Tarbock - Taston

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

300-303

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'Tarbock - Taston', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 300-303. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51328+ Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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Tarbock

TARBOCK, a township, in the parish of Huyton, union of Prescot, hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Huyton, and 8 (E. by S.) from Liverpool; containing 740 inhabitants. Henry de Tarbock or Torbock, who was early the lord of Tarbock, Roby, Huyton, Knowsley, and other manors, had two sons. The elder of these, Robert, was sometimes distinguished by the Norman patronymic FitzHenry, which the English rendered Harrison, and sometimes was denominated from his principal residence, de Lathom; while Richard, the other son, inheriting Tarbock, designated himself from that estate. Henry Tarbock, in the 20th of Henry VII., held the manor as parcel of the manor of Knowsley. Sir Edward Tarbock was knighted at Whitehall by James I. in 1606. Henry Tarbock died l6th Charles I., holding lands in Sutton, but without property in Tarbock: the family is said to have lost the inheritance by gaming, and the lordship is now vested in the Earl of Sefton. The township comprises about 2245 acres, whereof 2200 are arable and pasture, and 25 woodland; the surface is flat, and the soil a strong clay, with some parts sandy. There is a redsandstone quarry; coal is abundant, and many of the inhabitants are employed in the collieries. A brewery, established about eighty years ago, is conducted by Mr. George Fleetwood. The Huyton and Runcorn branch of the great North-Western railway passes through the township.

Tardebigg (St. Bartholomew)

TARDEBIGG (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Bromsgrove, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Droitwich and Bromsgrove, and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Bromsgrove; containing, with the chapelry of Redditch, the hamlet of Bordesley, and the townships of Tutnall with Cobley, Bentley-Pauncefoot, and Webheath, 4877 inhabitants. This parish, the name of which signifies "the big tower," or "the tower on the hill," is situated on the road from Bromsgrove to Alcester, and comprises 10,832 acres of a very fertile but heavy clayey soil. About 3000 acres are woodland, and the remainder arable and meadow in about equal portions. Hewell, the seat of the Hon. Robert Henry Clive, is situated here in a demesne highly embellished, in which is a lake of 30 acres; and Foxlydiate House, the property and residence of William Hemming, Esq., has neat pleasure-grounds and gardens attached. The Birmingham and Worcester canal and the Birmingham and Gloucester railway run through the parish. Fairs are held on the first Monday in August and the third Monday in September, for cattle. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the patronage of Mr. and Lady Harriet Clive, to whom the impropriation also belongs: the great tithes have been commuted for £1254; and the vicarial tithes for £600, with a glebe of 41½ acres, and a house. The church, rebuilt in 1776, is an elegant structure in the Grecian style, with a very beautiful spire: it contains a monument to Sir Thomas Cookes, Bart., a former proprietor, and founder of Worcester College, Oxford; and another by Chantrey to the late Earl of Plymouth, whose remains are interred in the family vault beneath. This edifice, and the chapel at Redditch, were built of excellent stone raised here. In the churchyard, from which a panoramic prospect is obtained, are some schools, prettily situated, rebuilt in 1843 at the expense of Lady Harriet Clive, and partly supported by her ladyship.

Tarleton (St. Mary)

TARLETON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Ormskirk, hundred of Leyland, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 8½ miles (N. by E.) from Ormskirk; containing 1877 inhabitants. This place either gave its name to, or received its name from, an ancient family who had possessions here in the reign of Richard II.; they were succeeded by the Banastres, and the Hesketh family have been for centuries part lords of Tarleton, their present coparcener being George Anthony Legh Keck, Esq. The parish was formerly a chapelry in the parish of Croston. It comprises 5377 acres, whereof 2673 are arable, 2074 pasture, and 630 common or waste; the land is flat, and tolerably fertile, except to the west, where is a large quantity of bog, under which is found oak, elder, and various other kinds of trees. The river Douglas, which passes on the east, was rendered navigable here in 1727. The joint lords hold a court leet annually in October; and a fair for pedlery, under a charter granted by William III., is held on the 23rd and 24th of April: two other fairs granted by the same monarch have fallen into disuse. The living is a rectory, in the gift of the Rev. R. M. Master: the tithes have been commuted for £760, and there is a glebe of 38 acres, with a house. The church, consecrated in 1719, is a plain brick building cased with plaster; the interior is neat, and on the south and west sides is a gallery. A free school, built in 1650, is endowed with £30 per annum; and a national school, accommodating 200 children, is supported. A day school for both sexes has just been erected at the Holmes, by subscription of the landowners, aided by grants from the National Society and the Committee of Council on Education, on ground given by Mr. Keck; it accommodates 170 children, and it is intended to have it licensed for divine service. Some years ago, a labourer, in digging a copse, turned up a small leaden box without a lid, in which were contained about a hundred silver coins, all struck by the same die, and which probably had been secreted at the period of the Scottish rebellion.

Tarnicar.—See Rawcliffe, Upper.

TARNICAR.—See Rawcliffe, Upper.

Tarporley (St. Helen)

TARPORLEY (St. Helen), a market-town and parish, in the union of Nantwich, First division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester; containing, with the townships of Eaton, Rushton, and Utkinton, 2546 inhabitants, of whom 1114 are in Tarporley township, 10½ miles (E. S. E.) from Chester, and 172 (N. W.) from London. This place, which is situated on the road from Chester to London, has a neat appearance, and consists of one long well-paved street, terminated at the southern extremity by the ancient manor-house. The Chester and Crewe railway passes near the town. At the close of the 13th century, a grant of a market and fair was obtained by Hugh de Thorpley, proprietor of the manor; the market is on Thursday, and fairs are held on May 1st, the first Monday after August 24th, and on December 11th. The town was governed by a mayor from 1297 to 1348; two constables are now appointed. The township of Tarporley comprises 1109 acres, of which the prevailing soil is clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 3. 4., and in the joint patronage of Lord Alvanley, the Dean and Chapter of Chester, and Sir P. G. Egerton, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £700, and the glebe comprises 12 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure, of red stone, containing some good monuments to benefactors of the parish. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school, situated in the churchyard, was endowed with £20 per annum by Dame Jane Done, who also left a small bequest for apprenticing children: the school is now united with the Diocesan Board of Education.

Tarraby

TARRABY, a township, in the parish of Stanwix, union of Carlisle, Eskdale ward, E. division of the county of Cumberland, 1¾ mile (N. N. E.) from Carlisle; containing 135 inhabitants.

Tarrant, Crawford.—See Crawford.

TARRANT, CRAWFORD.—See Crawford.

Tarrant-Gunville (St. Mary)

TARRANT-GUNVILLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Cranborne, Blandford division of Dorset, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Blandford; containing 518 inhabitants. It is situated about a mile from the great western road, and comprises by computation 3360a. 1r. 30p., of which 1232 acres are arable, 372 meadow and pasture, 911 down and common, 722 coppice wood, and 70 in shrubberies and plantations. The soil is in general light, resting for the most part on chalk. Many of the females are employed in making shirt-buttons. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 7. 11.; net income, £448; patrons, the Master and Fellows of University College, Oxford. The church, rebuilt, and consecrated in Oct. 1845, is a beautiful structure; the windows of the chancel are of stained glass. Henry VIII. successively assigned the parish, with the advowson, as part of the dowry to bis queens, Catherine Howard and Catharine Parr.

Tarrant-Hinton

TARRANT-HINTON.—See Hinton, Tarrant.

Tarrant-Keynston (All Saints)

TARRANT-KEYNSTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of the county of Dorset, 3½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Blandford; containing 334 inhabitants. It comprises 1962 acres, of which 331 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 8½., and in the gift of the Rev. John Austen: the tithes have been commuted for £383, and the glebe comprises 37 acres. The church stands on the western bank of the small river Tarrant, which falls into the Stour on the southern side of the parish.

Tarrant-Launceston

TARRANT-LAUNCESTON, a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of Dorset, 5¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from the town of Blandford; containing 123 inhabitants. The parish comprises, with Tarrant-Monckton, 3818 acres, of which 119 are common or waste land. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Tarrant-Monckton.

Tarrant-Monckton.—See Monckton.

TARRANT-MONCKTON.—See Monckton.

Tarrant-Rawston (St. Mary)

TARRANT-RAWSTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of Dorset, 4 miles (E. by N.) from Blandford; containing 64 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Tarrant, and comprises by admeasurement an area of 696 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 9. 2., and in the gift of Sir J. W. Smith, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £90, and the glebe comprises 33 acres.

Tarrant-Rushton (St. Mary)

TARRANT-RUSHTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Cranborne, Wimborne division of Dorset, 3¾ miles (E.) from Blandford; containing 184 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1221 acres, of which 30 are common or waste; the soil is chalky. The village is situated in a valley, on the Tarrant rivulet. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 19. 2.; net income, £219; patron, Sir J. W. Smith. Here was an hospital or chantry, dedicated to St. Leonard, and granted to the prior of Christchurch-Twynham in the 7th of Edward III.

Tarretburn

TARRETBURN, a township, in the parish and union of Bellingham, N. W. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 3 miles (N. W.) from Bellingham; containing 247 inhabitants. It includes the hamlets of Greenhaugh and Gatehouse. The houses are built chiefly in the deep and narrow glens formed by the lofty hills of this mountainous district.

Tarring-Neville (St. Mary)

TARRING-NEVILLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newhaven, hundred of Danehill-Horsted, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, 2½ miles (N.) from Newhaven; containing 81 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Ouse, and comprises 896 acres, of which 373 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, united to that of Heighton, in 1660, and valued in the king's books at £7: the tithes have been commuted for 223; the glebe contains 32 acres. The church is a neat structure in the early English style, with a remarkably large chancel.

Tarring, West, (St. Andrew,)

TARRING, WEST, (St. Andrew,) a parish, in the hundred of Tarring, rape of Bramber, W. division of Sussex, 1½ mile (N. W.) from Worthing; containing, with the hamlet of Salvington, 567 inhabitants. This was anciently a place of much importance, and in the time of Offa, King of Mercia, appears to have had a church or monastery, in honour of St. Andrew, some remains of which might be traced in a free chapel that continued here till the reign of Edward III. Henry VI. granted the inhabitants a market, long since discontinued. The living consists of a sinecure rectory valued in the king's books at £22. 13. 4., and a vicarage consolidated with the rectory of Patching, valued at £8. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury. The rectorial tithes have been commuted for £445 and the vicarial for £110. 15.; the rectorial glebe consists of 1¼ acre, and the vicarial of nearly an acre. The church is in the early English style, with later additions, and consists of a nave, aisles, and chancel, with a lofty tower surmounted by a handsome octagonal spire. The ancient parsonage-house was formerly of much greater size, and is thought to have been a manor-house or palace occasionally inhabited by Thomas a Becket, who is said to have brought from Italy the fig-tree from which the whole parish has been abundantly stocked.

Tarrington (St. James)

TARRINGTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Ledbury, hundred of Radlow, county of Hereford, 7 miles (W. N. W.) from Ledbury; containing 546 inhabitants, and comprising 2144 acres. The parish comprises some elevated ground, and is intersected by the road from Ledbury to Hereford. The living is a vicarage, in the gift of E. T. Foley, Esq., valued in the king's books at £5. 0. 2½.: the great tithes have been commuted for £40, and the vicarial for £430; the glebe contains 38½ acres. The church has been enlarged.

Tarset, West

TARSET, WEST, a township, in the parish of Thorneyburn, union of Bellingham, N. W. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Bellingham; containing 173 inhabitants. It is bounded on the east by the rivulet of the same name, which shortly after joins the river Tyne. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £145, and there is a glebe of above 22 acres.

Tarvin (St. Andrew)

TARVIN (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Great Boughton, partly in the Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, but chiefly in the Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester; containing 3585 inhabitants, of whom 1107 are in the township of Tarvin, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Chester. During the great civil war, Tarvin was a considerable military post, often taken and retaken by each party, till September 1644, when it fell into the power of the parliament. The parish comprises by admeasurement 10,060 acres, and includes the townships of Ashton, Bruen-Stapleford Burton, Clotton-Hoofield, Duddon Foulk-Stapletord, Hockenhull-Stapleford, Horton with Peele, Kelsall, and Mouldsworth. The district is agricultural, and is distinguished for its dairies; the population consists chiefly of farmers and labourers. In Tarvin township are 1927 acres, of partly a sand and partly a clay soil. The road from Chester divides at the village into two branches, one leading to Manchester, the other to Nantwich; and the canal from Chester to Nantwich, and the railway from Chester to Crewe, run just within the southern boundary of the parish. There are several quarries of white and red sandstone, for building and other purposes. About the middle of the 16th century, Sir John Savage, lord of the manor, procured a charter for a market and fair, which have been long disused; a cattle-fair, however, is held in spring, and another in autumn.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £19. 11. 0½.; patron, the Bishop of Lichfield; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £600, and there is a good vicarage-house, with an acre and a quarter of glebe. The church, built about 1550, is in the later English style, with a fine tower considerably enriched with sculpture. Though now much mutilated, and most of the windows and ceilings injudiciously modernized, it would, if restored, afford an elegant specimen of ecclesiastical architecture. In addition to the church are three chapels; and the parish contains various places of worship for dissenters, chiefly Wesleyans or their separatists. Tarvin Hall, which stands at the principal entrance into the village, is now occupied by Mr. John Brindley, the successful antagonist of Chartists and Socialists. He has greatly enlarged the buildings, and converted the whole into a scholastic establishment, at present containing upwards of a hundred boys, drawn from all parts of the kingdom, whom he instructs as principal, aided by other masters. A grammar school was founded in 1600 by John Pickering, who endowed it with £200, which were laid out in land now producing an income of £16. The celebrated calligrapher, John Thomason, who died in 1740, was master of this school.

Tasburgh (St. Mary)

TASBURGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Depwade, E. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (N.) from Long Stratton; containing 527 inhabitants. It is situated on the London and Norwich road by way of Bury and Ipswich, and comprises by admeasurement 881 acres, of which 637 are arable, and the remainder meadow and gardens. The surface is in some parts boldly undulated, and views are obtained from the churchyard and its vicinity of an extensive range of beautifully-varied scenery. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of J. Jermy, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £287, and the glebe contains about 3 acres, with a parsonage-house, a handsome residence erected in 1840 by the Rev. Henry E. Preston. The church, which was recently damaged by lightning, is a very ancient edifice, with a circular tower. It stands on a lofty eminence, in the area of a square intrenchment of 24 acres, an advantageous position for the defence of the river Taes, running hence to Caistor. Coins, fibulæ, and other relics of antiquity, have been found; and Gale considers this to be the Roman station Ad Taum.

Tasley

TASLEY, a parish, in the union of Bridgnorth, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, if mile (N. W. by W.) from Bridgnorth; containing 83 inhabitants. This parish, anciently Tasselye, is situated on the road from Bridgnorth to Shrewsbury by way of Wenlock and comprises 1027a. 2r. 34p., of which about 684 acres are arable, 333 pasture, and 10 acres woodland. The soil is in general a white loamy earth, and a sulphureous species of coal is obtained at the northern extremity of the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8., and in the gift of E. F. Acton, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £210, and the glebe comprises 8½ acres. The church was rebuilt in 1841, in the early English style of architecture.

Taston

TASTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Spelsbury, union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford; containing 185 inhabitants.