Thockrington - Thormanby

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

328-330

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'Thockrington - Thormanby', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 328-330. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51334 Date accessed: 30 October 2014.


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Thockrington

THOCKRINGTON, a parish, in the union of Bellingham, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland; containing, with the townships of Little Bavington, Cary-Coats, and Sweethope, 193 inhabitants, of whom 42 are in Thockrington township, 10½ miles (N. by E.) from Hexham. This parish, which is bounded on the west by the Roman Watling-street, comprises 6814 acres, and in its more elevated parts commands extensive views over a well cultivated country. Here are some quarries, the produce of which is used for building, and for making lime; a very excellent coalmine is in operation, and in the parish is also a rich lead-mine, but not at present worked. The small hamlet which is the head of the parish is said to have been once a good village containing numerous farmers. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rev. Sir Robert Affleck (the impropriator), with a net income of £48: the glebe is situated near East Woodburn, upon the banks of the Rede, and consists of 155 acres. The church is a very ancient edifice, standing on a lofty eminence. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. A stone about 5½ feet long, and neatly chiselled at one end, supposed to have been used by the Romans, was found on the Watling-street here, two feet below the surface, by some workmen, in 1839. About 100 yards to the south of the spot, Mr. Forster, M. P., met about twenty gentlemen on the 6th of October, 1715, and after leading them to some rising ground adjacent, and being joined by the Earl of Derwentwater with his servants and attendants all mounted and well armed, harangued them on the advantages of raising Prince James Stuart to the throne. W. G. Shafto, Esq., the proprietor of the Cary-Coats estate, has caused the stone discovered on the Watling-street to be set up in the place where Mr. Forster addressed his followers.

Tholthorp

THOLTHORP, a township, in the parish of Alne, union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. W.) from Easingwould; containing 300 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation about 3000 acres: the village is situated on the small river Linton, and on the western side of the Forest of Galtres. The tithes were commuted for land and an annual money payment in 1800.

Thomas-Close

THOMAS-CLOSE, a township, in the parish of Hutton-in-the-Forest, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 8¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Penrith; containing 99 inhabitants.

Thomas, St., the Apostle

THOMAS, ST., THE APOSTLE, a parish, in the union and parliamentary borough of Launceston, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall; containing, with the hamlet of St. Thomas Street, 1125 inhabitants, of whom 366 are in the hamlet of St. Thomas the Apostle. Building-stone is quarried, and manganese is partially worked. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £83; patrons, the Inhabitants. The great tithes of the parish of St. Clether were purchased for the curacy with money from Queen Anne's Bounty, and the tithes upon certain fields and orchards in this parish also belong to it. A priory was founded here by Bishop Warlewast, who, in 1126, removed to it an establishment of secular canons which had previously existed at St. Stephen's: upon the Dissolution its revenue was estimated at £354. 0. 11. At Kestelwood are vestiges of ancient earthworks.

Thomas, St., the Apostle

THOMAS, ST., THE APOSTLE, a parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Wonford, Wonford and S. divisions of Devon, ½ a mile (S. by W.) from Exeter; containing, with the chapelry of Oldridge, 4301 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north-east by the river Exe, from which the Exeter canal passes to the south. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 2. 8½., and in the patronage of James W. Buller, Esq., with a net income of £237: the tithes, which have been commuted for £700, wholly belong to Mr. Buller, who pays a stipend to the incumbent. The church, erected in 1412, and enlarged in 1829, is in the later English style, and contains 1000 sittings, 250 of which are free. At Oldridge is a separate incumbency, and a chapel has been erected at the village of Exwick. The poor-law union comprises 49 parishes or places, and has a population of 47,105. A small priory of Black canons, a cell to that of Plympton, was founded in the time of Henry III., in honour of the Blessed Virgin; it stood partly in this parish, and partly in that of Alphington.

Thomley

THOMLEY, a hamlet, in the parish of Waterperry, union of Thame, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford; containing 13 inhabitants.

Thompson (St. Martin)

THOMPSON (St. Martin), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wayland, W. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Watton; containing 490 inhabitants, and comprising about 1946 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £49; patron and impropriator, H. D. Emsworth, Esq. The church is in the early and decorated English styles, with a lofty square embattled tower, and a south transept; on the south side of the chancel are three sedilia of stone, and a piscina of elegant design. Nineteen acres of land, producing £30 per annum, have been allotted to the poor. Sir Thomas de Shardelow, Knt., and his brother, about 1349 founded a chantry or college in honour of the Blessed Virgin and All Saints, for a master and five chaplains, whose revenue, at the Dissolution, was valued at £52. 15. 7.: the remains have been converted into a farmhouse.

Thompson's-Wall.—See Couldsmouth.

THOMPSON'S-WALL.—See Couldsmouth.

Thompson (St. Andrew)

THOMPSON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Coombs-Ditch, Blandford division of Dorset, 6½ miles (S. by E.) from Blandford; containing 48 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 8. 9., and in the gift of William John Bankes, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £84, and the glebe comprises about an acre. The church, a small brick edifice, circular at the east end, was rebuilt by Archbishop Wake.

Thong, Nether

THONG, NETHER, a township, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 5¼ miles (S. by W.) from Huddersfield; containing 1156 inhabitants. It comprises an area of about 875 acres, of which the soil is fertile, and in good cultivation; the village is pleasantly situated on an acclivity. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the woollen manufacture. A district church, dedicated to All Saints, was erected in 1830, at an expense of £2869, of which £2500 were granted by the Parliamentary Commissioners, and the remainder raised by subscription; it is a neat structure in the early English style, with a campanile turret, and contains 700 sittings, of which 320 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Almondbury, with a net income of £150; impropriators, the Governors of Clitheroe school.

Thong, Upper

THONG, UPPER, an ecclesiastical parish, and a township, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 6¼ miles (S.) from Huddersfield; containing 2352 inhabitants. The township is 3½ miles in length and one mile in breadth, and comprises 3045a. 1r. 10p., the surface rising into bold hills, with some moorland on the heights. It includes part of the village of Holmfirth, which is chiefly in the parish of Kirk-Burton. The river Holm, and the Manchester and Huddersfield road, pass through; and here is a branch railway in connexion with the Huddersfield and Sheffield line. The village of Upper Thong is seated on an eminence, is well built, and contains many modern houses; the inhabitants are chiefly employed in the manufacture of woollen goods. The township was constituted an ecclesiastical district in January 1846, under the act 6th and 7th Victoria, cap. 37, and was formed into a parish on the consecration of its church, of which the first stone was laid in September 1846. The edifice is in the pointed style, consisting of a nave, chancel, transepts, and a tower on the south side; it contains about 700 sittings, and the cost, including the site, was about £4000. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon, alternately; net income, £150. There are places of worship for Independents and Methodists. The water of a mineral spring here, recently opened, is somewhat similar in odour to the celebrated Harrogate sulphur water: the township also contains a chalybeate spring.

Thoralby

THORALBY, a township, in the parish of Aysgarth, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 8½ miles (W. by S.) from Middleham; containing 299 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 3000 acres of land, rising into lofty moorland fells; the village lies on the west side of Bishop's-dale. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £69, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Thoresby, North (St. Helen)

THORESBY, NORTH (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Louth, wapentake of Bradley-Haverstoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 8 miles (N. by W.) from Louth; containing 623 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 2485 acres, of which 480 are common or waste. The road from Louth to Grimsby runs along its western extremity; and the Louth canal passes about 2½ miles from the village, for a short distance through the eastern part of the parish. A pleasure-fair is held on Holy-Thursday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24. 10. 10., and in the gift of the Rev. H. Bassett: the tithes have been commuted for £441. 13., and the glebe contains 54a. 3r. 37p., with a house, recently built. The church is very ancient, with a chancel of later date. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists. Dr. Robert Mapletoft in 1676 bequeathed 47 acres of land, now producing £30 per annum, for the endowment of a free school; and £17 a year, from Mrs. F. Smith's charity, are distributed among the poor.

Thoresby, South (St. Andrew)

THORESBY, SOUTH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Louth, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (W. by N.) from Alford; containing 138 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 906 acres. The substratum is chiefly limestone, which is quarried for burning into lime; and there are some pits of good gravel, in which fossil remains of the nautilus are found. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 6½., and in the patronage of the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, with a net income of £214; the glebe comprises 22½ acres. The church is a neat structure of brick, built in 1738.

Thoresthorpe

THORESTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Saleby, union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, ¾ of a mile (N. N. E.) from Alford; containing 53 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1803.

Thoresway (St. Mary)

THORESWAY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. E.) from Caistor; containing 189 inhabitants. This place derives its name from Thor, a Scandinavian deity who presided over desolate parts. It was formerly included in the duchy of Lancaster, and was given in 1644 by Charles I. to Sir John Colepeper, whom that king created a baron, of Thoresway, as a reward for his services in the royal cause, and whose descendants continued to bear the title till 1725, when the fourth baron died without issue. A great portion of the surface was a rabbit-warren, but this has been brought into an excellent state of cultivation by the application of bone manure, and the parish now comprises 2845 acres of good land, of which 2645 are arable, 130 pasture, and 70 plantation. The surface is hilly; the village is situated in a picturesque valley of the Wolds. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 10. 10., and in the gift of the Crown, with a net income of £493, derived from 686 acres of land assigned at the inclosure in lieu of tithes: a glebe-house was erected in 1840. The church is a small edifice.

Thorganby (All Saints)

THORGANBY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Caistor; containing 116 inhabitants. It comprises 1400a. 3r. 9p., of which four-fifths are arable, and the rest grass and plantations. The surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque: the soil is chalky, producing barley, wheat, and oats; and limestone is procured for building purposes, and for burning into lime as manure. Thorganby Hall, formerly the seat of the Willoughbys, is an ancient and handsome stone mansion, situated in well-wooded grounds commanding fine prospects. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 0. 10., and in the gift of the Earl of Yarborough, who is lord of the manor and owner of the entire parish; the tithes have been commuted for £85. The church is a small structure, recently improved. Six skeletons, with ancient swords and spears near them, were found in 1832.

Thorganby (St. Elen)

THORGANBY (St. Elen), a parish, in the union of York, wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, E. riding of York, 9¾ miles (S. E.) from York; containing, with the township of West Cottingwith, 373 inhabitants. This place, which is of some antiquity, for a considerable period consisted only of three houses. Of these one was the Benedictine priory of Thicket, founded by Roger Fitz-Roger in the reign of Richard I., and which continued to flourish till the Dissolution, when its revenue was returned at £23. 12. 2. The priory, together with the conventual lands, was granted in the 33rd of Henry VIII. to John Aske, to whose family the patronage or foundership had descended from the Hayes. There are but few remains of the ancient buildings; in 1822 a handsome mansion of brick, called Thicket Priory, was erected on the site. The parish comprises 3039a. 2r. 22p., of which about 2430 acres are arable, 557 meadow and pasture, and 52 woodland and plantations. The surface is generally flat, but the scenery, which is enriched with wood, is of pleasing character; the soil is partly clay and partly a sandy loam, in good cultivation. The village is situated near the river Derwent. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £50; patron and impropriator, the Rev. J. Dunnington Jefferson. The church, an ancient structure in the Norman style, is in a perfect state of repair. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A parochial school was founded in 1733, by Thomas Dunnington, Esq., who bequeathed a house and garden for it, with an endowment in money, which was augmented with £10. 10. per annum by Robert Jefferson, Esq., for the instruction of eight additional children.

Thorington (St. Peter)

THORINGTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 4 miles (S. E.) from Halesworth; containing 157 inhabitants. It comprises about 1286 acres; the surface is flat, and the soil runs through several varieties. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7, and in the gift of Lieut.-Colonel Bence, who resides here: the tithes have been commuted for £280, and the glebe contains 11 acres. The church has a round tower, and several Norman details.

Thorlby, with Stirton.—See Stirton.

THORLBY, with Stirton.—See Stirton.

Thorley (St. James)

THORLEY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Bishop-Stortford, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford, 2½ miles (S. S. W.) from Bishop-Stortford; containing 396 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 13. 4.; patron, the Bishop of London: the tithes have been commuted for £470, and the glebe consists of 50 acres. The church has an embattled tower surmounted by a lofty spire, and is entered on the south by a Norman doorway.

Thorley (St. Mary)

THORLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the liberty of West Medina, Isle of Wight division of the county of Southampton, 1 mile (E. S. E.) from Yarmouth; containing 163 inhabitants. It comprises 1518 acres, of which 1014 are arable, 359 meadow and pasture, 50 down, and 78 wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 9.; patron, the Rev. James Penfold. The great tithes have been commuted for £257, and the small for £110: the vicar has a glebe of 16 acres. The church was erected by Amicia, Countess of Devon, who gave it to the priory of Christchurch, by which establishment it was retained till the Dissolution.

Thormanby (St. Mary)

THORMANBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 4¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Easingwould; containing 138 inhabitants. It comprises about 900 acres, and is partly the property of Viscount Downe: the village is intersected by the road from Easingwould to Thirsk, and stands about half a mile south-east of Birdforth. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 2. 11., and in the patronage of Viscount Downe: the tithes have been commuted for £246; there are 38½ acres of glebe.