Sutcombe - Sutton-at-Hone

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

271-274

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'Sutcombe - Sutton-at-Hone', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 271-274. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51319 Date accessed: 22 July 2014.


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Sutcombe (St. Andrew)

SUTCOMBE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Holsworthy, hundred of Black Torrington, Holsworthy and N. divisions of Devon, 5 miles (N. by E.) from Holsworthy; containing 523 inhabitants. It comprises about 3000 acres, the greater portion of which is arable, 50 acres in wood, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the soil is chiefly clay, and the lands in many parts swampy. A branch of the Launceston canal passes through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 10. 7½., and in the patronage of the Rev. W. Cohern: the tithes have been commuted for £300, and there are 51 acres of glebe. The church has a Norman doorway, but is mostly of later date; and contains some neat monuments to the family of Davie. An almshouse for six persons was founded and endowed by Sir William Morris, secretary of state to Charles II.

Sutterby (St. John the Baptist)

SUTTERBY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Wold division of the wapentake of Candleshoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Spilsby; containing 44 inhabitants. It comprises 465 acres; the soil is chalky, the surface hilly, and there are some quarries of limestone, which is worked for burning into lime. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 2½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £120, and the glebe comprises about 15 acres. The church is an ancient structure.

Sutterton (St. Mary)

SUTTERTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Boston, wapentake of Kirton, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from Boston; containing 1303 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £23. 3. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £885. The tithes were commuted for land in 1772; the glebe comprises nearly 500 acres. The church is principally in the later English style, with a tower surmounted by a spire, and is extremly interesting from its elegant details in the various styles of architecture, from the early Norman to the later English. There is a place of worship for Baptists. The poor's estate, arising from bequests, amounts to £162 per annum.

Sutton (All Saints)

SUTTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Biggleswade, county of Bedford, 1¾ mile (S.) from Potton; containing 415 inhabitants. It comprises upwards of 2000 acres; the soil is sandy, and the surface varied. The parish was the seat and royalty of the celebrated John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, who conferred Sutton and Potton upon Sir Roger Burgoyne and his heirs, by a curious laconic deed in doggerel verse, which is preserved among the ancient records in the Arches, Doctors' Commons. The manor-house was burnt down in 1826. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the patronage of St. John's College, Oxford, with a net income of £362: the tithes have been commuted for £10, and there are 32 acres of glebe, with a house, near which is a fine chalybeate spring. The learned Bishop Stillingfleet was rector of Sutton, and here wrote his Origines Sacræ.

Sutton (St. Andrew)

SUTTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the hundred of South Witchford, union and Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge, 6 miles (W. by S.) from Ely; containing 1599 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 6329 acres, of which 2000 are arable, 3296 meadow and pasture, and 1033 common and waste now inclosed. It had anciently a market and a fair, granted to the first abbot of Ely. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Ely. The great tithes have been commuted for £450, and the vicarial for £1175; the appropriate glebe comprises 72 acres, and the vicarial 45. The church, built by Barnet, Bishop of Ely, who died in 1373, is a beautiful specimen of the decorated English style. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; also a school endowed with £15 per annum. In 1634, some labourers discovered several ancient coins and gold rings, and three silver plates, one of which bore a curious inscription.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish and union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 2 miles (N. E. by E.) from Frodsham; containing 275 inhabitants. It comprises 1147 acres; the prevailing soil is clay.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the union and parochial chapelry of Macclesfield, parish of Prestbury, N. division of the county of Chester; adjoining the town of Macclesfield, and containing, in 1841, 7035 inhabitants. The township comprises 4533 acres, chiefly consisting of pasture land, there being very little wood or arable; the surface is hill and dale, with a few plantations of Scotch larch and fir. Some stone-quarries are worked. Here are several silk and cotton manufactories, some tape and small ware, and trimming factories, and some dye-works; the first manufactory was established about sixty years ago, and the whole of the works are supposed to employ from ten to eleven thousand hands. The mass of the buildings in the township are within the borough, and adjoin the town, of Macclesfield; the other buildings are dispersed, and consist chiefly of farmhouses and residences, some of the manufactories and dye-works being also in the rural portion. The Macclesfield and Leek road and the Macclesfield canal intersect the township. A district church dedicated to St. George was consecrated in 1834: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Trustees; net income, £225. There is also a chapel dedicated to St. James, in the gift of Trustees; and the Wesleyans have two places of worship. The family of Holinshed, the historian, had a seat in the township, which is supposed to have been his birthplace. The union workhouse is situated here.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish of Middlewich, union and hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 1¼ mile (S.) from Middlewich; containing 38 inhabitants, and comprising 191 acres of land, the soil of which is partly clay and partly sand.

Sutton (St. Mary)

SUTTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Chesterfield; containing, with the merged parish of Duckmanton, 628 inhabitants. Nicholas Deincourt, Earl of Scarsdale, in 1643 fortified a Hall which he had previously erected here, but it was taken by assault, and the works demolished, by Sir John Gell, and some time afterwards, it was plundered by the parliamentarian garrison of Bolsover: the mansion is situated in an extensive and beautiful park. The parish comprises 4303 acres, of a strong soil, and of hilly surface, the substratum abounding in ironstone and coal, both of which are wrought. At Duckmanton is a small foundry called the Adelphi Ironworks. The living is a discharged rectory, with the vicarage of Duckmanton annexed, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 0½., and in the gift of the family of Arkwright, the impropriators of Duckmanton: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £300; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe comprises 58 acres. The church was erected about the end of the 13th century: the windows exhibit some remains of ancient stained glass. Duckmanton church, now demolished, was dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul. Eighteen children of the parish are instructed for about £20 per annum, arising from land.

Sutton

SUTTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Gussage St. Michael, poor-law union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Badbury, county of Dorset; containing 82 inhabitants.

Sutton

SUTTON, a parish, in the union and hundred of Rochford, S. division of Essex, 1 mile (S. E. by S.) from Rochford; containing 120 inhabitants. The parish derives its name, originally South-town, from its position with respect to Rochford. It comprises about 511 acres of arable land, and 124 of pasture, besides which there is a considerable portion called saltings. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11, and in the gift of J. Aitkin, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £270, and the glebe comprises 10 acres. The church is a small ancient edifice with a stone tower.

Sutton (St. Michael)

SUTTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the hundred of Broxash, union and county of Hereford, 4¼ miles (N. N. E.) from the city of Hereford; containing 102 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income £64; patrons and impropriators, the Rev. T. Allen and H. Unett, Esq.

Sutton (St. Nicholas)

SUTTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the hundred of Broxash, union and county of Hereford, 4¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Hereford; containing 269 inhabitants, and comprising, with the parish of Sutton St. Michael, 1398 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 1. 8.; net income, £195; patron, J. Johnstone, Esq. A school is endowed with £6. 13. per annum, and a house and garden.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish and union of Prescot, hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire; containing 4095 inhabitants. In the reign of Henry IV., this place was held by Alan de Norrys or Norres under the baron of Halton. In 1736, Mary, the heiress of her father, Thomas Norres, and of her uncle, Edward Norres, married Lord Sidney Beauclerk, by whose grandson the estate was sold. The Greens, Eltonheads, and Ecclestons held lands here; and the Hall, which existed prior to 1567, was at one time occupied by a branch of the Hollands. The township, which includes a large part of the town of St. Helen's, comprises 3616a. 1r. 29p., and abounds with coal, ironstone, and coarse potters'-clay: 64 acres are common or waste land. A church was built in 1848, of which the living is a rectory, in the patronage of King's College, Cambridge; net income, £450, with a house. The vicarial tithes of the township have been commuted for £196; and the impropriate for £350, payable to King's College.—See Helen's, St.

Sutton

SUTTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Beckingham, poor-law union of Newark, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln; containing 70 inhabitants.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish of Wymondham, incorporation and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of the county of Norfolk, 1½ mile (S. W. by S.) from Wymondham; containing 669 inhabitants.

Sutton (St. Michael)

SUTTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the Tunstead and Happing incorporation, hundred of Happing, E. division of Norfolk, 1 mile (S. E. by E.) from Stalham; containing 365 inhabitants. It comprises about 1500 acres, two-thirds of which are arable, and the rest marsh and water; the river Ant runs on the western boundary, and there is a broad in the parish, with a staith. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 16. 8., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £264. A glebehouse was erected in 1842. At the inclosure in 1800, about 60 acres were allotted to the poor.

Sutton

SUTTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Castor, union and soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, 1¼ mile (E. by S.) from Wansford; containing 121 inhabitants. It comprises 1400 acres, of which the surface is flat, and the soil a cold clay; the land is nearly equally divided between pasture and arable, and the river Nene runs through the chapelry. Here is a fine quarry of stone resembling that found at Ketton. The chapel is dedicated to St. Michael.

Sutton

SUTTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Granby, union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Bingham, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 14 miles (E. by S.) from Nottingham; containing 126 inhabitants.

Sutton (St. Bartholomew)

SUTTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of East Retford, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from East Retford; containing, with the township of Lound, 890 inhabitants, of whom 452 are in Sutton township. The parish comprises by admeasurement 4429 acres, of which 2008 are in the township of Sutton; the soil is a black sandy earth, producing fine crops of wheat and turnips, and very early peas and potatoes. The river Idle runs through the lands. Here is an ancient mansion of singular appearance, said to have been formerly much larger than at present, and the country residence of some of the ancestors of Earl Fitzwilliam. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Scrooby annexed, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £185; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Portland. The vicarial tithes were commuted for land in 1777; the glebe contains about 110 acres. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; also a school, erected in 1783, and endowed with about £28 a year. A mound, called Danes' Hill, now planted with trees, is supposed to have been an encampment.

Sutton

SUTTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Stanton-Harcourt, union of Witney, hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford; containing 259 inhabitants.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish of Diddlebury, union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of the county of Salop, 6 miles (N.) from Ludlow; containing 64 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Corve, which flows southward to Ludlow.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish and union of Drayton-in-Hales, Drayton division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of the county of Salop; containing 177 inhabitants.

Sutton (St. John)

SUTTON (St. John), a parish, in the union of Atcham, liberties of the borough of Shrewsbury, N. division of Salop, 2¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Shrewsbury; containing 69 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3; net income, £17; patron and impropriator, Lord Berwick. Sutton Spa, a fine mineral spring issuing from a stratum of ash-coloured clay, close to the village, is nearly similar in its properties to sea-water.

Sutton (All Saints)

SUTTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, hundred of Wilford, E. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (S. E. by E.) from Woodbridge; containing 707 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 7000 acres, and is bounded on the west by the navigable river Deben, where is a ferry to Woodford. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 2. 1., and in the gift of the Rev. Henry Thomas Day, LL.D.: the vicarage-house and offices, which were of a superior description, were some time since destroyed by fire. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Sutton (St. Nicholas)

SUTTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Epsom, Second division of the hundred of Wallington, E. division of Surrey, 5 miles (E. N. E.) from Epsom; containing 1304 inhabitants. It comprises 1768 acres of land, chiefly arable; and includes some extensive downs, on which between 200 and 300 sheep, remarkable for their small size and superior flavour, are annually reared. The soil in the northern part is clay; in the south, chalk; with an intervening narrow tract of sand. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 18. 4., and in the patronage of the Rev. Thomas Hatch; the tithes have been commuted for £520, and there are 33 acres of glebe. The church is partly in the decorated English style; it had formerly a wooden tower, now replaced by one of brick, and contains among other handsome monuments, chiefly of the Talbots, one to the memory of Lady Dorothy Brownlow. In Domesday book two churches are mentioned as existing here. There is a meeting-house for Independents; and a national school is supported by subscription. The parish contains a large chalk-pit, in which many curious fossils have been found.

Sutton (St. John)

SUTTON (St. John), a parish, in the hundred of Rotherbridge, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 5 miles (S.) from Petworth; containing 420 inhabitants. It comprises 2601 acres, of which 250 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 0. 10., and in the patronage of Colonel Wyndham: the tithes have been commuted for £340, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church is partly in the early English style.

Sutton

SUTTON, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Tenbury, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2½ miles (S. by E.) from Tenbury; containing 186 inhabitants, and comprising 1849 acres.

Sutton

SUTTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Norton, union of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York, 1 mile (S. by E.) from Malton; containing 98 inhabitants. This place, with the hamlet of Welham, forms a township, comprising 1270 acres, of which 360 are in Sutton: the village is a short distance west of the road from Malton to North Grimston. Whitewall, in the hamlet, has long been noted for its trainingstables.

Sutton (St. James)

SUTTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Sculcoatks, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York; containing 6384 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises about 4450 acres, is bounded on the west by the river Hull, on whose bank is the village of Stoneferry. It includes Witham, LimeStreet, the Groves, and Somergangs, forming the northeastern suburbs of the town of Hull, and now part of the borough. Many of the most opulent merchants of Hull have residences in the neighbourhood. Two large spinning factories, and one for weaving cotton, have been erected in the Groves; the Flax and Cotton Mill Company here alone employ 2500 hands. There are ropemanufactories, glass-works, and ship-building yards, all on a very extensive scale. The village of Sutton is large and well built, and pleasantly situated on a gently-rising and salubrious eminence. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £98; patron and impropriator, H. Broadley, Esq. The church had a chantry of six priests, endowed by John of Sutton, and valued at the Dissolution at £13. 18. 8. per annum. A church, dedicated to St. Mark, was erected in 1841 at the Groves, containing 1058 sittings; it is in the pointed style, and cost about £5500. An ecclesiastical parish was annexed to this edifice in Aug. 1844, under the act 6th and 7th of Victoria, cap. 37. The living is a perpetual curary, in the gift of the Crown and the Archbishop of York, alternately; net income, £220. In the village are two hospitals; one founded by Leonard Chamberlain, and rebuilt in 1800, for the maintenance of two aged widowers and eight widows; and the other erected in 1819, by the trustees of the late Mrs. Watson, for widows and daughters of clergymen. A house of White friars existed here in the time of Edward I.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish of Kirklington, union of Bedale, wapentake of Hallikeld, N. riding of York, 5¾ miles (N.) from Ripon; containing 97 inhabitants. The village is situated about half a mile south of the road from Tanfield to Sinderby. The tithes, including those of the township of Howgrave, have been commuted for £135. 4. There is a place of worshin for Wesleyans.

Sutton, with Healey, York.—See Healey.

SUTTON, with Healey, York.—See Healey.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish of Brotherton, Lower division of the wapentake of BarkstoneAsh, W. riding of York, 1 mile (N. E. by E.) from Ferry-Bridge; containing 52 inhabitants. The township comprises about 750 acres, and is chiefly the property of Sir John Ramsden; the soil is fertile. The river Aire pursues a devious course on the east, south, and west.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parishes of BurghWallis and Campsall, union of Doncaster, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 6¼ miles (N. by W.) from Doncaster; containing 133 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 730 acres. Rent-charges as commutations for the tithes have been awarded, namely, one of £113. 6. 8. to the impropriator, and one of £22. 13. 4. to the rector of Burgh-Wallis, who has also a glebe here of 24¼ acres. In 1723, Mrs. Middleton bequeathed 3½ acres of land for the poor.

Sutton

SUTTON, a township, in the parish of Kildwick, union of Keighley, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 5 miles (W. N. W.) from Keighley; containing 1292 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 2650 acres; a moor of nearly 1000 acres was inclosed in 1815, and a considerable portion of it has been brought into cultivation. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the manufacture of worsted stuffs, which is carried on extensively in a factory belonging to Messrs. Thomas Bairston and Brothers, of Royds Hill. The village is neatly built of stone. A rent-charge of £33 has been awarded as a commutation for the vicarial tithes, and one of £46. 18. 6. for the appropriate, payable to the Dean and Chapter of Christ-Church, Oxford. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Sutton-At-Hone (St. John the Baptist)

SUTTON-AT-HONE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Dartford, hundred of Axton, Dartford, and Wilmington, lathe of Sutton-atHone, W. division of Kent, 2½ miles (S. by E.) from Dartford; containing, with the hamlet of Swanley, 1128 inhabitants. This parish, from which the lathe derives its name, is pleasantly situated on the river Darent, and is intersected by the road from Dartford to Seven-Oaks. It comprises 3587 acres, whereof 408 are in wood. The village, on the bank of the river, has an interesting appearance, and the surrounding scenery is agreeably diversified, and enlivened with some good houses, among which are Sutton Place and St. John's, the latter occupying the site of an ancient commandery. Near the northern extremity of the parish is Hawley House, a mansion of considerable antiquity. The paper manufacture is carried on. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £519; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Rochester. There is a vicarage-house, with a glebe of 22 acres. The church, an ancient structure with some portions in the decorated English style, was partly burnt down in 1615, having been accidentally fired by some persons while shooting bats. Here are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; also an almshouse founded by Katherine Wrott, in 1596. Jeffrey Fitz-Piers, Earl of Essex, in the reign of Richard I. or of John, gave his estates in the parish, for the establishment and endowment of an hospital for three chaplains and thirteen brethren; and about the same time, Robert Basinge granted the manor to the Knights Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem.