the patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury, valued in the king's books at £22: the tithes have been commuted for £750, and the glebe comprises 154 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, with a tower on the south side surmounted by a shingled spire, and contains some interesting monuments.

Stithians (St. Stedian)

STITHIANS (St. Stedian), a parish, in the union of Redruth, E. division of the hundred of Kerrier, W. division of Cornwall, 9 miles (S. W.) from Truro; containing 2530 inhabitants. This parish, which includes a part of the village of Ponsnooth, comprises by computation 3445 acres, whereof 2591 are arable and pasture, 59 wood, 693 furze, and 102 moor and waste; the surface is hilly, and the soil underlaid with granite. In Kennall Vale and in Cofawes Wood are mills for making gunpowder, which is chiefly used in the mines; and above the Kennall mills is a paper-mill. A cattlefair for stock is held on the Monday nearest to the 13th of July. The living is a vicarage, with that of PerranArworthal annexed, valued in the king's books at £14. 0. 10., and in the gift of the Earl of Falmouth: the great tithes have been commuted for £255. 7., and the vicarial for £322; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 50 acres. The church, which is 390 feet above the level of the sea, has a handsome embattled tower crowned with pinnacles. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The parish contains various ancient crosses enriched with sculpture; and in Cofawes Wood was formerly a chapel, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene.

Stittenham

STITTENHAM, a township, in the parish of Sheriff. Hutton, union of Malton, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 8¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Malton; containing 92 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1340 acres. The family of Gower, ancestors of the Duke of Sutherland, who is proprietor of the soil, were anciently seated here.

Stivichall (St. James)

STIVICHALL (St. James), a parish, in the union and N. division of the county, of Warwick, 1¾ mile (S. by W.) from Coventry; containing 99 inhabitants, and comprising 724 acres of a highly productive soil. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income £90; patron and impropriator, A. F. Gregory, Esq. The church was originally dependent on St. Michael's, Coventry; the present edifice was built by the Gregory family.

Stixwould (St. Peter)

STIXWOULD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, S. division of the wapentake of Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6¾ miles (W. S. W.) from Horncastle; containing 203 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 10.; net income, £70; patron and impropriator, C. Tumor, Esq. A convent of Cistercian nuns, in honour of the Blessed Virgin, was founded here in the reign of Stephen, by the Countess Lucy, relict of Ranulph, first earl of Chester; at the Dissolution it possessed a revenue of £163. 1. 2. Part of the porter's lodge is still remaining, as the out-building to a modern farmhouse. The manor belonged to Lord Anson, the circumnavigator.