Sutton-Basset - Sutton-Wick

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

274-280

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'Sutton-Basset - Sutton-Wick', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 274-280. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51320 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Sutton-Basset (St. Mary)

SUTTON-BASSET (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (N. E.) from Harborough; containing 179 inhabitants. It is bounded on the west by the river Welland, and consists of 725 acres. The living is a vicarage, united to that of Weston-by-Welland.

Sutton-Benger (All Saints)

SUTTON-BENGER (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Chippenham, hundred of Malmesbury, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts, 4½ miles (N. N. E.) from Chippenham; containing 526 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Chippenham to Wootton-Bassett, and on that from Bristol to London; the river Avon and the Great Western railway also run through it. The area is 1156 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 4.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £300, and there is a vicarage-house, with a glebe of 38 acres, of which 18 are in this parish and 20 in Brinkworth.

Sutton-Bingham

SUTTON-BINGHAM, a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Houndsborough, Berwick, and Coker, W. division of Somerset, 4 miles (S. by W.) from Yeovil; containing 66 inhabitants. The parish comprises 549a. 2r. 23p. Stone is quarried for building, and for burning into lime. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 15. 10., and in the gift of W. Helyar, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £129; there is a rectory-house, and the glebe contains about 76 acres. The church was formerly a chapel to Malmesbury Abbey, and is principally in the early English style; the nave is separated from the chancel by a handsome arch.

Sutton, Bishop's (St. Nicholas)

SUTTON, BISHOP'S (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Alresford, hundred of Bishop's-Sutton, Alton and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 1 mile (E. S. E.) from Alresford; containing 517 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 2903 acres, of which the soil is chalky and flinty. Fairs are held on the Thursday after the festival of the Holy Trinity, and on November 6th. The living is a vicarage, with that of Ropley annexed, valued in the king's books at £19. 10. 2½.; net income, £350; patron, John Deacon, Esq.; impropriators, several proprietors. There is a place of worship for Independents. The bishops of Winchester had anciently a palace here, the remains of which have been converted into a malt-house.

Sutton-Bonnington

SUTTON-BONNINGTON, a parish, in the union of Loughborough, S. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe and of the county of Nottingham, 2 miles (S. E. by E.) from Kegworth; containing 1307 inhabitants. The living consists of the rectories of St. Anne and St. Michael, the former valued in the king's books at £4. 17. 6., and in the gift of the Crown, with a net income of £219: the latter valued at £15. 2. 1.; net income, £462; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Bristol. The tithes of the township of St. Anne were commuted for land in 1774, and those of St. Michael in 1776, under inclosure acts. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists; also a school endowed with £40 per annum.

Sutton Bridge.—See Sutton, Long.

SUTTON BRIDGE.—See Sutton, Long.

Sutton-By-Dovor (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SUTTON-BY-DOVOR (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Eastry, hundred of Cornilo, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Deal; containing 160 inhabitants. It consists of 1055 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, consolidated in 1835 with the rectory of Little Mongeham, by act of parliament; appropriator, the Archbishop of Canterbury. The church is a small structure in the early English style of architecture, with a circular east end.

Sutton-Chart, Kent.—See Chart, Sutton.

SUTTON-CHART, Kent.—See Chart, Sutton.

Sutton-Cheney

SUTTON-CHENEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Market-Bosworth; containing 352 inhabitants. The Ashby-de-la-Zouch canal passes in the vicinity. The chapel is dedicated to St. James. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also an almshouse consisting of six apartments, founded by Sir William Robarts in the 11th year of James I., and endowed by him with £24 per annum.

Sutton-Coldfield (Holy Trinity)

SUTTON-COLDFIELD (Holy Trinity), an incorporated market-town and parish, having separate jurisdiction, in the union of Aston, locally in the Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 26 miles (N. W.) from Warwick, and 110 (N. W. by N.) from London; containing 4300 inhabitants. This place, which is of remote antiquity, is supposed to have derived its name from its situation to the south of Lichfield; and in the time of Edward the Confessor belonged to Edwine, Earl of Mercia. After the Norman invasion the Conqueror retained it in his possession, together with the adjacent woods, then called a forest, which extended beyond the limits of the county; and it continued to form part of the royal demesnes till the time of Henry I., who granted it to Roger, Earl of Warwick, in exchange for the manors of Hockham and Langham, in Rutlandshire. The chase, which stretched from the river Tame to the river Bourne, was a favourite resort of the earls of Warwick, who built the ancient manor-house, a noble mansion of great strength, but of which few vestiges can now be traced. In the reign of Edward I., William de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, claimed for the manor, and for the town which had arisen here, the privilege of a court leet, with assize of bread and beer, free chase, infangthef, tumbrell, wait, and gallows; and in the 28th of the same reign, Guy, Earl of Warwick, obtained the grant of a weekly market and an annual fair.


Seal and Arms.

The manor subsequently became the property of Richard Neville, in right of Anne his wife, and, on his taking part with Henry VI., was seized by Edward IV., and granted to Sir Edmund Mountfort,one of the king's barons, for ten years, the rangership of the chase being given at the same time to John Holt, Esq., for life. The property was afterwards settled upon the daughters of Lady Anne Neville, and eventually came to the crown by special grant, confirmed by parliament. The manorhouse was then taken down by one of the king's officers, who sold most of the materials to the Marquess of Dorset, for the erection of his seat at Broadgate, in the county of Leicester. The market, also, was forsaken, and the town at length fell into a state of decay, from which it was restored in the reign of Henry VIII., by the munificence of John Harman alias Vesey, a native of Sutton-Coldfield, who was successively vicar of St. Nicholas in Coventry; dean of the chapel royal at Windsor, and tutor to the Princess Mary, then the only daughter of King Henry; president of Wales; and lastly Bishop of Exeter. This prelate rebuilt the town in the 19th of Henry VIII., obtained for the inhabitants a charter of incorporation, gave the town, manor, and chase to the corporate body, to be held by them at a fee-farm rent of £58 per annum, built a town-hall and prison, and threw open the chase for the benefit of the poor. He also attempted to introduce the manufacture of woollen-cloth and kerseys, for which he built several looms, but the forester-like habits of the population prevented its success.

The town is pleasantly situated on a steep acclivity, on the road from Birmingham to Lichfield, and consists principally of one long street, the houses of which are mostly modern, well built, and of handsome appearance. The inhabitants are amply supplied with water from springs; and the extensive park immediately adjoining, in which they have the right of pasture, with the privilege of sporting at all times, renders the town a desirable place of residence. The chief manufacture now carried on is that of spades, shovels, and saws, in which many of the population are employed; and some mills here, belonging to Messrs. Webster and Son, by whose family they have been conducted for nearly a century, are of great celebrity for the production of steel wire for wool and cotton cards, needles, fish-hooks, and strings for musical instruments. About the year 1826, a superior method of making music-wire was introduced by Mr. John Bird, who had the management of the works; and from the attention bestowed on its manipulation, the wire has attained such a degree of perfection as to supersede entirely the use of the celebrated Berlin wire, both in England and on the continent. Near the premises a hedge of holly, almost three-quarters of a mile in length, has been planted, which will eventually be a great ornament to the neighbourhood. The Birmingham and Fazeley canal passes the south-eastern extremity of the parish. The market is on Monday; and fairs for cattle, sheep, and pedlery, are held on TrinityMonday and the 8th of November. Under the charter of Henry VIII., obtained by Bishop Vesey, and confirmed, with additional privileges, by Charles II., the town is governed by a warden, two capital burgesses, and 22 other burgesses, under the style of "the Warden and Society of the Royal Town of Sutton-Coldfield;" the warden and capital burgesses hold courts of quarter and petty sessions, and the corporation are lords of the manor. The town-hall is a neat brick building, in which are the armorial bearings of Bishop Vesey, emblazoned on a shield surmounted with a mitre.

The parish comprises about 15,500 acres, of which nearly 2000 are within the park, and the remainder chiefly arable, with a due proportion of meadow, pasture, and woodland. The surface is boldly undulated, the scenery finely varied, and enriched with stately trees; the soil is in general light and gravelly, and there are some extensive quarries of freestone. The park was part of the ancient royal chase, and abounded with valuable timber, a fall of which, some years since, enabled the corporation to purchase £32,000 stock, forming the chief source of their revenue: the numerous large oaks and other trees still remaining add greatly to the beauty of its appearance. King John was the last monarch who took the diversion of hunting in the chase. The Ikeneld-street enters the park near an artificial mount on which Charles I. harangued his Shropshire troops, and which is called the King's Standing; the road is distinctly traceable for nearly two miles through the grounds, and hence diverges towards the Lichfield road, to meet the Watling-street, near the site of the ancient Etocetum. In the park are some large sheets of water, one of which covers nearly 35 acres, and from which streams descend in various directions, giving motion to eleven mills.

Newhall, an ancient mansion in the parish, originally built about the year 1200, was held under the Earl of Warwick in the reign of Edward III., by William de Sutton; it was rebuilt in 1360, when it obtained its present appellation, and was enlarged in 1590. In 1796, the tower and other additions were built by the late Mr. Chadwick, after whose decease it was for many years uninhabited, and was falling into decay, when Mr. Jacot (Des Combes) became its occupier, and restored it to its present condition. Annexed is a manor of 400 acres. Four-Oaks Hall, a fine mansion, is the seat of Sir Edmund Cradock Hartopp, Bart. Moor Hall was originally erected by Bishop Vesey: the present mansion was added to the old edifice by Francis Beynon Hackett, Esq., in whose family the property has been for many generations. The house is a handsome square stone building, standing in an ornamental park, and commands a beautiful view of the surrounding country. Ashfurlong House was also built by Bishop Vesey, and much of the old mansion is still left; the front is of modern erection, and presents an elegant appearance. This is also the property of Mr. Hackett. The two mansions stand upon the edge of some commons, which were inclosed about fifteen years ago, and had previously formed part of one of the largest tracts of waste land in the midland counties. Langley Hall was the seat of the powerful and wealthy family of Jesson, now quite extinct, the last descendant having died a few years ago. The remains of the gardens and fish-ponds are still to be seen, and what were the stables are now a farmhouse; the house itself was pulled down by the late Sir Robert Peel, who had purchased the estate. Peddimore Hall lies in a retired valley below Langley heath, and is the property of Robert Scott, Esq. It was anciently a religious house (hospitium) intended for wayfarers, and no doubt was much required for such a purpose, standing, as it does even now, in a lonely and unfrequented district which formed part of the forest of Arden.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £33. 9. 2., and in the patronage of William Riland Kirkpatrick Bedford, Esq., by whose family the advowson has been held since the year 1691; net income, £2500. The tithes were commuted for land and cornrents in 1824. The church is an ancient structure, originally built in the 12th century, but subsequently enlarged, and combines various styles of architecture; the aisles were added by Bishop Vesey, and part of the nave which fell down about 70 years since has been rebuilt by the corporation, at an expense of £1500. In the chancel is a recumbent figure of the bishop (who died in 1555, at the age of 103, and was buried here), with a mitre on his head, and a crosier in his right hand. There are separate incumbencies at Hill and Warmley, in the parish; and the Roman Catholics have a chapel.

The free grammar school was founded by Bishop Vesey, in 1527-8, for the maintenance of a learned layman to teach grammar and rhetoric, for which purpose he conveyed certain lands within the parish now producing a rental of £400 per annum. On the decease of the late master in 1842, an alteration took place in the arrangements; a second mastership was created, with a liberal salary, and the course of studies was enlarged, so as to comprehend all the branches of classical and commercial education, upon the payment of a small sum by the pupils. The school-house, which had fallen partly into decay, was in 1728 rebuilt by the then master, on a more eligible site at the upper end of the town; it is a spacious and handsome building, and is well adapted for the reception of the boarders whom the master has the privilege of taking. Among the distinguished men educated in the school, have been, Robert Burton, author of the Anatomy of Melancholy, and his brother William, author of the History of Leicestershire. James Eccleston, Esq., B.A., author of the valuable Introduction to English Antiquities, and of several classical works, is the present head master. Six schools, in which more than 400 children, of whom 240 are clothed, are instructed on the national plan, are supported by the corporation, who distribute nearly all the rest of their revenue in charitable donations. Marriage portions of £24 each are annually given to four poor maidens, natives or long residents of the parish; and about 120 neat cottages, mostly with good gardens and a few acres of land attached, are let at very low rents to deserving labourers. £30 are distributed yearly in blankets to the poor. Medical attendance and childbed linen are gratuitously supplied to poor lying-in women of good character; and ten almshouses have been erected by the corporation, in which the aged poor may live rent free, a married couple receiving 25s. per week, and a single person 15s., with some coal.

Sutton-Courtney (All Saints)

SUTTON-COURTNEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Abingdon, hundred of Ock, county of Berks, 2 miles (S. by E.) from Abingdon; containing, with the chapelry of Appleford and the township of Sutton-Wick, 1378 inhabitants, of whom 909 are in Sutton-Courtney township. The parish comprises 5141a. 1r. 17p., and the Wilts and Berks canal passes through it. A paper-mill employs about 25 persons. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 13. 4.; income, £148; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Windsor. The church is very ancient; it has a wooden rood-loft, and a Norman font surrounded by pillars and enriched with sculptured foliage. There is a chapel of ease at Appleford; and at Sutton-Courtney is a place of worship for Independents. Edmund Bradstock, in 1607, bequeathed a house and some lands, of the present annual value of £80, for education; and an almshouse was erected in 1820, pursuant to the will of Francis Elderfield, Esq., who endowed it for six widows. Abbey House was formerly a residence for the monks of Abingdon.

Sutton, East (St. Peter and St. Paul)

SUTTON, EAST (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Hollingbourne, hundred of Eyhorne, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 6 miles (S. E.) from Maidstone; containing 387 inhabitants, it comprises 1590 acres, and is crossed by the ridge of hills bounding the Weald, of which latter the southern side of the parish forms a part. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Sutton-Valence: the church is a handsome edifice, and contains some interesting monuments.

Sutton St. Edmund's

SUTTON ST. EDMUND'S, a chapelry, in the parish of Long Sutton, union of Holbeach, wapentake of Elloe, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 10 miles (E. by N.) from Crowland; containing 776 inhabitants. This chapelry is in Sutton-Fen, which was inclosed in 1790; and comprises by computation 6230 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Long Sutton, with a net income of £216, partly arising from land purchased with Queen Anne's Bounty, but chiefly from about 100 acres, of which 39 were private gifts, and the remainder allotted at the inclosure. There are places of worship for Baptists and Primitive Methodists. A free school is endowed with about 15 acres of land; and the poor have nearly £100 per annum, the interest of money and rent of land, the bequests of various donors.

Sutton, Full

SUTTON, FULL, a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 5½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Pocklington; containing 146 inhabitants. The parish comprises 900 acres by computation, of which two-thirds are arable, and the rest pasture; and is bounded on the north by the York and Bridlington road. The surface is generally flat, and the soil of a productive quality. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 12. 8½.; net income, £136; patron, Lord Feversham: there are 120 acres of glebe, and a small glebe-house. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Sutton-Grange

SUTTON-GRANGE, a township, in the parish and liberty of Ripon, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Ripon; containing 101 inhabitants. The township comprises about 950 acres. Sutton-Grange mansion is now a farmhouse.

Sutton, Great

SUTTON, GREAT, a township, in the parish of Eastham, union, and Higher division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 7 miles (N. N. W.) from Chester; containing 203 inhabitants. In the Domesday survey this place appears to have been held in moieties by Robert Fitz-Hugh, Baron of Montalt, and the Bishop of Chester; but it seems that the whole merged at an early period into the possession of the monks of St. Werburgh. It continued, with the adjacent manor of Little Sutton, to be held by them until the Dissolution, and in the last century passed to its present proprietors, the White family, of Sutton Hall. The township comprises an area of 1050 acres, whose prevailing soil is clay; and contains a few farmhouses and other ordinary buildings, scattered on the side of the road between Chester and the ferries on the Mersey. The Chester and Birkenhead railway has a station in the vicinity. The Independents have a place of worship here.

Sutton, Guilden

SUTTON, GUILDEN, a parish, in the union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Chester; containing about 220 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1000 acres, of which the surface is in general flat, and the soil stiff and marly; the arable and pasture are in about equal portions. The village is seated in a valley. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £50; patron, Lord Stanley; impropriator, the Rev. Rowland E. Warburton: there is a small glebe-house.

Sutton-In-Ashfield (St. Mary)

SUTTON-IN-ASHFIELD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 3½ miles (W. S. W.) from Mansfield; containing, with the hamlet of Hucknall-under-Huthwaite, 6557 inhabitants, of whom 5670 are in Sutton township. The village is situated on an eminence, and comprises several streets, covering a considerable extent of ground: limestone of excellent quality abounds in the vicinity. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in the manufacture of cotton hose and lace. A few persons find employment in making a coarse kind of red pottery ware; and the Mansfield and Pinxton railway, which passes through the parish, affords facility for conveying the produce. A book society has been established for several years. There is a small customary market for provisions on Saturday. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, without surplice fees, £100; patron, the Duke of Devonshire; impropriator, the Duke of Portland: the tithes were commuted for land in 1794. The church, which stands on an eminence, has a handsome octagonal spire. There are places of worship for General and Particular Baptists, Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans; and a national school for boys is partly supported by about £10 per annum from benefactions. Near the village is Mapple Wells, the water of which has been successfully used in rheumatic cases. Joseph Whitehead, a frame-work knitter, remarkable for his attainments in astronomy and mechanics, and who constructed an orrery upon Ferguson's principle, and other complicated pieces of machinery, was born here in 1784.

Sutton-In-The-Elms

SUTTON-IN-THE-ELMS, a township, in the parish of Broughton-Astley, union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 6½ miles (E.) from Hinckley; containing 136 inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Sutton-In-The-Marsh (St. Clement)

SUTTON-IN-THE-MARSH (St. Clement), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Alford; containing 274 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; patron, the Prebendary of Sutton-in-Marisco in the Cathedral of Lincoln. The great tithes have been commuted for £380; and the vicarial for £17. 18., with a glebe of 16 acres.

Sutton, St. James

SUTTON, ST. JAMES, a chapelry, in the parish of Long Sutton, union of Holbeach, wapentake of Elloe, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 5½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Holbeach; containing 535 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2870 acres: the South Holland drain passes on the west and north. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Long Sutton, with a net income of £66: the great tithes have been commuted for £526, and the vicarial for £124. The present chapel consists of the chancel and steeple of the original edifice, composed of brick and stone. Near it is a remarkable stone called Ivy Cross. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. About £100 per annum, arising from 40 acres of land, the produce of various bequests, are distributed in coal and money to the poor.

Sutton, King's (St. Peter)

SUTTON, KING'S (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Brackley, hundred of King's-Sutton, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4 miles (S. E.) from Banbury; containing, with the hamlet of Walton, and part of the hamlets of Astrop, Charlton, and Purston, 1297 inhabitants. The parish is separated from the county of Oxford by the river Cherwell, parallel to which runs the Oxford canal. It comprises by admeasurement 4416 acres, nearly two-thirds whereof are pasture, and between 200 and 300 acres rich meadow land adjacent to the river; the soil passes through several varieties, from a stiff clay to a light loam. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8.; net income, £83; patron and impropriator, William Willes, Esq. The church is a fine edifice with a magnificent tower and spire; many parts are of Norman character, and the pulpit, which is extremely curious, is perhaps the oldest wooden pulpit in England. There are places of worship for dissenters.

Sutton, Little

SUTTON, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Eastham, union, and Higher division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 7¾ miles (N. by W.) from Chester; containing 426 inhabitants. The manor was held by the monks of Chester so early as the reign of Edward the Confessor, and the record of Domesday proves that at its date it remained in their possession. The charter of Hugh Lupus to the monastery confirmed the manor to the conventual tenants; and here, subsequently, was one of four principal manor-houses which, by the charter of Earl Randal, the monks were to provide for the holding of their courts, and which Richard II. gave the abbot a licence to fortify. After the Dissolution, Little Sutton was granted to the Dean and Chapter, and passed with their other estates to Sir Richard Cotton, as appears by a post mort. inq. of the 3rd and 4th of Philip and Mary, soon after which the manor was purchased by Sir Hugh Cholmondeley, and thus became the property of the Cholmondeleys of Vale Royal. In this family it continued until sold, in 1798, to the father of the present owner, Joseph White, Esq. The township comprises 1108 acres, the soil of which is partly loam and partly clay. The road from Chester to Birkenhead runs through, and the Chester and Birkenhead railway has a station in the vicinity. The village is formed of a group of ordinary farmhouses: the principal part of its former little trade was derived from the stage-coaches which passed through it, before the establishment of the railway. The Independents have a place of worship.

Sutton, Long (St. Mary)

SUTTON, LONG (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Holbeach, wapentake of Elloe, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 4¾ miles (E. by S.) from Holbeach; containing 5845 inhabitants, of whom 3736 are in the township. The parish comprises, exclusively of its three chapelries of Sutton St. Edmund, St. James, and St. Nicholas, 8738 acres of land, chiefly rich marsh and fen; 427 acres are common or waste. It had anciently a monastic cell, called Ketel; John of Gaunt is said to have had a seat here; and on the marsh is a farm named King's House, where King John halted after he had lost his carriages and baggage in crossing the Wash. There is a considerable market for corn and cattle; and fairs are held on May 13th and 14th, and the Friday after September 25th. The village has risen within the present century, and especially within the last fifteen years, to the rank of a handsome and flourishing town, an advance mainly owing to the erection of a bridge at the mouth of the river Nene, and the formation of a road between the town and the river. The bridge is a massive structure of oak, having a platform, with a moveable cast-iron centre 52 feet in the span; the Wash embankment connected with it, which was completed in July 1831, is two miles in length, and an immense tract of fertile land has been recovered from the Wash by its construction. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £40, and in the patronage of Trustees: the great tithes have been commuted for £1973. 13. 6., and the vicarial for £432. 6. 6. The church is a fine structure, with an ancient stone steeple and a lofty spire, serving as a landmark to mariners in the Wash. St. Matthew's church, Sutton-Bridge, is in the early English style, and consists of a chancel, nave, north and south aisles, and a tower at the west end; the first stone was laid in July 1841, by the treasurer of Guy's Hospital, and the governors of that institution were the principal contributors to the erection: the patronage is vested in the Bishop of Lincoln. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Wesleyans, and Unitarians. A free school was endowed, under a bequest by Robert Phillips, in 1492, and is now conducted in a commodious building erected by subscription in 1835. There are almshouses for six widows, who receive £6 per annum each. In 1603 Thomas Allen bequeathed estates now producing about £220 per annum, for various purposes in the church, the apprenticing of children, and the relief of the poor; and other bequests have been made yielding about £40 per annum, for charitable uses.

Sutton, Long (Holy Trinity)

SUTTON, LONG (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Langport, hundred of Somerton, W. division of Somerset, 2¾ miles (S. S. W.) from Somerton; containing, with the tything of Knowle, and the hamlets of Load and Upton, 979 inhabitants. The river Yeo, or Ivel, runs along the southern boundary of the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 18.; impropriator, the Earl of Burlington: the great tithes have been commuted for £400, and the small for £230; the vicar has a glebe of 17 acres. Roman coins, pateræ, and other antiquities, have been found in the neighbourhood.

Sutton, Long (All Saints)

SUTTON, LONG (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Crondall, Odiham and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3 miles (S.) from Odiham; containing 321 inhabitants, and comprising 2244a. 3r. 2p. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £40; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St. Cross.

Sutton-Maddock (St. Mary)

SUTTON-MADDOCK (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Shiffnall, Shiffnall division of the hundred of Brimstree, S. division of Salop, 6 miles (N.) from Bridgnorth; containing 352 inhabitants. The Severn bounds the parish on the west, and the Shropshire canal forms a junction with that river in the vicinity. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Kemberton, and valued in the king's books at £5: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £ 145. 11.; and the vicarial for £220, with a glebe of 18¾ acres.

Sutton-Mallet

SUTTON-MALLET, a chapelry, in the parish of Moorlinch, union of Bridgwater, hundred of Whitley, W. division of Somerset, 5¼ miles (E.) from Bridgwater; containing 126 inhabitants. The chapel has been enlarged. A rent-charge of £95 is received as a commutation for the impropriate tithes, and one of £60 for the vicarial: there is a glebe of 2½ acres.

Sutton-Mandeville (All Saints)

SUTTON-MANDEVILLE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 11 miles (W.) from Salisbury; containing 275 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Salisbury to Shaftesbury, and comprises about 1500 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the gift of W. Wyndham, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £240; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe consists of about 40 acres.

Sutton Montis or Montague (Holy Trinity)

SUTTON MONTIS or MONTAGUE (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Sherborne; containing 191 inhabitants. It comprises 498 acres by computation; the soil is fertile, and the scenery of pleasing character. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 12. 1., and in the gift of the Rev. W. B. Leach, to whose family the advowson has belonged since the Reformation: the tithes have been commuted for £146. 17., and the glebe comprises 37 acres.

Sutton-Near-Seaford

SUTTON-NEAR-SEAFORD, a parish, in the union of Eastbourne, hundred of Flexborough, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, 11 miles (S. E. by S.) from Lewes. This parish and Seaford together comprise by admeasurement 2235 acres, of which 1298 are arable, 926 meadow and pasture, and 11 woodland and waste. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Seaford annexed; patrons, the Prebendaries of Sutton and Seaford in Chichester Cathedral. The tithes belonging to the impropriator have been commuted for £500, with a glebe of 8 acres, and those of the vicar for £240, with a glebe of one acre. The church is desecrated.

Sutton St. Nicholas, or Sutton-Bourne

SUTTON ST. NICHOLAS, or Sutton-Bourne, a village and chapelry, in the parish of Long Sutton, union of Holbeach, wapentake of Elloe, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Holbeach; containing 798 inhabitants. This village, sometimes called Lutton, which is supposed to be a corruption of Lode town, from the lodes or drains in the neighbourhood, was formerly the chief place in the parish. The chapelry comprises 3656 acres of land, mostly fertile marshes, stretching eastward to the Wash; 85 acres are common or waste. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Long Sutton: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £859. 11. 2., and the vicarial for £166. 2. 10. The chapel is a neat ancient edifice, with some fine Norman arches, and a tower surmounted by a conical spire 159 feet high. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. Dr. Busby, the distinguished master of Westminster school, was born here in 1606.

Sutton-On-The-Forest (All Saints)

SUTTON-ON-THE-FOREST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York; containing, with Huby township, 1123 inhabitants, of whom 567 are in the township of Sutton, 8 miles (N. by W.) from York. This parish, which forms part of the ancient forest of Galtres, is skirted by the river Foss, and comprises by computation about 10,000 acres; the soil is generally sandy, with a gravel and a clay substratum. The surface is slightly elevated, and distinct views are obtained of York and its noble cathedral from Sutton Hall, the residence of William Charles Harland, Esq., who has directed trees to be cut away for some distance, as they obstructed the prospect. The village is on the road from York to Helmsley. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £17. 3. 4.; net income, £390, with an excellent house; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York. It was endowed with a portion of the great tithes of Huby by Walter de Grey, archbishop in 1227. The church is a very handsome structure, with a square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and parochial schools at Sutton and Huby are supported by subscription. At St. John's well is a strong chalybeate water. The celebrated Laurence Sterne was vicar of the parish.

Sutton-On-The-Hill (St. Michael)

SUTTON-ON-THE-HILL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 8 miles (W. by S.) from Derby; containing, with the hamlet of Ash, and the township of Orleston with Thurvaston, 594 inhabitants, of whom 138 are in Sutton township. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 16. 8.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. G. Buckston, A.B.; impropriator, Thomas Cox, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £167; and the vicarial for £280, with a glebe of 2½ acres, and a house. The church stands on an eminence, and has a tower and spire forming a conspicuous object in the surrounding country. Fourteen children are educated and apprenticed for an annuity of £20, bequeathed in 1722 by Anne Jackson; the schoolhouse was erected by subscription in 1736. All the lands in the township, except one farm, were given by Humphrey Chetham to the Blue-coat hospital at Manchester.

Sutton-Pointz

SUTTON-POINTZ, a tything, in the parish of Preston, union of Weymouth, liberty of Sutton-Pointz, Dorchester division of Dorset, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Melcombe-Regis. Here was formerly a chapel dedicated to St. Giles, some remains of which are still visible.

Sutton-Scotney

SUTTON-SCOTNEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Wonston, union of Winchester, hundred of Buddlesgate, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5¾ miles (S.) from Whitchurch; containing 448 inhabitants.

Sutton-Under-Brailes (St. Thomas à Bucket)

SUTTON-UNDER-BRAILES (St. Thomas à Bucket), a parish, in the union of Shipston, hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 5 miles (S. E.) from Shipston; containing 232 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4.; net income, £313; patron, the Bishop of London. The tithes were commuted for land and an annual money payment in 1804; there is a rectoryhouse, built in 1825, and the glebe altogether contains about 180 acres.

Sutton-Under-Whitestone-Cliffe

SUTTON-UNDER-WHITESTONE-CLIFFE, a township, in the parish of Felix-Kirk, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 3½ miles (E. by N.) from Thirsk; containing 365 inhabitants. The village is pleasantly situated on the road from Thirsk to Helmsley, and near a high cliff yielding excellent limestone and freestone: a lake here of about 17 acres abounds in pike and perch. The Archbishop of York is lord of the manor. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Sutton-Upon-Derwent (St. Michael)

SUTTON-UPON-DERWENT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 8 miles (E. S. E.) from York; containing 407 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 3407 acres, including the township of Woodhouse: the village is pleasantly situated on the Derwent, which is crossed by a substantial stone bridge. The surface is slightly undulated, and the scenery picturesque, presenting views of the river and the Wolds; the soil is a sandy loam, except in Woodhouse, where it is all sand. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 14. 7.; net income, £470, with a commodious house and good garden; patron, Major-Gen. Richard Goddard Hare, K.C.B.: the tithes of the township of Sutton were commuted for land and a money payment in 1776. The church is an ancient structure, with a square tower, and was repaired and improved in 1841. The springs are strongly impregnated with iron.

Sutton-Upon-Trent (All Saints)

SUTTON-UPON-TRENT (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (S. E.) from Tuxford; containing 1142 inhabitants. The village is large and well built, and is pleasantly situated on the great north road, and on the western bank of the river Trent. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8.; net income, £200; patron, the Rev. R. Thompson; impropriator, J. E. Denison, Esq. The tithes, with certain exceptions, were commuted for land and a money payment in 1803. The church exhibits a mixture of various styles, and is a handsome structure, with a tower surmounted by a slender spire. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Sutton-Valence (St. Mary)

SUTTON-VALENCE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hollingbourne, hundred of Eyhorne, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 6 miles (S. E. by S.) from Maidstone, on the road to Tenterden; containing 1138 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2132 acres, of which 10 acres are in wood. The soil in the Weald portion, to a considerable extent, is heavy clay, but that on the hill is lighter, and more easily worked; hops and corn are produced, and fruit in large quantities for the London market. The village, called Town-Sutton, is situated below the ridge of hills bounding the Weald, and commands views of several towns and villages, and an extensive prospect towards the sea, in the direction of Ashford. A strong castle formerly stood here, and part of its keep still remains, a highly picturesque ruin overgrown with ivy, and having branches of trees sprouting from its walls. The living is a vicarage, with that of East Sutton annexed, valued in the king's books at £7. 9. 7.; net income, £318; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Rochester. The church was rebuilt in 1828, in a plain substantial style, and has a square tower. There is a place of worship for Independents. A free grammar school was founded pursuant to letters-patent of the 18th of Elizabeth, and was endowed with £35 per annum; also with £200, the gift of Francis Robins, in 1721, for two exhibitions, of £10 a year each, in St. John's College, Cambridge. Mr. Lambe has founded and endowed almshouses for six widows.

Sutton-Veny (St. Leonard)

SUTTON-VENY (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union and hundred of Warminster, Warminster and S. divisions of Wilts, 3 miles (S. E.) from Warminster; containing 855 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 3404 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21; net income, £800; patron, G. W. W. Heneage, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and annual money payments in 1799; there is a rectory-house, and the glebe altogether contains 814 acres. The church has been enlarged. Here are places of worship for Baptists and Independents; and a parochial school supported by subscription.

Sutton-Waldron (St. Bartholomew)

SUTTON-WALDRON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Shaftesbury, hundred of Redlane, Shaston division of Dorset, 5 miles (S.) from Shaftesbury 5 containing 251 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road between Blandford and Shaftesbury, and comprises 1012 acres, of which 297 are common or waste land; the surface is considerably diversified, and is watered by a rivulet which falls into the Stour. A small quantity of copper-ore has been found. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 9. 4½.; net income, £169; patron, H. C. Sturt, Esq. The glebe contains 20 acres. A new church with a tower and spire, erected at the cost of the incumbent, the Rev. A. Huxtable, was consecrated in Nov. 1847.

Sutton-Wick

SUTTON-WICK, a township, in the parish of Sutton-Courtney, union of Abingdon, hundred of Ock, county of Berks, 1¾ mile (S. by W.) from Abingdon; containing 282 inhabitants, and comprising 1230a. 1r. 17p. Certain tithes were commuted for land and annual money payments in 1801.