Stoke-Mandeville - Stoke, West

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

220-224

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'Stoke-Mandeville - Stoke, West', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 220-224. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51308 Date accessed: 24 November 2014.


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Stoke-Mandeville (St. Mary)

STOKE-MANDEVILLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 2¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Wendover; containing, with the hamlet of Prestwood, 493 inhabitants. The living is annexed, with those of Buckland and Quarrendon, to the vicarage of Bierton.

Stoke-Near-Nayland (St. Mary)

STOKE-NEAR-NAYLAND (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Babergh, W. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N. E. by N.) from Nayland; containing 1362 inhabitants. A monastery existed here in the middle of the 10th century, to which Earl Alfgar, and his daughters Æthelfled and Ægelfled, made considerable donations, it being the burial-place of that noble family. In the parish are, Gifford Hall, an ancient structure with a fine entrance gateway, built in the early part of the reign of Henry VIII.; and Tendring Hall, the seat of Sir J. R. Rowley, Bart., formerly the residence of the dukes of Norfolk, where the Earl of Surrey wrote his poems. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £19. 0. 10., and in the gift of Sir J. R. Rowley: the great tithes, belonging to P. Mannock, Esq., have been commuted for £1254, and the vicarial tithes for £305. The church is a spacious structure in the later English style, with a finely-proportioned tower, and contains numerous monuments and some ancient brasses. A chapel for the inhabitants of Leavenheath has lately been erected by subscription: the living is endowed with three acres of land, and £1100 in the funds. There is a Roman Catholic chapel. Sir John Capel, lord mayor of London in 1503, was a native of Stoke. The Rev. William Jones, the wellknown author, was vicar.

Stoke-Next-Guildford (St. John the Evangelist)

STOKE-NEXT-GUILDFORD (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Guildford, First division of the hundred of Woking, W. division of Surrey, ¾ of a mile (N.) from Guildford; containing 2054 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2314 acres, of which 88 are common or waste; it is intersected by the Wey canal, and situated on the road to Kingston. Part of it is included within the limits of the borough of Guildford. There are a paper and a flour mill. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 0. 5., and in the gift of certain Trustees: the tithes have been commuted for £679. The church is in the later English style, and contains several neat monuments. James Price bequeathed Bank annuities to the poor, producing a dividend of £96; and three almshouses for six women above 60 years of age, were founded and endowed by Henry and William Parsons, Esqrs. Mrs. Charlotte Smith, the novelist, was buried here.

Stoke, North

STOKE, NORTH, a township, in the parish of South Stoke, union of Grantham, wapentake of Winnibriggs and Threo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 2¾ miles (N. by W.) from Colsterworth; containing 118 inhabitants. It comprises 1834a. 27p. of land, the property of Christopher Tumor, Esq., whose fine seat and park here greatly enhance the beauty of the scenery. The tithes were commuted in 1796, for land and corn-rents.

Stoke, North (St. Mary)

STOKE, NORTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wallingford, hundred of Langtree, county of Oxford, 2 miles (S.) from Wallingford; containing 770 inhabitants, of whom 160 are in the tything of North Stoke. The tything comprises 800 acres by computation. The living is a vicarage, with that of NewnhamMurren annexed, valued in the king's books at £14. 10.; net income, £568; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of St. John's College, Cambridge. There is a chapel of ease at Ipsden; and at Stoke-Row is a church dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, consecrated in Oct. 1846: the living is in the Vicar's gift.

Stoke, North (St. Martin)

STOKE, NORTH (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Keynsham, hundred of Bath-Forum, E. division of Somerset, 4¼ miles (N. W.) from Bath; containing 173 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 800 acres; in the upper part the soil rests upon oolite, and in the lower has a clayey subsoil. On the west flows the Avon, the ground gradually rising from the river to the heights of Lansdowne, which give the title of Marquess to the family of Petty. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £100; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe comprises 26 acres.

Stoke, North

STOKE, NORTH, a parish, in the hundred of Poling, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 5 miles (N. by E.) from Arundel; containing 89 inhabitants. The parish comprises 930 acres, of which 482 are arable and woodland, 281 meadow, and the remainder down: the river Arun separates it from South Stoke. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5. 14. 4½.; net income, £57; patron and impropriator, Colonel Wyndham. The church is a cruciform structure in the later English style. A canoe or ancient vessel was found in 1834, under an old drain lying in the course of an arm or tributary of the Arun, and was presented by the Earl of Egremont to the British Museum; it is 35 feet 4 inches in length, nearly 2 feet in depth, and between 4 and 5 in breadth. There are several barrows on the downs.

Stoke-Orchard

STOKE-ORCHARD, a chapelry, in the parish and hundred of Bishop's-Cleeve, union of Tewkesbury, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (S. E.) from Tewkesbury; containing 231 inhabitants, and comprising 1331 acres. The tithes have been commuted for £275. 10., and there is a glebe of three-quarters of an acre.

Stoke-Pero

STOKE-PERO, a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Carhampton, W. division of Somerset, 3 miles (S. by W.) from Porlock; containing 84 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 4000 acres of land, most of which is common. The soil rests on a bed of red gravel, and the rusty appearance of the water among the hills indicates the probability of iron-ore lying beneath. Dundry Beacon, a large mountain, is partly in the parish: its base is about twelve miles in circuit, and its height above the sea at high water is 1770 feet, being the loftiest eminence in the western part of England; it serves as a distant landmark, but the summit is often obscured by clouds. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 10. 10., and in the gift of John Quick, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £68, and the glebe contains 8 acres. The church is a small edifice, with a low tower.

Stoke-Poges (St. Giles)

STOKE-POGES (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Eton, hundred of Stoke, county of Buckingham, 2 miles (N.) from Slough; containing, with the chapelry of Ditton, and part of the village of Slough, 1528 inhabitants. The splendid mansion and park of Stoke were purchased of Mr. Granville Penn, by the Rt. Hon. Henry Labouchere, president of the Board of Trade, in 1848, for £62,000. A fair is held on Whit-Tuesday. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 17., and in the patronage of Lord Godolphin (the impropriator), with a net income of £319: the great tithes have been commuted for £150, and the vicarial for £68. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a national school is supported by bequests producing an income of £30. An hospital for four men and two women was founded in 1557, by Lord Hastings, of Sloughborough, who endowed it with a rent-charge of about £53, for a chantry priest and four bedesmen. It was originally in Stoke Park, and its noble founder, becoming one of its inmates, ended his days within its walls, and was buried in the chapel attached; the ancient building was pulled down in 1765, and the hospital refounded on its present site. The revenue, since augmented, is £142; the inmates are three brethren and two sisters, with a master. The churchyard is the scene of Gray's Elegy, and contains the remains of the poet; in the field adjoining, a large sarcophagus was erected to his memory in 1799, by the late Mr. Penn, of Stoke Park.

Stoke-Prior

STOKE-PRIOR, a parish, in the union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford; containing, with the township of Wickton, and part of Risbury, 468 inhabitants, of whom 320 are in Stoke-Prior township, 3 miles (S. E.) from Leominster. The parish is situated on the left bank of the river Lug, and comprises 2308 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Docklow annexed, and in the patronage of the Vicar of Leominster, with a net income of £132: the tithes of the parish, payable to the Bishop of Hereford, have been commuted for £142.

Stoke-Prior (St. Michael)

STOKE-PRIOR (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bromsgrove, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Droitwich, and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2 miles (S.) from Bromsgrove; containing 1576 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3808a. 3r. 24p. of very good land, mostly arable, and of undulated surface. It is situated near the road from Birmingham to Worcester, and traversed by that from Bromsgrove to Stratford-on-Avon, by way of Hanbury, Feckenham, and Alcester. A good sandstone is obtained, which has been much used for railway-bridges. On the bank of the Worcester and Birmingham canal here, are works belonging to the British Alkali Company, commenced in 1828: in 1830, a dry rock-salt shaft, from 10 to 40 feet in thickness, was reached, at a distance varying from 120 to 150 yards below the surface; and subsequently, a spring of saturated brine broke into the mine, since which the supply has appeared inexhaustible. Salt, akali, soap, and soda, with a variety of other chemical productions, are manufactured at these works, which occupy nearly nine acres of ground, consume about 500 tons of coal per week, and employ several hundred hands. Among the buildings is a chimney which, for gigantic dimensions and beautiful proportions, is perhaps unequalled in England. On the other side of the canal is a similar concern, carried on by the Imperial Alkali Company; and there are two manufactories for needles in the parish. The Birmingham and Gloucester railway has here the Bromsgrove and the Stoke-works stations. An act was passed in 1845, authorising the Great Western Company to make a line of four miles from Stoke to their Oxford and Wolverhampton line at Droitwich. The living is a discharged vicarage, with St. Godwald's chapel at Finstal, in the parish, united, valued in the king's books at £12; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester. The great tithes for the inclosures, and all the small tithes, were commuted for land in 1772; there is a glebe-house, with 150 acres of glebe land valued at £300 per annum. The church is a handsome structure in the Norman and early English styles, with a good tower, and contains a very ancient and beautiful font. A national school is supported by subscription, aided by £18 per annum from land bequeathed by Henry Smith, of London, in 1606. In excavating for the Birmingham railway, some Romanized-British remains were discovered.

Stoke-Rivers (St. Bartholomew)

STOKE-RIVERS (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Barnstaple, hundred of Sherwill, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Barnstaple; containing 299 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 2300 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14.14.7., and in the patronage of the Rev. Henry Hiern, incumbent: the tithes have been commuted for £245; there is a glebehouse, and the glebe contains about 63 acres, 13 of which are oak coppice. The church, exclusive of the tower, was rebuilt in 1831. An ancient earthwork in a wood here is supposed to have formed part of a city of the Britons; it measures 84 yards in length, and 60 in breadth, and has a deep ditch along three of its sides. In the parish is also a circular encampment called Burah Castle, 138 yards in diameter, situated on a very high hill, and commanding beautiful views.

Stoke, Rodney (St. Leonard)

STOKE, RODNEY (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Wells, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 5¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Wells; containing, with the hamlet of Draycott, 356 inhabitants. This was long the seat of the knightly family of Rodney, whose descendant, the distinguished admiral, was elevated to the peerage as Baron Rodney, of Rodney Stoke, in 1782, for the memorable victory he had achieved over the French fleet commanded by the Comte de Grasse. The parish is situated on the road from Wells to Axbridge, and comprises 2338a. 1r. 9p. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 12. 8½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Bath and Wells: the tithes have been commuted for £330; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 20¼ acres. The church is a small neat edifice, chiefly in the Norman style, with a handsome tower: the late Mr. Rickman considered the date of the stone font to be about 1220. In a chapel adjoining the chancel are several monuments of the Rodney family.

Stoke, Severn (St. Denis)

STOKE, SEVERN (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Upton, Lower division of the hundred of Pershore, Upton and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Upton; containing 744 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the left bank of the river Severn, and intersected by the road between Worcester and Tewkesbury. It presents some pleasing scenery, and consists of 3230 acres, about two-thirds pasture land, the remainder producing wheat, beans, barley, seeds, and great quantities of fruit. Besides the village of Severn-Stoke, are the small villages of Kinnersley, Sandford, and Clifton; and among the many respectable houses is Severn-Bank, the fine seat of the Earl of Coventry. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 17. 4.; net income, £746; patron, the Earl of Coventry. The church, situated on the south-west side of the village, is an ancient edifice with a tower. A market and a fair were granted by Edward II., but both of them have been long disused.

Stoke, South (St. Andrew and St. Mary)

STOKE, SOUTH (St. Andrew and St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Winnibriggs and Threo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Colsterworth; containing, with the township of North Stoke, and the hamlet of Easton, 456 inhabitants, of whom 159 are in South Stoke township. This place, which, from the discovery of coins and other relics of the Romans, is supposed to have been in the occupation of that people, has for the last two or three centuries been the property of the Tumor family, one of whom, Edmund Tumor, was knighted in 1663 as a reward for his loyalty to Charles I. The parish is sometimes called Stoke-Rochford, from the family of Rochford, who were anciently proprietors of the lordship. It comprises about 4700 acres; the soil in the higher grounds is loam, and in the lower clay, incumbent on limestone. The river Witham runs through the district; and the scenery is enlivened by the seat of Christopher Tumor, Esq., a splendid mansion in the Elizabethan style, situated in a park of 400 acres displaying much varied beauty. The living is a rectory, formerly in medieties, which were united in 1776, valued jointly in the king's books at £18. 15.; net income, £685; patron, the Prebendary of South Grantham in the Cathedral of Salisbury. An allotment of about 610 acres of land was made in 1800, in lieu of the tithes for the townships of South Stoke and Easton. The church is a spacious and handsome structure, containing monuments to the Rochford family, by whom it was partly built 3 to the Cholmeley family, of Easton; and the Tumors, of Stoke. The edifice has recently been restored at a cost of £2000, defrayed by Mr. Tumor, Sir M. T. Cholmeley, and other gentlemen. An almshouse was founded in 1677 by Sir Edmund Tumor, who endowed it for six persons; and the poor have the dividends on £1608 three per cents, left by the Rev. W. Dodwell.

Stoke, South (St. Andrew)

STOKE, SOUTH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Wallingford, hundred of Dorchester, county of Oxford, 4¼ miles (S. by W.) from Wallingford; containing, with the liberty of Woodcote, 907 inhabitants, of whom 405 are in South Stoke township. The Great Western railway passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 0½.; net income, £136; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. At Woodcote is a chapel of ease, dedicated to St. Leonard. There is a place of worship for Independents. Ten children are taught for £18 a year, arising from a bequest in 1659 by the Rev. Griffith Higgs, D.D., who also left £100, which have been invested in land for the poor.

Stoke, South (St. James)

STOKE, SOUTH (St. James), a parish, in the union of Bath, hundred of Bath-Forum, E. division of Somerset, 2½ miles (S. by W.) from Bath; containing 330 inhabitants. It comprises 800 acres by computation; the soil is thin, with a substratum of stone, of which there are several quarries. The river Avon and the Radford canal run through the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 9, and in the patronage of the Rev. H. Blayds: the tithes have been commuted for £165, and there is a glebe of 15 acres.

Stoke, South

STOKE, SOUTH, a parish, in the hundred of Avisford, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 2¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Arundel; containing 102 inhabitants. It comprises 1286a. 1r. 13p., including part of Arundel Park. The river Arun runs along the northern and eastern boundaries, and a cut was made across a narrow neck of land near the church in 1840, for the purpose of shortening the navigation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 15. 10; net income, £162; patron, the Earl of Albemarle. On the downs are some ancient earthworks.

Stoke-Talmage (St. Mary Magdalene)

STOKE-TALMAGE (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Thame, hundred of Pirton, county of Oxford, 2 miles (S. S. W.) from Tetsworth; containing 101 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 844 acres, of which 252 are arable, 580 pasture, and 12 wood; the low lands are indifferent pasture, and the high grounds form good strong corn land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £ 12.17.1.; net income, £248; patron, the Earl of Macclesfield. The tithes were partly exchanged for land and corn-rents in 1811, and a commutation has taken place recently for a rent-charge of £53; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 16¾ acres.

Stoke-Trister

STOKE-TRISTER, a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Norton-Ferris, E. division of Somerset, 2 miles (E.) from Wincanton; containing 436 inhabitants. A few persons are employed in the manufacture of dowlas and ticking. The living is a discharged rectory, united to the living of Cucklington, and valued in the king's books at £7. 15. 2½.

Stoke-Under-Hamdon (St. Denis)

STOKE-UNDER-HAMDON (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Tintinhull, W. division of Somerset, 5¾ miles (w. by N.) from Yeovil; containing 1367 inhabitants. It comprises 1366 acres by admeasurement, exclusive of Hamdon Hill. The soil is rich, bearing grain and green crops in abundance; about 700 acres are arable, 350 pasture, 100 in orchards, and 30 wood. The surface is marked by gentle undulations, and the scenery agreeably interspersed with elm and other trees. There is a considerable manufacture of gloves. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 2½.; net income, £89; patrons and impropriators, the family of Hawkesworth. The church is a very ancient edifice in the early English style, containing 350 sittings. A free chapel or chantry, for a provost and four priests, in honour of St. Nicholas, was founded in 1304, by Sir John Beauchamp, Knt., in a castle here. In the time of Leland, there were extensive remains of this castle near the village; as also many old monuments, statues, &c., in the chapel.

Stoke-upon-Terne (St. Peter)

STOKE-UPON-TERNE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Drayton, Drayton division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop; containing, with the townships of Eaton, Ollerton, and Westanswick, 1000 inhabitants, of whom 528 are in Stoke township, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from Drayton. The parish comprises 5000 acres of good land, the soil consisting of sand, gravel, and clay: the river Terne runs along the western boundary. The ancient manor-house of the Corbets has been demolished, and a farmhouse erected on its site. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the gift of the Rev. H. C. Cotton: the tithes have been commuted for £939; there is a glebehouse, and the glebe comprises 50 acres. The church contains a handsome monument of alabaster to the memory of Sir Reginald Corbet, a judge of the common pleas in the reign of Elizabeth.

Stoke-upon-Trent (St. Peter ad Vincula)

STOKE-UPON-TRENT (St. Peter ad Vincula), a newly-enfranchised borough, market-town, and parish, forming a union of itself, in the N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 1¾ mile (E.) from Newcastle-under-Lyme, and 150 miles (N. W. by N.) from London; the parish containing 48,055 inhabitants. This important parish includes the district parishes of Bucknall, Longton, and Shelton, the town of Hanley, the chapelry of Lane-End, and the townships of Boothen, Botteslow, Clayton, FentonCulvert, Fenton-Vivian, Penkhull, and Seabridge. It comprises about two-thirds of the populous district called the Potteries, and the town, in common with various others in the parish and in this part of the county, is indebted for its increase and importance to the numerous potteries established in the neighbourhood. Stoke is situated on the river Trent, is amply supplied with water, and, with the adjoining townships of Fenton and Longton, is lighted with gas from works erected by subscription on the bank of the Trent and Mersey canal. Very considerable improvements have taken place within the last few years; many good houses have been built, and new streets formed opening into the glebe and other lands. A spacious and elegant stone building, also, has been erected for a town-hall, of which the first stone was laid in September 1834, by the late John Tomlinson, Esq., of Cliff Ville, chairman of the subscribers to the undertaking. An act for establishing a market was passed in 1845. The principal manufactures are of china and earthenware in all their various branches, for which there are several very extensive establishments; the largest are those of Messrs. Copeland and Garrett, Messrs. Minton and Hollins, and Messrs. William Adams and Sons. The Trent and Mersey canal, and a branch from it to Newcastle, pass through the town, affording great facility of communication; and on their banks are numerous wharfs, warehouses, mills, and other buildings. In connexion with the canal is a tramroad to Longton, for the conveyance of goods. An act was passed in 1846 for a railway from Macclesfield, through the district of the Potteries, to Colwich, on the Trent-Valley line. By the act 2nd of William IV., cap. 45, this town, with others in the Potteries, was constituted a borough, with the privilege of sending two members to parliament: the right of election is vested in the £10 householders of a district comprising 7084 acres: the returning officer is appointed by the sheriff. In 1839, an act was obtained for establishing an effective police in Stoke, Fenton, Longton, and Trentham, and for improving and cleansing the streets; commissioners with certain qualifications are appointed for carrying the act into operation, and out of their body a chief bailiff is appointed.

The rectory of Stoke was originally much more extensive; it has at different times been subdivided, and parts of it formed into distinct parishes and rectories. In the year 1807 an act was passed for separating from it the chapelries of Newcastle, Burslem, Whitmore, Bucknall with Bagnall, and Norton-on-the-Moors, which are now distinct rectories, though Bucknall and Bagnall still form part of this parish for civil purposes. In 1827, the late Mr. Tomlinson, the patron, procured an act of parliament authorising the sale, to the respective landowners, of all tithes and dues belonging to the rectory, and for the endowment of two new churches, at Shelton and Longton. The living of Stoke is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £41. 0. 10.; net. income, £2717. The old church is supposed to have been built before the Conquest, and is mentioned in the Taxation of Pope Nicholas in 1291, with its chapels annexed, and valued at 60 marks. Being not only too small for the increased population, but also in a state of decay, it was taken down, and in 1826 a new church was erected near its site, at an expense of more than £14,000, of which the greater part was raised by subscription, £3300 were given by Dr. Woodhouse, the rector, and the remainder was obtained by the sale of pews, and by parochial rates. It is a handsome structure in the later English style: the east window, presented by Dr. Woodhouse, is a fine specimen of stained glass, after the antique, containing fifteen well-executed figures of the Apostles and Evangelists; and in four side windows are the arms of the bishop, archdeacon, rector, and patron, and of some of the principal contributors. In the chancel are several monuments of statuary marble by eminent sculptors; those of the late Josiah Wedgwood, Esq., of Etruria, and Mrs. Wedgwood, were removed from the old church. The churchyard contains nearly five acres, and is fenced with a stone-wall and iron-railing. The parsonagehouse, at a small distance from the church, has been enlarged and modernised from the funds of the rectory. The other incumbencies in the parish are those at Bucknall, Edensor, Etruria, Fenton, Hanley, Hartshill, Hope, Lane-End, Longton, Northwood, Penkhull, Shelton, Trent-Vale, and Wellington. In the town are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Methodists of the New Connexion; and a national school supported by subscription, and by an allotment of one-third of the proceeds arising from Dr. Woodhouse's permanent endowment. Dr. John Lightfoot, the eminent Hebrew scholar, was born in the rectory-house, in 1602.

Stoke-Wake (All Saints)

STOKE-WAKE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Sturminster, hundred of Whiteway, Sturminster division of Dorset, 10 miles (W.) from Blandford; containing 156 inhabitants. It comprises 1021 acres, of which 141 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 8. 9., and in the gift of H. Ker Seymer, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £170, and the glebe contains 13f acres.

Stoke, West

STOKE, WEST, a parish, in the union of West Hampnett, hundred of Bosham, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 3½ miles (N. W.) from Chichester; containing 98 inhabitants. It is conjectured that this was the scene of the dreadful slaughter of the Danes by the men of Chichester, about the year 900. The parish includes the picturesque valley of Kingley Bottom, where is a grove of yew-trees of great size and luxuriance. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 11., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £170. The church, which is beautifully situated in Stoke Park, is in the early English style, and contains a handsome monument to the Stoughton family.