Stodday - Stoke-Bliss

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

215-217

Citation Show another format:

'Stodday - Stoke-Bliss', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 215-217. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51306 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Stodday, with Ashton.—See Ashton.

STODDAY, with Ashton.—See Ashton.

Stodmarsh (St. Mary)

STODMARSH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bridge, hundred of Downhamford, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 4½ miles (E. N. E.) from Canterbury; containing 145 inhabitants. It comprises 690a. 1r. 9p., of which 259 acres are arable, 321 meadow, 61 pasture, 20 woodland, 11 hop-grounds, and 7 orchard and homesteads. The living is a donative, endowed with the rectorial tithes; net income, £128; patron, the Archdeacon of Canterbury. The church is in the early English style.

Stody (St. Mary)

STODY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of Holt, W. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (S. W. by S.) from Holt; containing 187 inhabitants. The parish comprises an area of 1276a. 3r. 26p., of which the greater portion is the property of Lady Suffield; 51 acres are common or waste. The village is in a picturesque dell, watered by a rivulet running into the Glaven. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Hunworth united, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 4., and in the patronage of Lady Suffield: the tithes of Stody have been commuted for £230, and the glebe contains 31 acres. The church is a cruciform structure with a circular embattled tower.

Stoford, or Stolford

STOFORD, or Stolford, a hamlet, in the parish of Stogursey, union of Williton, hundred of Cannington, W. division of Somerset; containing 122 inhabitants. An act was passed in 1846 for making a railway to this place from Bridgwater, and constructing a harbour here.

Stogumber (St. Mary)

STOGUMBER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 13 miles (N. W.) from Taunton; containing 1384 inhabitants. This parish, which is of considerable extent, is situated on the west of the Quantox hills, and some good red-stone is found in it fit for building purposes. The village, which is large, contains a post-office. A market was formerly held, on Saturday; and a fair still takes place, on May 6th, chiefly for cattle. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 18. 7½.; net income, £239; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Wells. The church is a handsome edifice consisting of a nave and aisles, in the later English style; some of the pillars, and the rood-loft, are richly ornamented, and the ancient open oak seats present good specimens of carving. There is a place of worship for Baptists. Roman coins have been discovered here.

Stogursey, or Stoke-Courcy (St. Andrew)

STOGURSEY, or Stoke-Courcy (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Cannington, W. division of Somerset, 8½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Bridgwater; containing, with the hamlets of Burton, Knighton, Shurton, Stoford, and Week, 1467 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the Bristol Channel, and comprises 5853 acres, of which 275 are common or waste land. The living is a vicarage, with that of Lilstock annexed, valued in the king's books at £16. 7. 6., and in the gift of Eton College. Certain tithes belonging to the rector of Huntspill were exchanged for corn-rents in 1800, under an inclosure act; and rent-charges in commutation of tithes, under the recent act, of £50, £800, and £370, are payable respectively to an impropriator, to the college, and the vicar. A Benedictine priory, a cell to the abbey of L'Onley, in Normandy, was founded here in the reign of Henry II.; it was valued at £58 per annum, and granted by Henry VI. to Eton College.

Stoke, near the city of Chester.—See Stoak.

STOKE, near the city of Chester.—See Stoak.

Stoke

STOKE, a township, in the parish of Acton, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 3½ miles (N. W.) from Nantwich; containing 119 inhabitants. It comprises 641 acres, partly a sandy and partly a clayey soil. The Chester canal passes through the township. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £18. 11. 6., and the impropriate tithes for £14.

Stoke

STOKE, a township, in the parish of Hope, union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 1½ mile (N. E.) from StoneyMiddleton; containing 46 inhabitants.

Stoke (St. Peter)

STOKE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoo, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 8½ miles (N. E.) from Rochester; containing 445 inhabitants. It comprises 2923 acres, of which 1340 are arable, 612 pasture, 940 saltings, and 31 water. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 11. 8.; net income, £180 per annum; patron, J. Pearson, Esq.

Stoke (Holy Cross)

STOKE (Holy Cross), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (S.) from Norwich; containing 453 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1626 acres. There are extensive mustard, oil, and flour mills; and starch-works. Pettysessions are held on alternate Fridays. The living is a vicarage; net income, £162; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Norwich: the incumbent has a glebe of about 3 acres. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with a square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Baptists. The sum of £16. 16., derived from land allotted at the inclosure, is annually distributed in fuel among the poor.

Stoke (St. Milburgh)

STOKE (St. Milburgh), a parish, in the union of Ludlow, partly in the hundred of Munslow, but chiefly in the liberty of the borough of Wenlock, S. division of Salop, 6 miles (N. E. by N.) from Ludlow; containing, with the chapelry of Heath, 596 inhabitants, of whom 533 are in Stoke township. The parish comprises 5121a. 3r. 30p.; the surface is varied, and the scenery in many parts beautifully picturesque. Coal is found; there are some mines in operation, and also quarries of limestone and flagstone. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. George Morgan. The incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £370, and the glebe comprises 80 acres, with a house. The church is a very ancient structure, said to have been built by Milburgha, daughter of Merwald, king of Mercia; it is situated in a romantic dell, in which is a spring, supposed to be one of the sources of the river Lud. At Heath is a chapel of ease in the Norman style, which is greatly admired by antiquaries. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists; and a school has been built on land given by the late Earl of Pembroke: the Hon. Sidney Herbert liberally contributes to its support, and also bestows a large sum to provide clothing for the poor. Old Parr lived for some time in the parish.

Stoke (St. Gregory)

STOKE (St. Gregory), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of North Curry, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Langport; containing, with the tythings of East Curry, Curry-Load, and Stathe, 1499 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north-east by the navigable river Parret, and on the north-west by the Tone, which is crossed by three bridges, one of them leading into the Isle of Athelney. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of North Curry, with a net income of £120; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Wells. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £388, and the vicar of North Curry receives a rent-charge of £147.

Stoke (St. Mary)

STOKE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of Taunton and Taunton-Dean, W. division of Somerset, 2½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Taunton; containing, with the hamlets of Broughton and Stoke-Hill, 315 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 911 acres. Stone is quarried for building, and for burning into lime. The living is a rectory and donative, in the gift of Lord Portman: the tithes have been commuted for £110. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Stoke

STOKE, a tything, in the parish of Bourne, poorlaw union of Whitchurch, hundred of Evingar, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 186 inhabitants.

Stoke, with Aston, Stafford.—See Aston.

STOKE, with Aston, Stafford.—See Aston.

Stoke (St. Michael)

STOKE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Foleshill, N. division of the county of Warwick, 1½ mile (E.) from Coventry; containing 936 inhabitants. The parish consists of 920 acres of the richest soil, and is intersected by the Coventry canal. The living is a vicarage not in charge, with that of Sow or Walsgrave annexed, in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £333; impropriator of Stoke, W. Pridmore, Esq., and of Sow, the Earl of Craven. The great tithes of Stoke have been commuted for £102. 16.; and the vicarial for £97. 8., with a glebe of 23 acres.

Stoke-Abbas (St. Mary)

STOKE-ABBAS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Beaminster, Bridport division of Dorset, 2 miles (W. by S.) from Beaminster; containing 808 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2303a. 2r. 5p. Here is a stone-quarry, for building purposes, and for burning into lime. From 15 to 20 persons are engaged in a twine manufactory; and a sailcloth, twine, and shoe-thread factory employs 60 or 70 hands. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 15., and in the gift of New College, Oxford: the rectorial tithes have been commuted for £420, and some impropriate tithes for £15. 11.; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 60 acres. The church is a small ancient building with a tower. The Rev. W. Crowe, late public orator of the university of Oxford, was for some time rector.

Stoke-Albany (St. Botolph)

STOKE-ALBANY (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of Harborough, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Harborough; containing 362 inhabitants. Stoke, which formerly gave name to a hundred, has the addition of Albany from the family of Albini, the ancient possessors of the lordship. Robert de Todeni, a noble Norman to whom the Conqueror gave several lordships, was in possession of lands here at the time of the Domesday survey; and his descendants continued to hold them till the manor passed by marriage to Robert de Roos, who died 13th Edward I. The parish is situated on the road from Harborough to Rockingham, and comprises 1659a. 3r. 30p., of which 500 acres are arable, 1062 pasture, and 97 woodland; the soil in the northern part is a strong clay, and the rest a light earth, with a substratum of limestone. Standing on an eminence is Stoke Hall, the seat of R. B. Humfrey, Esq., surrounded with plantations. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Watson family, with a net income of £216: the rectorial and impropriate tithes have each been commuted for £30.

Stoke-Ash (All Saints)

STOKE-ASH (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hartismere, W. division of Suffolk, 3½ miles (S. W.) from Eye; containing 423 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from London to Norwich, by way of Ipswich; and comprises 1167a. 3r. 29p. Pettysessions are held monthly. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 1. 3., and in the gift of the Rev. S. W. Bull: there is a glebe-house; the glebe contains about 15½ acres, and the tithes have been commuted for £358. The church consists of a nave and chancel, with an embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Stoke-Bardolph

STOKE-BARDOLPH, a township, in the parish of Gedling, union of Basford, S. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton and of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (E. N. E.) from Nottingham; containing 216 inhabitants. A chapel of ease, a neat building, was erected in 1844, at a cost of £300.

Stoke-Bishop

STOKE-BISHOP, a tything, in the parish of Westbury-upon-Trym, union of Clifton, Lower division of the hundred of Henbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 2¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Bristol; containing 2651 inhabitants. The river Avon bounds the place on the south-west.

Stoke-Bishop's (St. Mary)

STOKE, BISHOP'S (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 7 miles (S.) from Winchester; containing 1137 inhabitants. The London and South-Western railway passes on the west, and at a short distance a branch diverges to Gosport, in a south-east direction; a branch also diverges hence, in a north-west direction, to Salisbury. The Winchester canal runs through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 17. 6., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £612. 10.; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 21 acres.

Stoke-Bliss

STOKE-BLISS, a parish, in the union of Tenbury, partly in the Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, but chiefly in the hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 6 miles (S. E.) from Tenbury; containing, with the chapelry of Little Kyre, 351 inhabitants, of whom 207 are in Stoke-Bliss township. The parish is situated on the road from Tenbury to Bromyard, and comprises by admeasurement 2077 acres, of which 1071 form the Herefordshire portion. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 16. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £360; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 35 acres. The church is in the early English style.