Thorpe-Abbots - Thoydon, Mount

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

343-346

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'Thorpe-Abbots - Thoydon, Mount', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 343-346. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51339 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Thorpe-Abbots (All Saints)

THORPE-ABBOTS (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Depwade, hundred of Earsham, E. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (E.) from Scole; containing 281 inhabitants, and comprising 1123 acres. This parish is bounded on the south by the river Waveney, which separates it from the county of Suffolk; and the road from Bury to Yarmouth passes through it. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £305; patron, J. P. Reade, Esq. The glebe contains about 16 acres, and there is a good glebehouse erected in 1840, by the Rev. W. Wallace. The church is chiefly in the later style.

Thorpe-Achurch (St. John the Baptist)

THORPE-ACHURCH (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Navisford, N. division of the county of Northampton, 4¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Thrapston; containing 218 inhabitants. It is situated on the right bank of the river Nene, and comprises 1495 acres. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Lilford annexed, valued in the king's books at £14. 16. 3.; net income, £420; patron, Lord Lilford. The tithes were commuted for land in 1772, at which time an allotment, now let for £13. 10. per annum, was awarded for parochial purposes.

Thorpe-Arnold (St. Mary)

THORPE-ARNOLD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 1½ mile (E. N. E.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 134 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Melton-Mowbray to Grantham, and consists of 1740 acres, of which about onefifth is arable, and the remainder pasture; the soil in general is a cold clayey earth, but in some parts rich grazing land. The small river Eye and the Melton and Oakham canal run through the parish. The living is a vicarage, with the chapelry of Brentingby annexed, valued in the king's books at £6. 17. 8½ and in the gift of the Duke of Rutland: the glebe comprises 23 acres.

Thorpe, Bishop's (St. Andrew)

THORPE, BISHOP'S (St. Andrew), a parish, partly in the county of the city of Norwich, but chiefly in the hundred and union of Blofield, E. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (E.) from Norwich; containing 2197 inhabitants, of whom 1156 are in the county of the city. The parish comprises 2592a. 2r. 11p., of which 1520 acres are arable, 831 meadow, pasture, and common, 174 woodland, and 67 in roads and waste. The village is beautifully situated on the western and southern acclivities of a hill whose base is washed by the navigable rivers Wensum and Yare, which, uniting their streams within the parish, flow together to Yarmouth: the vicinity is ornamented with rich plantations, and interspersed with handsome villas occupied by opulent Norwich citizens. The Norwich and Yarmouth railway passes through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of the Rev. A. Herring: the tithes have been commuted for £612, and the glebe comprises 26 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains some good monuments. Here is a place of worship for dissenters; also a free school, founded in 1587 by subscription, and augmented with forty acres of land by the Rev. Samuel Chapman in 1700. About 61 acres of land were allotted to the poor for fuel, at the time of the inclosure; and there are a few small bequests for distribution. On a hill above Bishopgate Bridge are some remains of a chapel dedicated to St. Michael, which is also called Kett's Castle, from the rebels under that leader having encamped near it. In the parish are likewise vestiges of a convent dedicated to St. Leonard, which occupied an area of eight acres, inclosed with walls of great thickness. The county lunatic asylum is situated here.

Thorpe-Brantingham

THORPE-BRANTINGHAM, a township, in the parish of Brantingham, union of Beverley, HunsleyBeacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 3 miles (S. S. W.) from North Cave; containing 112 inhabitants, and comprising about 800 acres. The village is very small. Near it, situated on a bold eminence, is the handsome mansion of ThorpeBrantingham House.

Thorpe-Bulmer

THORPE-BULMER, a township, in the parish of Hart, union of Stockton, S. division of Easington ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 3 miles (W. N. W.) from Hartlepool; containing 21 inhabitants. This township derives the adjunct to its name from the family of Bulmer, one of whom, Sir John Bulmer, was attainted in the reign of Henry VIII. It comprises by measurement 827 acres, of which 88 are woodland, 66 common or waste, and the remainder arable and pasture; the soil is of a clayey quality, in some parts very productive, and the scenery in general is beautiful. Hesleton dene forms the northern boundary, where the banks are covered with hesles and forest-trees. The three farms of Thorpe-Bulmer, Middle-Thorpe, and Crimdon are in the township; and the Hartlepool railway passes here, through an immense excavation called the Crimdon cut. The tithes have been commuted for £70, payable to the vicar of Hart.

Thorpe-By-Ixworth (All Saints)

THORPE-BY-IXWORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Thinghoe, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, ½ a mile (N. W. by N.) from Ixworth: containing 142 inhabitants. The manor was part of the endowment of Ixworth Priory, and at the Dissolution was granted, with the priory, to Richard and Elizabeth Codyngton. The parish comprises by computation 1071 acres; the soil in some parts is wet and fenny, but in the remainder of average quality for grain. The living is a donative; net income, £21; patron and impropriator, Sir C. M. Lamb, Bart.

Thorpe-By-Water

THORPE-BY-WATER, a hamlet, in the parish of Seaton, union of Uppingham, hundred of Wrandike, county of Rutland, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Uppingham; containing 84 inhabitants.

Thorpe-Constantine (St. Constantine)

THORPE-CONSTANTINE (St. Constantine), a parish, in the union of Tamworth, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 5 miles (N. E.) from Tamworth; containing 42 inhabitants. It comprises 953a. 1r. 4p.; the soil in some parts is a moderately light loam, and in others a clayey mixture resting upon a bed of yellow sand. The road from Tamworth to Ashby-de-la-Zouch runs for about half a mile through the south-western extremity of the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 5. 5., and in the gift of Capt. William Inge: the tithes have been commuted for £230, and the glebe contains 100a. 3r. 8p. The church, of which the body was rebuilt in 1778, has a square tower surmounted by a lofty spire.

Thorpe-In-Balne

THORPE-IN-BALNE, a township, in the parish of Barnby-upon-Don, union of Doncaster, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 6½ miles (N. N. E.) from Doncaster; containing 119 inhabitants. This township, which lies on the west side of the Don, comprises by computation 1440 acres, in good cultivation; the village is small but neatly built, and is pleasantly situated on the river. The great tithes have been commuted for £119. The remains of a chapel that was demolished several centuries ago have been converted into a barn.

Thorpe-In-The-Street

THORPE-IN-THE-STREET, a township, in the parish of Nun-Burnholme, union of Pocklington, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. W. by W.) from MarketWeighton; containing 30 inhabitants.

Thorpe-Le-Soken (St. Mary)

THORPE-LE-SOKEN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Tendring, N. division of Essex, 12 miles (E. S. E.) from Colchester; containing 1365 inhabitants. The three parishes of Thorpe, Kirby, and Walton, form a manor termed " the liberty of the Soken," having within its limits two or three reputed manors of smaller extent. The manor was given to the church of St. Paul, London, by King Athelstan, before 941. It still belonged to the canons at the time of the Norman survey, and the dean and chapter continued to hold it, with the three advowsons as their peculiars, until deprived of the jurisdiction by Henry VIII. Mary, by letters-patent dated March 2nd, 1554, placed the whole under the visitation of the Bishop of London. Edward VI. granted the manors and advowsons, with all their privileges, to Sir Thomas D'Arcy, vice-chamberlain of his household, and they have since had various owners. The lord of the manor appoints a commissary, who has a court, proves wills, and grants marriagelicences, &c.; he also chooses a coroner and other officers for the liberty.

The parish comprises by admeasurement 3203 acres, of which 2574 are arable, 195 pasture, 32 woodland, and 402 salt-marsh and waste; the soil is in general fertile. A creek, or arm of the sea, runs up to Landermere, a small hamlet in the parish, where is a convenient wharf, at which vessels take in corn for the London market, and discharge their cargoes of coal, manure, &c. A customary market is held every Wednesday evening; and there are fairs on the Monday before Whitsuntide and September 29th. The petty-sessions for the division take place here alternately with Mistley. The living is a discharged vicarage, consolidated with the vicarages of Kirby and Walton, and valued in the king's books at £16; impropriator, J. Martin Leake, Esq., of Thorpe Hall. The church, an ancient structure, was entirely repewed in 1827: the chancel contains several monuments to the Leakes, and one to a member of the Wharton family; in the vestry is a figure of a warrior, with a lion at his feet. The Baptists have a place of worship. A number of French refugees settled and had a chapel here, but there are no remains of the building.

Thorpe-Le-Willows

THORPE-LE-WILLOWS, a township, in the parish of Kilburn, wapentake of Birdforth, union of Helmsley, N. riding of York, 5 miles (S. by W.) of Helmsley; containing 19 inhabitants. The township comprises about 400 acres of land set out in three farms, and occupies a low situation near the confluence of two small rivulets. The tithes have been commuted for £118. 17., payable to the Archbishop of York.

Thorpe, Little (St. Mary)

THORPE, LITTLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Depwade, hundred of Diss, E. division of Norfolk, 1 mile (E.) from Scole; containing 18 inhabitants, and comprising about 300 acres. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Billingford, and valued in the king's books at £4: the great tithes belong to George Wilson, Esq., and have been commuted for £26. The church is in ruins.

Thorpe-Lubenham

THORPE-LUBENHAM, an extra-parochial place, in the union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (W. by S.) from Harborough; containing 11 inhabitants, and consisting of 367 acres.

Thorpe-Malsor (St. Leonard)

THORPE-MALSOR (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Kettering, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (W. N. W.) from Kettering; containing 297 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1000 acres: there are several quarries of red-sandstone, used for building. Thorpe-Malsor manor-house, a good building of the age of James I., and in the form of the letter H, is the seat of T. P. Maunsell, Esq., M.P. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 14. 2.; net income, £255; patron, Mr. Maunsell. The church is in the later English style, with a lofty spire, and contains memorials to the Maunsell family. Robert Talbot, an early English antiquary, was born here about the close of the fifteenth century.

Thorpe-Mandeville (St. John the Baptist)

THORPE-MANDEVILLE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Brackley, hundred of King'sSutton, S. division of the county of Northampton, 6 miles (N. E. by E.) from Banbury; containing 154 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 900 acres: stone is quarried for the roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 2. 11.; net income, £281; patron, R. P. Humfrey, Esq. The tithes were partially commuted for land in 1773; the glebe altogether contains about 175 acres. The church, which is almost wholly of the 14th century, contains monuments to the Pargiter and Humfrey families: the ancient iron frame that belonged to the pulpit hour-glass is still preserved.

Thorpe, Market (St. Margaret)

THORPE, MARKET (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of North Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 4¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from North Walsham; containing 261 inhabitants. It comprises 1309a. 24p., of which about 869 acres are arable, 157 pasture, and 256 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the donative mediety of Bradfield annexed, valued in the king's books at £5. 11. 3., and in the gift of Lord Suffield: the great tithes have been commuted for £155. 10., and the vicarial for £75; the glebe comprises 33 acres. The church, rebuilt at the expense of the first Lord Suffield, is an elegant structure of flint and freestone, having at each angle a turret, and each side being terminated by a gable, with a stone cross; the windows are of stained glass.

Thorpe-Morieux (St. Mary)

THORPE-MORIEUX (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Cosford, W. division of Suffolk, 4¼ miles (N. W.) from Bildeston; containing 418 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 14. 4½.; patron, the Rev. Thomas Harrison: the tithes have been commuted for £620, and the glebe consists of 24 acres.

Thorpe-Next-Haddiscoe (St. Matthias)

THORPE-NEXT-HADDISCOE (St. Matthias), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Clavering, E. division of Norfolk, 6½ miles (N. by E.) from Beccles; containing 101 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown and Lord Calthorpe, alternately: the tithes have been commuted for £160, and the glebe contains nearly 15 acres. The church is partly in the early and partly in the later English style, and has a chancel of brick lately erected, with a circular tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The inhabitants are exempt from serving on juries, by a charter of Henry VI.

Thorpe-On-The-Hill (All Saints)

THORPE-ON-THE-HILL (All Saints), a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of BoothbyGraffo, parts of Kesteven, union and county of Lincoln, 6 miles (S. W.) from Lincoln; containing 342 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1800 acres. It is situated on the Nottingham and Lincoln road, and the Nottingham and Lincoln railway has a station here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 10.; net income, £247; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln: the glebe contains 267 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Thorpe-On-The-Hill

THORPE-ON-THE-HILL, a township, in the parish of Rothwell, union of Wakefield, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. by W.) from Leeds; containing 72 inhabitants. This place, which is now united with Lofthouse, was anciently the seat of the Swillingtons, and subsequently of the Gascoigne and the Ingram families. The township comprises 521 acres; the soil is fertile, and the scenery pleasingly diversified. Several Roman coins have been found, in the moulds in which they were formed.

Thorpe-Salvin (St. Peter)

THORPE-SALVIN (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Worksop, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Worksop; containing 340 inhabitants. This place is situated at the junction of the counties of York, Derby, and Nottingham. It was anciently the property of the Salvin family, and subsequently of the Sandfords, by whom the now ruined Hall was erected about the middle of the 16th century. The parish comprises 2198a. 19p. of land, at present chiefly the property of the Duke of Leeds; about 1572 acres are arable, 340 pasture, and 286 wood: the soil is a rich earth, resting on limestone. The village, which is near the Chesterfield and Trent canal, is neatly built: it has a malting establishment; the making of bricks, for which clay of good quality is found in the parish, employs a few persons, and there are two corn-mills. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £63; patron, the Chancellor of York Cathedral. The church was erected in the reign of Henry I., with the exception of the tower and north aisle, which are of later date: it retains much of its original character, and has a remarkably fine Norman porch; in the interior are a noble arch, and a font of large dimensions with sculptured representations of the seasons. A parochial school is supported by subscription.

Thorpe-Satchville

THORPE-SATCHVILLE, a chapelry, in the parish of Twyford, union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 5½ miles (S. by W.) from Melton-Mowbray; with 153 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Michael.

Thorpe, Stoney

THORPE, STONEY, a hamlet, in the parish of Long Itchington, union of Southam, Southam division of the hundred of Knightlow, S. division of the county of Warwick, 1 mile (W. by N.) from Southam. The term Stoney was derived from the rocky condition of the ground on which the hamlet stands, and Thorpe, in old English, signifies a petty village. The hamlet now consists of a mansion-house, a water-mill, and two farmhouses; and is a reputed manor, appointing its own surveyor of the highways, &c. The family of Chamberlayne, formerly of Princethorpe, in the county, has been seated here for many centuries; Henry Thomas Chamberlayne, Esq., is the present owner. The land is of good quality, and white limestone is quarried: one of the old churches of Coventry was built of this stone. There was anciently a chapel, now converted into a stable.

Thorpe-Tilney

THORPE-TILNEY, a township, in the parish of Timberland, union of Sleaford, First division of the wapentake of Langoe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 10½ miles (N. N. E.) from Sleaford; containing 126 inhabitants. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £327, and the vicarial for £93.

Thorpe-Underwood

THORPE-UNDERWOOD, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of Rothwell, poor-law union of Kettering, N. division of the county of Northampton, 1¼ mile (W.) from Rothwell; containing 22 inhabitants, and consisting of 512 acres.

Thorpe, West

THORPE, WEST, a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 7 miles (N. W. by N.) from the city of Lincoln; containing 51 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 857 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Aisthorpe, and valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 6. There is no church.

Thorpe-Willoughby

THORPE-WILLOUGHBY, a township, in the parish of Brayton, union of Selby, Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 2½ miles (W. S. W.) from Selby; containing 157 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 430 acres, the property of the Hon. E. R. Petre, lord of the manor: the village is pleasantly situated on the road to Leeds.

Thorpland

THORPLAND, a parish, in the union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 3¾ miles (N.) from Downham; comprising about 440 acres. The living is a rectory, consolidated with those of Holme, South Runcton, and Wallington: the church, dedicated to St. Thomas, has long been in ruins.

Thorrington (St. Mary Magdalene)

THORRINGTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union and hundred of Tendring, N. division of Essex, 7 miles (S. E. by E.) from Colchester; containing 531 inhabitants. It comprises 1930 acres, of which 37 are common; the situation is low, the soil light, and much intermixed with sand. The living is a rectory, united to that of Frating, and valued in the king's books at £16: the church is ancient, with a tower of flint and stone. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Thorverton (St. Thomas à Becket)

THORVERTON (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, hundred of Hayridge, Collumpton and N. divisions of Devon, 7 miles (W. S. W.) from Collumpton; containing 1445 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Exeter to Tiverton, and bounded on the east by the river Exe; and comprises by admeasurement 4000 acres. Stone is quarried for building. Sheep-fairs are held in February and July. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 12. 8½., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Exeter: the great tithes have been commuted for £530, and the vicarial for £446; there is a glebe of 27 acres, and a substantial parsonage-house has been built. The church, which is very handsome, is supposed to have been erected in the reign of King John. Here is a place of worship for Baptists; also a school endowed with £18 per annum. At East Raddon was a chapel dedicated to St. John the Baptist, the remains of which have been converted into a dwelling-house called "No Man's Chapel."

Thoydon-Bois (St. Mary)

THOYDON-BOIS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Epping, hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 3½ miles (S.) from Epping: containing 538 inhabitants. This parish, which is the least extensive of the three named Thoydon, is partly included in Epping Forest, and takes its distinguishing epithet Bois from the abundance of woodlands within its boundaries. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Dare family, with a net income of £68: the church is small, with a belfrytower of wood surmounted by a shingled spire.

Thoydon-Garnon, or Cooper-Sail (All Saints)

THOYDON-GARNON, or Cooper-Sail (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Epping, hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 2½ miles (S. S. E.) from Epping; containing 1072 inhabitants. The parish takes the adjunct to its name from the family of Gernon, who were anciently its proprietors. It comprises 2910 acres, of which 100 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17, and in the patronage of the Abdy family: the tithes have been commuted for £634, and there is a glebe of 64 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, with a massive square tower, and contains some interesting monuments; on the steeple is an inscription commemorating the bounty of Sir John Crosbie or Crosby, the founder of Crosby Hall, London, who contributed towards its erection. In this parish is situated the Epping union workhouse. Baron Dimsdale, the celebrated inoculator for the small-pox, was born here.

Thoydon, Mount (St. Michael)

THOYDON, MOUNT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Ongar, S. division of Essex, 4 miles (S. E.) from Epping; containing 217 inhabitants. It derives the adjunct to its name from its situation in the most elevated portion of the Thoydon district. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Tawney-Stapleford, and valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.: the tithes have been commuted for £301, and the glebe comprises 19½ acres. The church is a handsome edifice, containing many fine monuments to the family of Smyth, among which is one to Sir Thomas Smyth, chancellor of the garter, and principal secretary of state, in the reigns of Edward VI. and Elizabeth.