Tealby - Tempsford

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

310-314

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'Tealby - Tempsford', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 310-314. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51330&strquery=teigngrace Date accessed: 24 September 2014.


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Tealby (All Saints)

TEALBY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Market-Rasen; containing 996 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Market-Rasen to Binbrook, and comprises 2946 acres, of which about half are arable, and the remainder nearly equally divided between pasture and wood. The scenery is singularly beautiful, and the surface furnishes a striking contrast, both in appearance and in its geological contents, to other parts of the county. On the inclosure of the lands in 1792, the moor allotments contained 990 acres, and the wold, and old inclosures, 1956. The soil on the moors is light and sandy, in other places a rich sandy loam and a stiff clay; the surface abounds in rocky eminences of sandstone, and there are numerous quarries of grey stone and chalk. At Tealby is situated the noble mansion, just completed, of the Rt. Hon. C. Tennyson D'Eyncourt, M.P., who is lord of the manor. The river Rase, which rises in the adjacent hills, runs through the village. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 16. 8.; net income, £120; patron, Mr. D'Eyncourt: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1792; the glebe consists of about 12 acres. The church contains portions in the early and decorated English styles. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Tean, Upper

TEAN, UPPER, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Checkley, union of Cheadle, S. division of the hundred of Totmonslow, N. division of the county of Stafford, 2½ miles (S.) from Cheadle; containing about 1300 inhabitants. This is one of three divisions of the parish; it lies on the road from Uttoxeter to Newcastle-under-Lyme, and comprises 1518 acres of land, all dairy-farms. In the neighbourhood are several mansions and elegant villas. The river Tean flows here, and shortly falls into the Dove at Uttoxeter. A manufactory for tape, supposed to be the most extensive in Europe, was established here in 1748, at which, and in the adjoining bleach-grounds, several hundred persons find employment. Fairs are held on Easter-Tuesday and Nov. 10th. The church, dedicated to Christ, and erected on a site given by the late Thomas Hutchinson, Esq., was consecrated on the 10th July, 1843; it is a neat building, with a campanile tower, and contains 490 sittings, all free. The cost, £1576, was defrayed by subscription, aided by a gift of £200 from the Incorporated Society. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £50 per annum out of the tithes; patron, the Rector of Checkley: there is a parsonage-house. The Independents and Wesleyans have places of worship. Attached to the church is a school, and a daily school is supported by the proprietors of the works here.

Teath, St.

TEATH, ST., a parish, in the union of Camelford, hundred of Trigg, E. division of Cornwall, 3 miles (S. W. by W.) from Camelford; containing 1719 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the Bristol Channel, and intersected by the great road running to the north; it comprises by computation 4842 acres, whereof 220 are common or waste. In the parish are two large slate-quarries, of which that of Delabole is of great value. Here is also a lead-mine, which was formerly much more worked than it is at present, and in which an unusual proportion of silver has been found. A fair is held on the first Tuesday in July. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12; patron, the Bishop of Exeter; impropriator, E. P. Lyon, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £396, and the vicarial for £240; the glebe contains 30 acres of land, of indifferent quality. The church was once collegiate for two prebendaries, or portionists. There are places of worship for Bryanites and Wesleyans. Remains of ancient British encampments are to be seen.

Tebay

TEBAY, a township, in the parish of Orton, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 2½ miles (S.) from Orton; containing 368 inhabitants. The township comprises 6832 acres, of which 4100 are common or waste. It is a mountainous district, divided into High End and Low End; and contains an ancient village, situated at the junction of the Birbeck and Lune rivulets, on the road from Kendal to Kirkby-Stephen. The Lune is crossed by the Lancaster and Carlisle railway twice near Lune Bridge, where the station has been placed for Tebay, Orton, and Kirkby-Stephen; the Birbeck stream is next crossed by a viaduct similar to that at Borrow Bridge, and here the ascent commences to Shap Fells, the highest point on the line. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £91. 12. 3; the rectorial tithes belong to the landowners. A free grammar school was endowed in 1672, by Robert Adamson, with land now producing about £40 per annum. Two large mounds in the vicinity, called Castle How, which command the pass by the river Lune, are Roman fortifications.

Tebworth

TEBWORTH, a hamlet, in the parish of Chalgrave, union of Woburn, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford; containing 408 inhabitants.

Tedburn (St. Mary)

TEDBURN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of West Wonford, Crockernwell and S. divisions of Devon, 4½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Crediton; containing 867 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Exeter to Oakhampton, and comprises 3612 acres, of which 351 are common or waste. A cattle-fair is held on the Monday before Michaelmas-day. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 3., and in the gift of the Rev. Charles Burne: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe comprises 38½ acres. At Hackworthy, in the parish, was formerly a chapel of ease.

Teddington (St. Mary)

TEDDINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Kingston, hundred of Spelthorne, county of Middlesex, 11 miles (S. W. by W.) from London; containing 1199 inhabitants, and comprising 1052 acres by admeasurement. The village stands on the western bank of the Thames, on the road from London, through Isleworth, to Hampton Court. Bushy Park, the usual country residence of His late Majesty William IV. and his queen Adelaide, before their accession to the throne, is partly in the parish. Here are the wax-bleaching grounds and candle-manufactory of Messrs. Barclay, the largest and most complete establishment of the kind in the kingdom, where during the summer months, nearly four acres of ground are covered with wax, of which about 200,0001b. are annually bleached, and in winter formed into candles by hand. Connected with this factory is a very extensive one of spermaceti, chiefly carried on in Leicester-square. The living is a donative curacy; net income £91; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Bradford: the tithes were commuted for land in 1799. The church, which has been repewed, is principally in the later English style, and contains the remains of Sir Orlando Bridgeman, who died in 1674, and of Dr. Stephen Hall, clerk of the closet to the Princess of Wales (mother of George III.), and 51 years minister of the parish, to which he was a liberal benefactor. Her Majesty the Queen Dowager lately presented £100 towards the erection of a parsonage-house. Twelve girls are instructed for £20 a year, the rent of cottages and lands purchased with £40 left by Dorothy Bridgeman in 1694, and with a smaller sum from the parish funds. There is also a national school.

Teddington

TEDDINGTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Overbury, union of Tewkesbury, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Tewkesbury; containing 115 inhabitants, and comprising 738 acres. The chapel is dedicated to St. Nicholas, and contains a fine arch under the tower.

Tedstone-Delamere (St. James)

TEDSTONE-DELAMERE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 4½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Bromyard; containing 207 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1669 acres; the surface is hilly, and the soil clay. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £238; patrons, the Principal and Fellows of Brasenose College, Oxford. Here is a petrifying spring which has excited great curiosity.

Tedstone-Wafer

TEDSTONE-WAFER, a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 3¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Bromyard; containing 92 inhabitants. It comprises 800 acres: limestone abounds in the neighbourhood. The living is a rectory, united to that of Edvin-Loach, and valued in the king's books at £1. 10.: the tithes have been commuted for £80. and the glebe comprises 2 acres.

Teeton

TEETON, a hamlet, in the parish of Rayensthorpe, union of Brixworth, hundred of Newbottle-Grove, S. division of the county of Northampton, 7¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Northampton; containing 95 inhabitants, and consisting of 680 acres.

Teffont-Evias

TEFFONT-EVIAS, a parish, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Dunworth, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 6½ miles (W.) from Wilton; containing 149 inhabitants. It comprises about 700 acres. The soil in some parts is a strong clay, and in others a rich loam suited to every kind of grain. The surface is hilly, and the scenery derives effect from the river Nadder, and from another stream, beautifully clear, which rises in the chalk hills near the adjoining village of Teffont Magna, and forms a lake of two acres in the grounds of the lord of the manor. Here is a fine freestone quarry with some very extensive excavations, from which the stone used in building Salisbury cathedral was taken. The manor-house, a handsome structure in the later English style, greatly enlarged and improved in the present century, was the birthplace of Henry, Earl of Marlborough, lord high treasurer and chancellor of England in the time of James II. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8; present net income, £148 per annum; patron, Mrs. Mayne: there is a parsonagehouse, with a glebe of about 28 acres. The church has been rebuilt.

Teffont Magna

TEFFONT MAGNA, a parish, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Warminster, locally in the hundred of Dunworth, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 5¼ (E.) from Hindon; containing 264 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Dinton.

Teigh (Holy Trinity)

TEIGH (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Alstoe, county of Rutland, 5 miles (N.) from Oakham; containing 235 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1400 acres, and produces a material resembling ironstone, which is quarried for the roads: the Melton and Oakham canal passes through it. Here is a strong petrifying spring; and fossil fish have been found in the blue rock. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 2. 11.; net income, £349; patron, the Earl of Harborough: there is a parsonage-house, with a glebe of about 60 acres. The church is a small neat edifice.

Teigngrace (St. Mary)

TEIGNGRACE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newton-Abbott, hundred of Teignbridge, Teignbridge and S. divisions of Devon, 2¼ miles (N. by W.) from Newton-Bushell; containing 180 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Exeter to Plymouth, and on the banks of the river Teign. The Stover canal and tramway, constructed here by the Templer family, facilitate the exportation of the potters'-clay found in the neighbourhood, and of the granite from the extensive quarries near Haytor, which belong to the Duke of Somerset. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 9. 4½., and in the gift of the Duke: the tithes have been commuted for £170, and the gldbe comprises 40 acres. The church is a handsome edifice, surmounted by a spire, and furnished with an excellent organ. It was built in 1787, by J. and G. Templer, Esqrs., and the Rev. John Templer, brothers; and among other monuments of that family, contains one to the memory of Charles Templer, who perished in the wreck of the Halsewell, East Indiaman, on the Dorsetshire coast, in 1786. About £20 per annum, derived from land, are applied partly to the support of the inmates of 5 almshouses lately built, and partly to the support of a parochial school.

Teignholt

TEIGNHOLT, a hamlet, in the parish of DrewsTeignton, union of Oakhampton, hundred of Wonford, Crockernwell and S. divisions of the county of Devon; containing 181 inhabitants.

Teignmouth

TEIGNMOUTH, a sea-port and market-town, comprising two parishes, called East and West, in the union of Newton-Abbott, hundred of Exminster, Teignbridge and S. divisions of Devon, 15 miles (S. by E.) from Exeter, and 187¾ (W. S. W.) from London; containing 4459 inhabitants, of whom 2883 are in West Teignmouth. This is stated to have been the first landing-place of the Danes, who, having slain the governor, were encouraged by this omen of success to pursue their warlike purposes throughout the island. The town has been twice destroyed by fire, first by a French pirate, in 1340, and subsequently, on July 26th, 1690, when the French, having effected a landing, proceeded to ransack the churches, and burnt 116 houses, with a number of ships and small craft lying in the harbour. In commemoration of this calamitous event, one of the streets still retains the appellation of French-street; and the original brief granted for the relief of the sufferers is now in the possession of the Jordan family. Alarmed at the threat of a similar attack, in 1744, the inhabitants obtained permission to erect a small fort on the beach of East Teignmouth, and petitioned the admiralty for the requisite supply of ordnance. In Camden's time the eastern town was called Teignmouth-Regis, and the other Teignmouth-Episcopi, the manor of the latter having belonged to the see of Exeter until alienated by Bishop Vesey.

The town is situated, as its name implies, on the navigable river Teign at its influx into the sea, and occupies a gentle declivity at the foot of a chain of hills, by which it is sheltered on the north and west. The two parts are separated by a small rivulet called the Tame. East Teignmouth, which is the more modern, is almost entirely appropriated as a watering-place, in which respect it is considered equal, if not superior, in fashionable repute to any on the Devonshire coast. Its situation is beautiful, and in the vicinity are prospects, particularly from Little Haldon, of great and deserved celebrity; the cliffs are of a reddish colour, and of considerable height, and at the southern side of the river's mouth is a singular elevation called the Ness. On the strand fronting the sea are carriage-drives, promenades, and an extensive lawn. The public rooms, built by subscription, form the centre of a crescent, and comprise spacious assembly-rooms, with apartments for refreshments cards, and billiards; the façade of the building is decorated with an Ionic portico over a Doric colonnade. There are also a public library, and some bathing establishments. A regatta takes place about the month of August.

West Teignmouth is the port and principal seat of business. It had risen to some importance at an early period, having sent members to a great council in the reign of Edward I., and contributed seven ships, with 120 men, towards the expedition against Calais, in 1347. The town, with its quay and dockyard, situated on the curve formed by the sudden expansion of the river, is irregularly built; the principal streets are neatly paved, and lighted with gas. A post-road through it from Exeter to Torquay is continued by a modern bridge over the Teign, said to be the longest in England, and which is constructed of wood and iron, with a drawbridge at one end for the passage of vessels. A quay was formed in 1820, by G. Templer, Esq.; and in a small dockyard here, sloops of war and vessels of upwards of 200 tons' burthen have been built. The harbour is safe and commodious, though somewhat difficult to enter, on account of a moveable bar or sand bank, which shifts with the wind. In the middle of the last century, a large number of vessels, of from 50 to 200 tons' burthen each, were employed in the trade with Newfoundland, and some business of this description is still carried on; coal and culm are imported in large quantities, and the home fishery at present occupies a considerable number of the inhabitants. By means of a tramroad and a canal, which latter joins the Teign at Newton-Abbott, and is navigable thence to the sea at Teignmouth, a communication has been effected with the granite-quarries at Haytor and the clay-pits of Bovey, which greatly facilitates the export of granite and pipe and potters' clay. The Teignmouth and Exeter portion of the South Devon railway was opened in May 1846.

A grant of a market and a fair was obtained in the reign of Henry III., by the Dean and Chapter of Exeter, for East Teignmouth, where is a commodious markethouse, which belongs to the Earl of Devon, lord of the manor. The market is on Saturday, principally for provisions; and fairs are held on the third Tuesday in January, the last Tuesday in February, and the last Tuesday in September. The government of West Teignmouth is vested in a portreeve, who is annually elected by a jury of twelve, at a court leet and baron held by Lord Clifford, lord of the manor; at which court also a townclerk, four constables, two bailiffs, and other officers are appointed. In East Teignmouth, a reeve and two constables are elected by the court there, and two constables by the parish. East Teignmouth comprises 530a. 3r. 1p.: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £127; patron, the Vicar of Dawlish; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Exeter: the great tithes have been commuted for £50, and those of the perpetual curate for £90. The church, which is dedicated to St. Michael, was almost rebuilt in 1821. The living of West Teignmouth is a vicarage, in the gift of the Incumbent of Bishop's-Teignton: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £13, and the vicarial for £157. The church, which is dedicated to St. James, is a spacious modern octagonal structure, with a tower at the west side, and surmounted in the centre by a lantern. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Calvinistic Methodists. Teignmouth confers the title of Baron on the family of Shore.

Teignton, Bishop's (St. John the Baptist)

TEIGNTON, BISHOP'S (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Newton-Abbott, hundred of Exminster, Teignbridge and S. divisions of Devon, 1¾ mile (W. by N.) from West Teignmouth; containing 992 inhabitants. This place appears to have taken its name from a sanctuary or asylum built here by Grandison, Bishop of Exeter, and which was invested with great privileges and immunities, and considered as inviolable. The bishop also erected a house with a chapel, "presaging what might in future time ensue to the great estate of the clergy, that his successors might have a place to lean and lay their heads unto if haply their temporalities should be seized:" the remains are still to be seen. The parish is bounded by the river Teign, and comprises 4724 acres, the whole being corn and pasture land with the exception of 381 acres which are common or waste: the surface is hilly; the grounds are well cultivated. Here are some extensive quarries affording compact blocks of various-coloured marble. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £25. 8. 10.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. John Comyns. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £496; and the vicarial for £215. 7., with a glebe of 8 acres. The church, which has been lately renovated and repewed, is principally in the Norman style, with an enriched western doorway in excellent preservation; near it are the remains of an ancient chapel, and there was formerly a chapel at Venn, in the parish.

Teignton, Drews (Holy Trinity)

TEIGNTON, DREWS (HOLY TRINITY), a parish, in the union of Oakhampton, hundred of Wonford, Crockernwell and S. divisions of Devon, 11 miles (E. S. E.) from Oakhampton; containing, with the hamlet of Teignholt, 1315 inhabitants. The name is supposed to signify "the Druids' Town on the Teign." That river pursues its rapid course on the south, through scenery of the wildest description, and is crossed by Fingle bridge, in a romantic valley. The parish comprises 6937a. 3r. 25p., whereof 1349 acres are common or waste; it contains two quarries, the produce of which is chiefly applied to agricultural purposes. A fair is held at Candlemas, and another in Trinity-week. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £40. 13. 4.; net income, £776; patrons, the Ponsford family. Certain impropriate tithes have been commuted for £614. 17.; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 440½ acres. The church is an ancient and interesting structure, with a beautiful window of stained glass at the east end, and a fine Norman font. On the Shilston estate is a cromlech consisting of three supporting stones, each about six feet and a half high, with a covering stone twelve feet long and nine feet across the widest part. Upon the bank of the Teign is one of the celebrated logan, or rocking, stones; and at Preston-Bury are the remains of an encampment.

Teignton, King's (St. Michael)

TEIGNTON, KING'S (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Newton-Abbott, hundred of Teignbridge, Teignbridge and S. divisions of Devon, 2 miles (N. E. by N.) from Newton-Bushell; containing 1498 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the navigable river Teign, and comprises 3278 acres, of which 538 are common or waste. In the neighbourhood are large beds of pipe and potters' clay, of very superior quality; and limestone is quarried. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of Highweek annexed, valued in the king's books at £28. 13. 9.; patron, the Bishop of Exeter. The great tithes have been commuted for £252. 10., with a glebe of 3 acres; and the vicarial for £311, with 12½ acres. The church, which was enlarged in 1824, contains a monument with a singular epitaph on Richard Adlam, vicar in 1669. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; and two schools partly supported by the vicar. Theophilus Gale, a learned nonconformist divine, was born here in 1628.

Tellisford (All Saints)

TELLISFORD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Frome, hundred of Wellow, E. division of Somerset, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Frome; containing 150 inhabitants. It is separated from Wiltshire by the river Frome, and comprises 717a. 2r., of which 278 acres are arable, 356 meadow and pasture, 45 park land, and 38 wood. About a third part of the village was destroyed by fire in 1785. The river is crossed by a bridge here. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 1. 0½., and in the gift of the Rev. C. W. Baker: the tithes have been commuted for £150, and there is a parsonage-house, with a glebe of 59 acres.

Telscombe (St. Lawrence)

TELSCOMBE (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Newhaven, hundred of Holmstrow, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 5 miles (S. by W.) from Lewes; containing 167 inhabitants. The road from Brighton to Newhaven passes through the parish, and the English Channel bounds it on the south. The village is in a secluded valley, and on the Downs are the remains of an ancient encampment, supposed to be Roman. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4.; net income, £231; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. Hutchins. The church is a small structure, principally in the Norman style; the north aisle is separated from the nave by three circular arches.

Temple

TEMPLE, a parish, in the union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, E. division of Cornwall, 6¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Bodmin; containing 37 inhabitants. It comprises 843 acres, of which 204 are common or waste. The extensive moors between Bodmin and Launcestou take their name from this parish, in which they are partly situated. The living is a donative, in the patronage of Sir B. Wrey, Bart.; net income, £21. The church is quite dilapidated.

Temple-Brewer

TEMPLE-BREWER, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Sleaford, wapentake of Flaxwell, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 6¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Sleaford; containing 94 inhabitants. A preceptory of Knights Templars was founded here before 1185, which afterwards belonged to the Hospitallers, and at the Dissolution was valued at £184. 6. 8.

Temple-Grafton.—See Grafton, Temple.

TEMPLE-GRAFTON.—See Grafton, Temple.— And other places having a similar distinguishing prefix will be found under the proper name.

Temple-Hall.—See Wellesborough.

TEMPLE-HALL.—See Wellesborough.

Temple-Newsom

TEMPLE NEWSOM, a township, in the parish of Whitkirk, Lower division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Leeds; containing 1428 inhabitants. This place derives the prefix to its name from the Knights Templars, who had a preceptory here, which, at the suppression of their order in 1311, was granted to Sir John D'Arcy, whose descendant, Thomas, Lord D'Arcy, was beheaded in the reign of Henry VIII. for joining the "Pilgrims of Grace." The forfeited manor was bestowed on the Earl of Lenox, father of Lord Darnley, the husband of Mary, Queen of Scots; and, upon the earl's death, came to his grandson James I., by whom it was given to the Duke of Richmond, who sold it to Sir Arthur Ingram. Sir Arthur erected the present mansion, the seat of H. C. Meynell Ingram, Esq., which is surrounded by a magnificent park.

Templeton (St. Margaret)

TEMPLETON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, hundred of Witheridge, Collumpton and N. divisions of Devon, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Tiverton; containing 275 inhabitants. This parish belonged to the Knights Templars, and afterwards to the Hospitallers of St. John. It is intersected by the old road from Tiverton to Witheridge, and comprises 1588 acres, of which 129 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 15.; net income, £162 per annum; patron, Sir W. T. Pole, Bart. There is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains about 70 acres.

Tempsford (St. Peter)

TEMPSFORD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Biggleswade, county of Bedford, 5 miles (S. by W.) from St. Neot's; containing 561 inhabitants. This place was occupied by the Danes before 921, when they were expelled by the Saxons; they returned in 1010, and reduced it to ashes. The parish comprises 1984 acres. The village is situated on the river Ivel, which falls into the Ouse as it passes along the western boundary of the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24, and has a net income of £227; it is in the patronage of the Crown. The tithes have been commuted for land under an inclosure act. The church was given to the convent of St. Neot's, by Robert de Carun, in 1129, upon his grandson Anselm taking the monastic habit there. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.



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