Stoke-Bruerne - Stoke-Lyne

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

217-220

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'Stoke-Bruerne - Stoke-Lyne', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 217-220. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51307&strquery=stoke+cannon Date accessed: 01 November 2014.


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Stoke-Bruerne (St. Mary)

STOKE-BRUERNE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Towcester, hundred of Cleley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (E. N. E.) from Towcester; containing 800 inhabitants, of whom 436 are in the township. The whole parish comprises 2616a. 1r. 23p., whereof 1319 acres are in the township. The Grand Junction canal passes through a tunnel two miles in length, partly in this parish and partly in that of Blisworth. The females are employed in bobbin-lace making. At the inclosure of the parish in 1840, five acres were appropriated for recreation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £30; patrons, the Principal and Fellows of Brasenose College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £539, and the glebe consists of 64 acres. The church is ancient, in the later Norman style, with a tower: it contains a brass monument to the Rev. Dr. Lightfoot. A national school was built by subscription in 1840. Thomas Bosenhoe, in 1510, left 14 acres of land now producing £28 per annum, one moiety for the repairs of the church, and the other for the poor. Another sum, derived from the rent of two cottages and 2½ acres of land, is applied to charitable purposes.

Stoke-By-Clare (St. Augustine)

STOKE-BY-CLARE (St. Augustine), a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 12 miles (N. W. by N.) from Halstead; containing 868 inhabitants. Richard de Clare, Earl of Hereford, in 1124 removed the monks of Bec, whom his father had placed in the castle of Clare, to this village, first into the parochial church of St. Augustine, and afterwards to a church built for them, and dedicated to St. John the Baptist. In 1415, Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March, then patron, procured power to change the society into a college of secular priests, for a dean, six prebendaries, eight vicars, and other officers; and this college was valued in the 26th of Henry VIII. at £324. 4. 1. per annum: Matthew Parker, Archbishop of Canterbury, was the last dean. A modern house which now stands upon the site was the residence of the well-known miser, John Elwes. The parish comprises 2361 acres, of which 48 are common or waste land: the navigable river Stour passes on the south. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £130; it is in the patronage of Lady Rush, and the tithes have been commuted for £740. 18. Sir Gervaise Elwes, Bart., in 1678 bequeathed a rent-charge of £10 for teaching children; and there is a fund for apprenticing children amounting to £33 per annum, the rent of 12 acres of land. An almshouse, consisting of three cottages occupied by six widows, was founded by Richard Brown in 1526.

Stoke-Cannon (St. Mary Magdalene)

STOKE-CANNON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of Wonford, Wonford and S. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Exeter; containing 490 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1100 acres, and is crossed by the rivers Exe and Culm; the latter intersects the village, and turns a paper-mill giving employment to about 30 persons. The railroad from Bristol to Exeter also passes through the village. Thirty-two houses, and as many barns, out-houses, and stables, were destroyed by fire here, in April, 1847. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, the appropriators: the great tithes have been commuted for £140, and those of the perpetual curate for £128. The church and manor were given by King Athelstan to the Cathedral of Exeter: the edifice, with the exception of the tower, was rebuilt in 1836; the font is an object of great interest, supposed by antiquaries to be at least 700 years old, and the church contains a monument to the memory of a son of Bishop Hall.

Stoke-Charity (St. Michael)

STOKE-CHARITY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Buddlesgate, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 6½ miles (S. by E.) from Whitchurch; containing 167 inhabitants. The South-Western railway passes on the south. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 13. 6½., and in the gift of Corpus Christi College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £420; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church is a very ancient massive edifice, and contains several curious monumental inscriptions.

Stoke-Climsland

STOKE-CLIMSLAND, a parish, in the union of Launceston, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall, 3 miles (N.) from Callington; containing 2073 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the north by the river Inney, which runs into the Tamar on the east; and is situated on the road from Launceston to Callington. It comprises 8717a. 1r. 12p., of which about 5500 acres are arable, 800 pasture, 760 woodland, coppice, and plantation, 180 orchard, 1300 common, and the rest waste, &c. The soil is light; the surface hilly, and the scenery picturesque and beautiful. A fair for cattle is held on May 29th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £40, and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of the duchy of Cornwall; net income, £621. The church is a very spacious structure, with a fine tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists.

Stoke-D'abernon (St. Mary)

STOKE-D'ABERNON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Epsom, Second division of the hundred of Elmbridge, W. division of Surrey, 1 mile (S. E. by E.) from Cobham; containing, with the hamlet of Oxshot, 352 inhabitants. This place formerly belonged to the Vincents, who were visited here by Queen Elizabeth. The parish is bounded on the south and west by the river Mole: in the eastern part the soil is a deep clay; towards the north-east it is gravelly, and in other parts there is a good hazel mould. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 3.; net income, £418; patron, the Rev. Hugh Smith. The church contains monuments to the Vincent family; the pulpit is richly embellished.

Stoke-Damerall

STOKE-DAMERALL, a parish, in the hundred of Roborough, Roborough and S. divisions of Devon; adjoining the borough of Plymouth, and containing 33,820 inhabitants. This parish, which includes Devonport and Morice-Town, is one of the most extensive in the county; the village occupies an elevated site, and comprises several rows of excellent houses, a crescent, and some private mansions of more than ordinary beauty. Among the important public structures in the parish are, the immense reservoir of the Devonport Water Company, which supplies the government establishments and the neighbourhood in general; the military hospital, a spacious edifice of grey marble, erected in 1797, on the west side of Stonehouse Creek, comprising four large square buildings, of similar size and form, connected by a piazza of forty-one arches; and the Blockhouse, occupying an eminence north of the village, surrounded by a fosse and drawbridge, and commanding a most magnificent prospect. On the eastern bank of the Hamoaze is Morice-Town, consisting principally of four streets, and so named from a former lord of the manor. A ferry was established here in 1800, to communicate with Cornwall, at Tor Point, on the opposite shore: a floating bridge, worked by steam, and held in its course by chains across the bed of the river, was subsequently completed. The sides of the harbour are lined with wharfs, and in the town is a large establishment called the Tamar Brewery, At a short distance is the powdermagazine, which, although it covers an area of five acres, was insufficient in time of war, when line-of-battle ships were fitted up as floating magazines. At Cross Hill is a very extensive quarry of durable slate. A fair is held on Whit-Monday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 18. 9., and in the gift of the family of St. Aubyn: the tithes have been commuted for £628, and the glebe contains 23½ acres. The church is a mean but spacious edifice, with a low tower. A second church has been erected, dedicated to St. Michael, which is in the gift of the Rector; and other churches are noticed under the head of Devonport.

Stoke-Doyle (St. Rumbald)

STOKE-DOYLE (St. Rumbald), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Navisford, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (S. W. by S.) from Oundle; containing 169 inhabitants. It is bounded on the east by the navigable river Nene, and comprises 1600 acres, of which about 40 are wood, and the rest arable and pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 2. 11.; income, £142; patron, G. Capron, Esq. There is a glebe-house, and the glebe consists of 36 acres. The church, built about 1715, is in the Grecian style, and contains a fine monument to the memory of Judge Ward.

Stoke, Dry (St. Andrew)

STOKE, DRY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, partly in the hundred of Gartree, S. division of Leicestershire, but chiefly in the hundred of Wrandike, county of Rutland, 3½ miles (S. S. W.) from Uppingham; containing, with the liberty of Holy-Oakes, 51 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 2. 1., and in the gift of the Marquess of Exeter: the tithes have been commuted for a yearly rent-charge of £385; the glebe contains 28½ acres.

Stoke, Earl, county Wilts.—See Earl-Stoke.

STOKE, EARL, county Wilts.—See Earl-Stoke.

Stoke, East (St. Mary)

STOKE, EAST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wareham and Purbeck, hundred of Winfrith, Wareham division of Dorset, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Wareham; containing 590 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Wareham to Dorchester, and comprises by admeasurement 5860 acres, consisting of about equal portions of arable, pasture, and heath; the soil is various, comprehending several sandy and gravelly mixtures, with a little clay. The situation is pleasant, commanding a distant view of the Purbeck hills, and embracing a fertile valley watered by the river Froome. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 12. 11.; net income, £326; patrons, Sir W. Oglander, Bart. The church is a neat edifice, built by subscription, in 1827, at an expense of £1700. Bindon Abbey, in the parish, was founded in 1172, by Robert de Newburgh and Maud his wife, who endowed it for monks of the Cistercian order; it was dedicated to St. Mary, and at the Dissolution its revenue was valued at £229. 2. 1., and the site granted to Sir Thomas Poynings. The beautiful remains consist principally of an angle of the tower of the church, and part of the walls, with the foundations.

Stoke, East (St. Oswald)

STOKE, EAST (St. Oswald), a parish, in the union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 3¾ miles (S. W.) from Newark; containing 385 inhabitants. On Stoke field was fought, in 1487, the decisive battle between the armies of Henry VII., and John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, who had espoused the cause of Lambert Simnel; the earl and 4000 of his followers were slain. This is said to be the first action in which cannon was used with success. The village is pleasantly situated on the southern bank of the river Trent, and on the Roman fosse-road. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the livings of Coddington and Syerston annexed, valued in the king's books at £8. 13.; net income, £372; patron, the Chancellor of the Cathedral of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for 250 acres of land, in 1795. The church is on an eminence in front of the Hall. There is a chapel of ease at Elston. An hospital dedicated to St. Leonard was founded here before the time of Henry I., for a master and brethren, a chaplain, and several sick persons; the revenue at the Dissolution was valued at £9.

Stoke-Edith (St. Mary)

STOKE-EDITH (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Radlow, union and county of Hereford, 7¼ miles (E.) from Hereford; containing 347 inhabitants. It comprises 1674 acres, of which 20 are common or waste land. The subsoil is a deep clay; the surface is flat, except in Stoke Park, which is elevated, and commands extensive and beautiful prospects. The living is a rectory, with the perpetual curacy of Westhide annexed, valued in the king's books at £15, and in the gift of Edward T. Foley, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £320; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 103 acres. An ancient sword, some curious beads, several human skeletons with their faces downwards, and other relics, have been found at Radlow Bush, in the parish.

Stoke-Ferry (All Saints)

STOKE-FERRY (All Saints), a market-town and parish, in the union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 38 miles (W. by S.) from Norwich, and 88½ (N. N. E.) from London; containing 663 inhabitants. The town is situated on the banks of the river Wissey, which is navigable up to it, and on the road from Lynn to Thetford and Bury. An extensive traffic is carried on in malt, corn, timber, and coal. In the reign of Henry III. the inhabitants obtained a grant for holding a weekly market and an annual fair, which was confirmed by Henry VI. The market was for a long period disused, but has been revived, and is now held on Friday, principally for corn; a large fair takes place on Dec. 6th, for horses, cattle, &c., and a statute for hiring servants on the Thursday after Old Michaelmas-day. The parish comprises 2059a. 3r. 25p., of which about 1232 acres are arable, 674 pasture and meadow, and 59 woodland; the substratum is chiefly limestone. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £100: the great tithes have been commuted for £247, and the small tithes for £227. 9. The church had formerly a square tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stoke-Fleming (St. Peter)

STOKE-FLEMING (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Kingsbridge, hundred of Coleridge, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 2½ miles (S. S. W.) from Dartmouth; containing 736 inhabitants. It is situated on the sea-coast, and comprises 3013 acres, of which 2300 are arable, 500 pasture, and 200 woodland; the soil is light and thin, but of good quality. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £31. 6. 0½.; net income, £649; patron, the Rev. W. Farwell. The church has a Norman tower, built apparently at a much earlier period than the body of the edifice: there are some interesting monuments.

Stoke-Gabriel (St. Gabriel)

STOKE-GABRIEL (St. Gabriel), a parish, in the union of Totnes, hundred of Haytor, Paignton and S. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (S. E. by E.) from Totnes; containing 691 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres; the surface is hilly, and the soil in general a rich loam. The navigable river Dart runs on the south. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 11. 10½.; net income, £163; patrons, Sir S. H. Northcote, Bart., the Executors of the Rev. J. Templar, and the Rev. F. Belfield, in turn. The church contains an ancient wooden screen. There is a place of worship for Baptists. Capt. John Davis, the discoverer of Davis' Straits, was born here.

Stoke-Gifford (St. Michael)

STOKE-GIFFORD (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Clifton, Upper division of the hundred of Henbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Bristol; containing 480 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Bristol to Gloucester, and comprises 3000 acres by computation; the surface is flat, the soil in some parts sandy and in others clayey. In the parish are several quarries; and here is found a stone called "the landscape stone," which is sold at Clifton as the produce of that parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; total net income, £60; patron, the Duke of Beaufort, who holds all the tithes, and pays the vicar a stipend of £25. The church was built in 1150, and has been the burial-place of several noble families. John Silcocks, in 1741, bequeathed £200, directing the interest to be applied in teaching children.

Stoke-Golding

STOKE-GOLDING, a chapelry, in the parish of Hinckley, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 2¾ miles (N. W.) from Hinckley; containing 663 inhabitants. The Ashby-de-la-Zouch canal passes through it. The chapel is dedicated to St. Margaret. A free grammar school was endowed by Hester Hodges, in 1678, with 74 acres of land, now producing about £100 per annum.

Stoke-Goldington (St. Peter)

STOKE-GOLDINGTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Newport-Pagnell, on the road to Northampton; containing, with the hamlet of Eakley-Lanes, 855 inhabitants, of whom 754 are in the township of Stoke-Goldington. The parish comprises 1675 acres, two-thirds arable and one-third pasture, well wooded. The soil is strong, and suited especially to the growth of wheat and beans; the substratum, to a considerable extent, consists of limestone. The river Ouse bounds the parish on the east. The females are employed in making lace. The living is a rectory, united in 1736 to that of Gayhurst, and valued in the king's books at £14. 6. 3. The tithes of the commons were commuted for land in 1770. The church is in the early English style, with two chancels and a tower. The Independents have a place of worship; and a national school is supported by subscription. There was formerly a chapel at Eakley, which place is said to have been a distinct parish.

Stoke-Hammond (St. Mary)

STOKE-HAMMOND (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Leighton-Buzzard, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (S.) from Fenny-Stratford; containing 407 inhabitants. It is situated near the London and Birmingham railway, and comprises by admeasurement 1523 acres of land, nearly equally divided between arable and pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 9. 4½.; net income, £249; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1774. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stoke-Hill

STOKE-HILL, a hamlet, in the parish of Stoke St. Mary, union of Taunton, hundred of Taunton and Taunton-Dean, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 80 inhabitants.

Stoke-Lacy (St. Peter and St. Paul)

STOKE-LACY (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Bromyard; containing 413 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Bromyard to Hereford, and comprises 1992a. 1r. 8p., of which nearly half are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with 64 acres of hopgrounds. The surface is hilly, and the subsoil a strong clay; stone of excellent quality is quarried for building, and limestone is extensively used for agricultural purposes. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of John Kempson, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £315. 12.; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains about 20 acres. The body of the church is dilapidated; the chancel has lately been rebuilt by the incumbent, and is considered one of the finest specimens in the county of the early English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Stoke-Lane (St. Michael)

STOKE-LANE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Shepton-Mallet, hundred of Whitestone, E. division of Somerset, 4 miles (N. E.) from SheptonMallet; containing 1056 inhabitants. The parish is situated about a mile north of the road from Wells to Frome, and comprises 2074 acres, of which about 256 are arable, 1607 meadow and pasture, and 165 in woods and plantations. The soil in general is shallow and damp; on the north side of the Mendip hills it rests upon a layer of red gravel, and in the other parts there is a substratum of limestone and firestone. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income £120; patron, the Vicar of Doulting; impropriator, Richard Strachey, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £75, and the vicarial for a like sum. The church was rebuilt in the early English style in 1838.

Stoke, Limpley

STOKE, LIMPLEY, a tything, in the chapelry of Winsley, parish, union, and hundred of Bradford, Westbury and N. divisions, and Trowbridge and Bradford subdivisions, of Wilts, 3 miles (W. by S.) from Bradford; containing 377 inhabitants. There is a chapel dedicated to St. Mary.

Stoke-Lyne (St. Peter)

STOKE-LYNE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 4¼ miles (N. by W.) from Bicester; containing, with the hamlets of Bainton and Fewcott, 601 inhabitants, of whom 347 are in Stoke-Lyne township. The living is a discharged vicarage; net income, £173; patrons, the Trustees of J. Bullock, Esq.; impropriators, the family of Coles. The tithes of the township were commuted for land and a money payment in 1793.