Stoven - Stowick

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

234-238

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'Stoven - Stowick', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 234-238. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51311 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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Stoven (St. Margaret)

STOVEN (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N. W.) from Wangford; containing 127 inhabitants. It comprises 793a. 3r. 39p., of which 30 acres are common or waste. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £63; patron, incumbent, and impropriator, the Rev. G. O. Leman: the tithes have been commuted for £200. The church, which is chiefly early English, contains two Norman arches of great beauty.

Stow

STOW, a hamlet, in the parish of Threckingham, union of Sleaford, wapentake of Aveland, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Falkingham; containing 34 inhabitants.

Stow (St. Mary)

STOW (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 8 miles (S. E.) from Gainsborough; containing, with the townships of Bransby, Normanby, and Sturton, 943 inhabitants, of whom 418 are in Stow township. This place is generally supposed to have been the Sidnacester of the Romans, and the seat of a Saxon bishopric from about 678 to 959. The ancient Watlingstreet passes near. A nunnery was founded by Godiva, wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, who also, with her husband, greatly augmented the revenue of Stow church, which had been built and endowed for secular priests by Eadnorth, Bishop of Dorchester. These religious, after the Conquest, became Benedictine monks, under the government of an abbot, and Bishop Remigius obtained for them, from William Rufus, the then desolate abbey of Eynsham, in Oxfordshire, where they soon settled. King Henry III. passed the night at Stow, previously to his engagement, under the walls of Lincoln Castle, with the forces of Louis and the turbulent barons. The parish comprises 4737a. 3r. 11p., and is intersected by the middle road from Lincoln to Gainsborough. A fair for horses is held on the 10th of October. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £102, with a house; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The tithes have been commuted for £936. The church is a spacious and massive structure, principally in the Norman style, with a central tower; the south and west sides of the nave have each a highly-ornamented doorway, and the chancel contains some fine details, especially in the mouldings of the arches. There is a meeting-house for Wesleyans. A school is endowed with £12 per annum.

Stow (St. Michael)

STOW (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Knighton, hundred of Purslow, S. division of Salop, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Knighton; containing 185 inhabitants. It comprises 2693 acres, of which 1350 are common or waste land. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 7. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £204 payable to the vicar, and £48 to the warden of Gun hospital.

Stow-Bardolph (Holy Trinity)

STOW-BARDOLPH (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (N. N. E.) from Downham; containing 1076 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road to Lynn, and is intersected by the greater river Ouse, comprises 6041a. 3r. 1p., whereof 5152 acres are arable, 778 pasture and meadow, and 111 wood. The lands are the property of Sir Thomas Hare, Bart., whose seat, Stow Hall, is a handsome mansion finely situated. About two miles from the village is a bridge over the river, in the immediate neighbourhood of which a considerable village has recently arisen, where a fair for horses and cows is held on the eve of the festival of the Holy Trinity. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the rectory of Wimbotsham annexed, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 8., and in the patronage of Sir T. Hare, who is impropriator of Stow-Bardolph. The great tithes of the parish, with some exception, have been commuted for £350, and the vicarial tithes for £158; there is a glebe of 20 acres, with a house. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower; on the north side of the chancel is the mausoleum of the Hare family, in which are many splendid monuments. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; also six almshouses for widows erected in 1603 by Sir Ralph Hare, who in 1622 endowed them with 80 acres of land now producing £80 per annum. To the south of the church are the remains of an ancient hermitage of brick and flint, now part of a farmhouse.

Stow-Bedon (St. Botolph)

STOW-BEDON (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wayland, W. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Watton; containing 300 inhabitants. It comprises about 1700 acres; the surface is boldly undulated, and the lower grounds are watered by a small rivulet. Stow-Bedon Hall, a mansion formerly of some importance, is now a farmhouse. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £4. 19. 4½ net income, £295; patron, the Rev. E. Goddard: the glebe comprises 10 acres. The church was anciently appropriated to Marham Abbey, and had a guild in honour of the Virgin Mary. It is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles; the tower fell down in 1797, and has not been rebuilt: the font is large, and beautifully sculptured. In the churchyard are three coffin-shaped tombs, with crosses fleuri. At the inclosure of the parish, 30 acres were allotted to the poor for fuel.

Stow cum Quy (St. Mary)

STOW cum Quy (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Staine, county of Cambridge, 5 miles (N. E.) from Cambridge; containing 445 inhabitants. It comprises 1918a. 2r. 29p., of which 1469 acres are arable, 364 pasture, 37 wood, and the remainder common, roads, &c. An act was passed in 1839, for inclosing certain waste lands, when 4 acres were appropriated for recreation. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £52; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Ely. The tithes have been commuted for £530, and the glebe comprises 64½ acres. Jeremy Collier, the celebrated nonjuring divine, was born here in 1650.

Stow-Langtoft (St. George)

STOW-LANGTOFT (St. George), a parish, in the union of Stow, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (S. E.) from Ixworth; containing 183 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 1304 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 7. 8½.; net income, £307; patron, H. Wilson, Esq. There is a glebe of 63 acres, with an excellent rectory-house built in 1833 by the Rev. Samuel Rickards, assisted by the patron. The church is in the decorated and later English styles; the chancel contains several richly-carved stalls and handsome monuments to members of the family of D'Ewes. The church and parsonage-house stand upon the site of a Roman encampment, and numerous coins have been discovered at different times. Sir Symonds D'Ewes, Bart., the eminent antiquary, lived in the Hall, now the residence of Mr. Wilson, proprietor of the parish. Tillemans, the Dutch painter, was buried in the church.

Stow, Long

STOW, LONG, a parish, in the union of Caxton and Arrington, hundred of Longstow, county of Cambridge, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Caxton; containing 276 inhabitants. It is situated on the old north road, and comprises 1400 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 8. 4.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. H. A. Bishop. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1798; the glebe-house was rebuilt in 1840, by the incumbent, and the glebe altogether contains 406 acres. An hospital for poor sisters was founded here, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, in the reign of Henry III., by Walter, then vicar. Fossil remains abound in the neighbourhood, consisting principally of ammonites and bones of large animals.

Stow, Long (St. Botolph)

STOW, LONG (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Leightonstone, county of Huntingdon, 2½ miles (N. by E.) from Kimbolton; containing, with the chapelry of Little Catworth, 263 inhabitants, of whom 188 are in the hamlet of Long Stow. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Ely, with a net income of £70. The tithes, payable to the governors of Queen Anne's Bounty, have been commuted for £143. 6. 8.; the governors have also 191 acres of glebe.

Stow-Maries (St. Mary and St. Margaret)

STOW-MARIES (St. Mary and St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 7 miles (S. by W.) from Maldon; containing 257 inhabitants. This parish takes the adjunct to its name from the family of Marey, to whom the lands at one time belonged. It is situated on the river Crouch, and comprises by admeasurement 2466 acres, whereof 1755 are arable, 99 pasture, 155 meadow, and 82 wood. A fair is held on the 24th of June. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Rev. T. H. Storie: the tithes have been commuted for £660; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 40 acres. The church is ancient.

Stow-Market (St. Peter and St. Mary)

STOW-MARKET (St. Peter and St. Mary), a market-town and parish, and the head of the union of Stow, in the hundred of Stow, W. division of Suffolk, 75 miles (N. E.) from London; containing, with the chapelry of Gipping, 3136 inhabitants. This place is very ancient, and at the time of the Norman survey was called Thorna or Thorne Market, the former term being derived from the Saxon divinity Thor, and ea, water, in allusion to the adjoining river. It was afterwards named Stow-Market, from its being the market for the hundred of Stow. Two churches are mentioned in Domesday book as existing here. The town is the most central in the county, and is situated at the confluence of three rivulets which form the river Gipping, on the road from Ipswich to Bury and Cambridge. It consists of several streets, for the most part regularly built, and lighted with gas; many of the houses are handsome, and the inhabitants are supplied with water from land springs and wells. The commercial interests of the town are essentially promoted by its locality, and have been much improved by the Gipping being made navigable to Ipswich, under an act obtained in 1790. From the basin extends a pleasant walk, about a mile in length, passing through the extensive hop plantations in the neighbourhood. The trade consists chiefly in the making of malt, for which there are more than twenty houses, and which is rapidly increasing; corn, malt, and flour are largely exported to London, Hull, Liverpool, and other places. A brewery has been established, and there are small manufactories for rope, twine, and sacking; a patent saw-mill; and three iron-foundries, one of which is also used for making agricultural implements. By means of the navigation to Ipswich, timber, deals, coal, iron, salt, oil-cake, and slate, are brought for the supply of the central parts of the county. Here is a station of the Ipswich and Bury railway, 12 miles from Ipswich, and 15 from Bury; and an act was passed in 1846 for a branch from this railway hence, to Diss and Norwich, 31 miles long. The market is on Thursday, and is for corn, cattle, and provisions: a building for a corn-exchange and readingroom, which is also used on public occasions, has been erected at a cost of £3000, raised by shares of £25 each. A fair is held on August. 12th, chiefly for lambs; and on July 10th is a pleasure-fair. The county meetings are held in the town; and the magistrates hold a petty-session every alternate Monday. The powers of the county debt-court of Stow-Market, established in 1847, extend over part of the registration-district of Stow.

The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Stow-Upland annexed, valued in the king's books at £16. 15.; patron, incumbent, and impropriator, the Rev. A. G. Harper Hollingsworth. The great tithes of Stow-Market have been commuted for £89, and the vicarial for £185; the glebe contains 6 acres, with a house, in the grounds of which is a fine mulberry-tree planted by the poet Milton, while on a visit to Dr. Young, the vicar. The church was rebuilt about the year 1300 by the monks of St. Osyth, Essex, who then held the advowson; it was enlarged in 1838, and is a spacious and handsome structure in the centre of the town, partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style. The building consists of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a square embattled tower, surmounted by a slender wooden spire of tasteful appearance, 120 feet in height, which was erected from the proceeds of a legacy left in the reign of Anne. At the east end of the south aisle is the Tyrell chapel, separated by a carved screen, and containing interesting monuments to that family. There are places of worship for Baptists and Independents; and several benevolent institutions for the relief of the poor, who also receive about £260 per annum from bequests made at different periods. The union of Stow comprises 34 parishes or places, and contains a population of 19,675. In a stone-pit near the entrance to the town, the tusks and bones of a species of elephant have been found. A spring in the parish is slightly impregnated with iron. Dr. Young, tutor to the poet Milton, and master of Jesus College, Cambridge, was vicar of the parish from 1630 to 1655, and was interred here.

Stow-On-The-Wold (St. Edward)

STOW-ON-THE-WOLD (St. Edward), a markettown and parish, and the head of a union, in the Upper division of the hundred of Slaughter, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 25 miles (E. by N.) from Gloucester, and 82 (W. N. W.) from London; containing, with the hamlets of Donnington and Mangersbury, 2140 inhabitants, of whom 1465 are in the town. This place, in old records denominated Stow St. Edward, was the scene of a battle between the royalists and the parliamentary forces in the great civil war, when the former were put to flight. The town is situated on the summit of a steep elevation. The houses in general are of stone, but low, irregularly built, and of ancient appearance; and being indifferently supplied with fuel and water, and having no common field attached, the place is vulgarly remarked to have only one of the four elements, namely, air. A charter for a market was procured in the reign of Edward III., by the abbot of Evesham, then lord of the manor; it is on Thursday, and fairs are held on May 12th and October 24th, for the sale of hops, cheese, and sheep, of which last 20,000 are said to have been sold at one fair. The inhabitants were incorporated by Henry VI., but at present the town is governed by two bailiffs, who are appointed annually at the manorial court leet. The powers of the county debt-court of Stow, established in 1847, extend over the registrationdistrict of Stow. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18; net income, £525; patron, the family of Hippisley: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1765. The church is a spacious edifice in the ancient English style, erected at different periods in the 14th and 15th centuries; the tower is conspicuous at a great distance. There is a place of worship for Baptists; also a school endowed with £13. 9. per annum for teaching Latin. An almshouse for nine persons, on the south side of the churchyard, was founded in the sixteenth of Edward IV., under the will of William Chestre; and subsequent endowments have been given for the maintenance of its inmates. The poor-law union comprises 28 parishes or places, 25 of which are in the county of Gloucester, and 3 in that of Worcester; the whole containing a population of 9522. A park, house, and garden, named St. Margaret's Chapel, at a place called Merke, in the parish, constituted part of the estates of Charles I. and his queen. The Fosse-way intersects the northern part of the parish.

Stow-Upland (St. Mary)

STOW-UPLAND (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Stow, W. division of Suffolk; adjoining Stow-Market, and containing 903 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to that of Stow-Market. The great tithes have been commuted for £257, and the vicarial for £175; the impropriate glebe contains 29 acres. A church has been erected by subscription: it is dedicated to the Trinity; and the living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Vicar, with a net income of £100.

Stow, West (St. Mary)

STOW, WEST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thingoe, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 279 inhabitants. It is situated on the right bank of the river Lark, and consists of 2926a. 3r. 36p. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Wordwell united, valued in the king's books at £9. 17. 3½., and in the gift of R. B. de Beauvoir, Esq.: the tithes of the parish have been commuted for £191, and the glebe comprises 29¾ acres. The church contains numerous memorials of the ancient family of Croft. The remains of the Hall convey some idea of its former magnificence; the gateway entrance is a fine specimen of brick-work of the time of Henry VIII. The Rev. John Boys, one of the learned divines employed in the translation of the Bible, was rector of West Stow.

Stow-Wood

STOW-WOOD, a parish, in the union of Headington, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford, 4 miles (N. E.) from Oxford; containing 33 inhabitants, who attend the adjoining parochial church of Beckley.

Stowe (St. Mary)

STOWE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Buckingham, 2½ miles (N. N. W.) from Buckingham; containing, with the hamlets of Boycutt, Dadford, and Lamport, 410 inhabitants. This place is celebrated for the princely mansion of the Duke of Buckingham, which was visited by Her Majesty and Prince Albert in January 1845. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11.14.7.; net income, £95; patron and impropriator, his Grace. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school, in which 50 children of both sexes are educated and clothed, at the expense of the Duchess of Buckingham. Hammond, the elegiac poet, died whilst on a visit here, in 1742.

Stowe (St. John the Baptist)

STOWE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Stamford, wapentake of Ness, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (E. N. E.) from Stamford; containing 11 inhabitants, and comprising 400 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, united in 1772 to that of Barholme, and valued in the king's books at £4. 3. 9. A school held from time immemorial in the court-house of the manor, is endowed with £12 per annum, the bequest of Edward Burgh.

Stowe (St. John the Baptist)

STOWE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, union, and N. division of the county, of Stafford, 7 miles (N. E. by E.) from Stafford; containing, with the townships of Amerton and Grindley, and part of the townships of Drointon, Great and Little Haywood, and Hixon, 1267 inhabitants, of whom 156 are in Stowe township. The parish comprises 5008a. 2r. 31p. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £61; patron, Sir John Cave, Bart.; impropriator, John Fitzgerald, Esq. The church is an ancient building, the nave of which is separated from the chancel by a handsome arch, said to be Saxon; it contains an alabaster monument to Devereux, first Viscount Hereford, and his two wives, with their effigies in a recumbent posture. The viscount, who distinguished himself in the wars against France in the reign of Henry VIII., resided and was buried here. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Stowe-Nine-Churches (St. Michael)

STOWE-NINE-CHURCHES (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Daventry, hundred of Fawsley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Weedon 3 containing 392 inhabitants. This place, which is a short distance to the west of the road from London to Holyhead, obtained the adjunct to its name from the circumstance of the manor having nine advowsons appended to it in the reign of Henry VII. It was for some time in the possession of Sir John Danvers, a principal parliamentary leader, and one of those who signed the warrant for the execution of Charles I. The parish comprises about 2000 acres, which, exclusively of 100 of woodland, are about equally divided between arable and pasture: the Grand Junction canal and the London and Birmingham railway pass through it, the latter by a tunnel 418 yards in length. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18, and in the gift of the Rev. J. L. Crawley: the tithes of the incumbent have been commuted for £500, and £133 are paid to the Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy; the glebe contains 85 acres. The church is situated on the brow of a steep acclivity; it is a very ancient edifice, partly in the Norman style, and contains a sumptuous monument to the memory of Elizabeth, fourth daughter of John, Lord Latimer. The Roman Watling-street forms the boundary of the parish.

Stowell (St. Leonard)

STOWELL (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Northleach; containing 42 inhabitants, and comprising 800 acres. The river Colne washes the extremity of the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed in 1660 to that of Hampnett, and valued in the king's books at £5. 17. 1. Sir William Scott, late judge of the court of admiralty, was created Baron Stowell, of Stowell Park, in 1821; the title is now extinct.

Stowell (St. Mary Magdalene)

STOWELL (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Horethorne, E. division of Somerset, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Wincanton; containing 117 inhabitants, and consisting of 903 acres by admeasurement. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 15., and in the gift of W. M. Dodington, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £169, and the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church was rebuilt in 1834.

Stowell, Wilts.—See Alton-Priors.

STOWELL, Wilts. —See Alton-Priors.

Stower, East (St. Mary)

STOWER, EAST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Shaftesbury, hundred of Redlane, Shaston division of Dorset, 4¼ miles (W.) from Shaftesbury; containing 554 inhabitants. The living is annexed, with the livings of Motcomb and West Stower, to the vicarage of Gillingham: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £146, and the vicarial for £273. The church, rebuilt in 1841, is a cruciform structure in the Norman style, with a tower at the intersection, and contains accommodation for 400 persons. Fielding, the novelist, resided for some time on his estate in the parish.

Stower-Provost (St. Michael)

STOWER-PROVOST (St. Michael), a parish and liberty, in the union of Shaftesbury, Shaston division of the county of Dorset, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Shaftesbury; containing 892 inhabitants. It comprises about 2700 acres, 500 of which are arable, 200 woodland, and the rest pasture. The living is a rectory, with that of Todbere annexed in 1746, valued in the king's books at £16. 4. 9½.; net income, £655; patrons, the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. The church contains 300 sittings. In the reign of William the Conqueror, a cell to the nunnery of St. Leger de Pratellis or Preaux, in Normandy, was founded here, which at the suppression was granted to Eton College, and then to King's College.

Stower, West (St. Mary)

STOWER, WEST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Shaftesbury, hundred of Redlane, Shaston division of the county of Dorset, 5¼ miles (W.) from Shaftesbury; containing 237 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Gillingham: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £92, and those of the incumbent for £183. William Watson, M.D., author of some theological productions, was a native of this place, where he practised as a quack, though he had regularly graduated as a physician, and was distinguished for knowledge of his profession.

Stowerton

STOWERTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Whichford, union of Shipston-upon-Stour, Brails division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (S. E.) from Shipston; containing 189 inhabitants, and comprising 950 acres.

Stowey (St. Mary)

STOWEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Clutton, hundred of Chew, E. division of Somerset, 3½ miles (S. S. W.) from Pensford; containing 188 inhabitants. Stowey Mead, a cottage residence of the late Lord Mount-Sandford's, and Stowey House, the property of William Jones Burdett, Esq., to the latter of whom nearly all the parish belongs, are both very pleasantly situated. The village is much admired, and is enlivened by a stream of water which is said to be efficacious in lithontriptic complaints. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £6.12., and in the gift of the Bishop of Bath and Wells: the tithes have been commuted for £163.10.; the glebe contains 35½ acres. Richard Jones, Esq., in 1692 bequeathed £3000 for charitable uses in different parishes, part of which is applied to the instruction of children and the relief of the poor in this parish; and Mrs. Mary Jones, in 1787, left £1500, the interest of £500 of which she directed to be distributed among the poor of Stowey. Robert Parsons, the celebrated Jesuit, was born here, of humble parents.

Stowey, Nether (St. Mary)

STOWEY, NETHER (St. Mary), a small markettown and a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 8 miles (W. N. W.) from Bridgwater, and 147 (W. by S.) from London; containing 787 inhabitants. This place, which is situated on a stream tributary to the river Parret, consists of three streets diverging obliquely from the market-place, and is neat and well built. At the western extremity is a hill said to have been the site of an ancient castle, but nothing more than a circular earthwork now remains; it commands a fine view of the Channel, with the Mendip hills, and the surrounding country, which is agreeably diversified. The manufacture of silk is carried on to a limited extent. The market is on Saturday, but, from its proximity to Bridgwater, very little business is transacted; the market-house is a rude building. A fair for cattle takes place on September 18th; and a court leet and baron is held at Michaelmas, when constables and other officers are appointed. The living is a vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £5. 2. 8½,; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Windsor. The tithes have been commuted for £300; there is a glebe-house, built by the present incumbent, and the glebe contains 50 acres. The church is situated at the entrance into the town from Bridgwater. Here is a place of worship for Independents. Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the gifted poet and moral philosopher, resided at the close of the last century at Nether Stowey, where he first became acquainted with Wordsworth.

Stowey, Over (St. Mary Magdalene)

STOWEY, OVER (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of Cannington, W. division of Somerset, 1 mile (S. S. W.) from Nether Stowey; containing 568 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3647a. 3r. 35p. Greywacke stone is abundant, and red-sandstone is found, with detached portions of limestone. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with part of the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £7. 1. 5½., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Bath and Wells; impropriators, the Corporation of Bristol. The great tithes have been commuted for £130, and the incumbent's for £165; the rectorial lands comprehend 65½ acres, and the vicarial 1½ acre. The church is a neat building, lately beautified.

Stowford

STOWFORD, a parish, in the union of Tavistock, hundred of Lifton, Lifton and S. divisions of the county of Devon, 8 miles (E. by N.) from Launceston; containing 647 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 12. 6., and in the gift of the Rev. John Wollocombe: the tithes have been commuted for £240, and the glebe comprises 50 acres. The church contains a monument with marble statues of Christopher Harris, Esq., in the ancient Roman costume, and his wife Mary. Margaret Doyle, in 1777, bequeathed the interest of £200 for teaching children. On the north side of the road to Exeter are the remains of a circular encampment. Dr. John Prideaux, a learned divine, was born here in 1578.

Stowick

STOWICK, a tything, in the parish of Henbury, union of Clifton, Lower division of the hundred of Henbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 552 inhabitants.