Thrumpton - Thurlby

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

349-351

Citation Show another format:

'Thrumpton - Thurlby', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 349-351. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51341 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Thrumpton (All Saints)

THRUMPTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Basford, N. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 7 miles (S. W.) from Nottingham; containing 147 inhabitants. It is situated on the Trent, and comprises by computation 900 acres. On the bank of the river is a fine old mansion, built by the Pigot family in 1630, in the style prevalent in the reign of Elizabeth. The Midland railway passes through the parish, within a mile of the village. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £77, and in the patronage of the coheiresses of the late J. E. Wescomb, Esq.

Thrunscoe

THRUNSCOE, a hamlet, in the parish of Clee, union of Caistor, wapentake of Bradley-Haverstoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 25 inhabitants. It comprises about 550 acres.

Thrup

THRUP, a hamlet, in the parish of Kidlington, poor-law union of Woodstock, hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford, 1½ mile (E. S. E.) from Woodstock; containing 125 inhabitants.

Thrupp and Wick

THRUPP and WICK, a liberty, in the parish of Radley, poor-law union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks, 1½ mile (E.) from Abingdon; containing 28 inhabitants.

Thrupp

THRUPP, a hamlet, in the parish of Norton, union of Daventry, hundred of Fawsley, S. division of the county of Northampton, with 46 inhabitants.

Thrupp, The

THRUPP, THE, a hamlet, in the parish and uuion of Stroud, hundred of Bisley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 1 mile from Stroud. It is pleasantly situated in a vale, near the Thames and Severn canal. About 2000 persons are employed in the manufacture of superfine woollen-cloths, chiefly black, for which there are two very extensive and several smaller establishments. In the hamlet are also a large wool-stapling business, an iron and brass foundry, and a general engineering establishment in which from 40 to 50 persons are regularly engaged. Here is an endowed school in connexion with the Established Church.

Thruscross, or West-End

THRUSCROSS, or West-End, a chapelry, in the parish of Fewston, union of Pateley-Bridge, Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 10 miles (N. N. W.) from Otley; containing 576 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises the hamlets of Bramley-Head, West-End, Low-Green, Thruscross-Green, and Rockingstone-Hall. It contains about 6340 acres, of which a considerable portion is moorland, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with a little arable, in good cultivation; the surface is diversified with hills and valleys richly wooded. Large quantities of flax are spun, for which there are four mills. The village is situated in a romantic vale. The chapel, a neat edifice, was enlarged in 1810, and in 1841 was repaired and beautified by voluntary contributions; it is served by the vicar or his curate, the stipend of the latter being derived from the Church Pastoral-Aid Society. Here are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists.

Thrushelton (St. George)

THRUSHELTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Tavistock, hundred of Lifton, Lifton and S. divisions of Devon, 10 miles (S. W. by W.) from Oakhampton; containing 628 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Mary-Stow: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £130, and the vicarial for £109. By a deed dated 1504, the parishioners were allowed on certain conditions to have a cemetery near their chapel, to avoid the difficulty they experienced from inundation, in conveying their dead to the burialground at Mary-Stow.

Thrussington (Holy Trinity)

THRUSSINGTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 8¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Leicester; containing 645 inhabitants. It is situated about a mile from the Leicester and Melton-Mowbray road, and comprises 1953a. 3r. 31p., of which 911 acres are arable, 1002 pasture, and 40 woodland; the soil in some parts is clayey, and in others sandy. The river Wreak and the Melton navigation pass through the parish. Here are the kennels of the Melton Hunt, erected at an expense of £12,000, by the late Sir Harry Goodricke, Bart.; they contain stabling for 60 horses, and kennels for 300 hounds, with offices for 20 servants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £240; patron, Mrs. Bishopp. The church, which is a very ancient edifice, has been lately repewed.

Thruxton (St. Bartholomew)

THRUXTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Dore, hundred of Webtree, county of Hereford, 6¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Hereford; containing 55 inhabitants, and comprising 430 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, with the vicarage of Kingstone united, valued in the king's books at £4. 8. 4.; net income, £252; patron, the Dean; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter, of Hereford. The tithes of Thruxton have been commuted for £99. 15., and the glebe consists of 8½ acres.

Thruxton (Holy Rood)

THRUXTON (Holy Rood), a parish, in the union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (W.) from Andover; containing 246 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1804 acres, of which 1457 are arable, 271 pasture, and 76 woodland and plantation. Redenham, in the parish, is the seat of Sir John Pollen, Bart. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 12. 11., and in the gift of the Rev. Donald Baynes: the tithes have been commuted for £387, and there are 50 acres of glebe. The church was repaired in 1839, and an east window of painted glass presented by the Rev. D. Baynes. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A beautiful Roman pavement, nearly perfect, was discovered in 1823.

Thundersley (St. Peter)

THUNDERSLEY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Billericay, partly in the hundred of Rochford, but chiefly in the hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 2¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Rayleigh; containing 596 inhabitants, of whom 120 are in the hamlet. This parish is about two miles in length, and a mile and a half in breadth, and comprises 2100 acres, of which 100 are common or waste; the village is on elevated ground, and the surrounding scenery is pleasingly diversified. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Rev. G. Hemming: the tithes have been commuted for £570; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe comprises 40 acres. The church is a venerable structure in the later Norman and early English styles, with a tower and spire.

Thundridge (St. Mary and All Saints)

THUNDRIDGE (St. Mary and All Saints), a parish, in the union of Ware, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford, 2½ miles (N. N. E.) from Ware; containing, with part of the hamlet of Wadesmill, 535 inhabitants, and an area of 2170 acres. The living is a vicarage, annexed to that of Ware, and valued in the king's books at £6. The church has an embattled tower with a lofty spire.

Thurcaston (All Saints)

THURCASTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Leicester; containing, with the chapelry of Anstey and the township of Cropston, 1230 inhabitants, of whom 281 are in Thurcaston township. The parish comprises by admeasurement 1198 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 7. 8½.; net income, £676; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, to whom the advowson was given by Sir Francis Walsingham, secretary of state to Queen Elizabeth. The tithes were commuted for land and an annual money payment in 1798; there is a paraonagehouse, and the glebe comprises altogether between 400 and 500 acres. The church was lately restored by the incumbent, the Rev. Richard Waterfield, at a cost of £800: it has a tower with three bells. The venerable reformer and martyr, Hugh Latimer, Bishop of Worcester, was born here about 1480; and Dr. Hurd, bishop of the same diocese, was for some time incumbent: a handsome monument to the former, surmounted by his bust in white marble, was raised in the church, by the Rev. Richard Waterfield, in 1843.

Thurgarton (All Saints)

THURGARTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Eupingham, hundred of North Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 8 miles (N.) from Aylsham; containing 247 inhabitants. Of this place, in Domesday book called Thurgartund, the abbot of St. Bennet at Holme was lord in the reign of Edward the Confessor; and in the 5th year of King John, Thomas de Thurgarton held lands here of the abbot. Henry VIII. settled the abbey on the Bishop of Norwich, since which time the lordship has been appropriated to that see. The parish comprises by admeasurement 969 acres; the surface is flat, and the soil a good loamy earth. Thurgarton Hall is the residence of W. D. Spurrell, Esq., whose family have occupied the mansion for several centuries. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Bishop: the tithes have been commuted for £232; the glebe contains 10 acres. The church is in the decorated style; it consists of a nave and chancel separated by a carved screen, and has several memorials to the Spurrell family.

Thurgarton (St. Peter)

THURGARTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Southwell, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton and of the county of Nottingham, 3¼ miles (S. by W.) from Southwell; containing 365 inhabitants. It is situated at the foot of a declivity overlooking the Trent, and comprises 2500 acres, of a clayey soil. The Nottingham and Lincoln railway has a station here, 6½ miles from the Newark station. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £56; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The church, formerly a magnificent structure, now consists only of one aisle. An Augustine priory in honour of St. Peter, was founded at Thurgarton in 1130, by Ralph de Ayncourt; it had a revenue of £359. 15. 10.

Thurgoland

THURGOLAND, a township, in the parish of Silkstone, union of Wortley, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (E. S. E) from Penistone; containing 1333 inhabitants. It comprises an area of about 2080 acres, irregularly broken into hills; the scenery is wild and varied, and the higher grounds command extensive prospects over large tracts of wood, and fertile vales. The substratum abounds with coal of excellent quality, of which several mines are in operation. The village is built on an eminence, on the road from Sheffield to Penistone, overlooking the river Don: many of its inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of steel and iron wire. The Manchester and Sheffield railway passes through the township, within half a mile of the village. A church was erected in 1841, at an expense of £1400, on a site given by Lord Wharncliffe, who also presented £100; it contains 507 sittings, of which 104 are free. The living is in the gift of the Vicar of Silkstone. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In a field called Chapel Flat, near Pule-Hill Hall, the remains of an ancient chapel were visible about a century since; and in digging the ground in search of stone, several human bones have been discovered, at a depth of three feet from the surface.

Thurlaston (All Saints)

THURLASTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Blaby, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 6 miles (N. E. by E.) from Hinckley; containing, with the hamlet of Normanton-Turville, 694 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1727 acres, of which 100 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 19. 7.; net income, £400; patron, the Rev. J. Arkwright. The chancel of the church is attached to the manor.

Thurlaston

THURLASTON, a township, in the parish of Dunchurch, union of Rugby, Rugby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 1 mile (W.) from Dunchurch; containing 307 inhabitants, and comprising 1714 acres of a moderately productive soil.

Thurlbear (St. Thomas)

THURLBEAR (St. Thomas), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of North Curry, W. division of Somerset, 3½ miles (S. E.) from Taunton; containing 194 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 940 acres: limestone is quarried, and stone for building. The living is a rectory and donative, in the gift of Lord Portman: the tithes have been commuted for £150; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 36 acres. The church is a Norman structure: it was anciently a chapel to the vicarage of St. Mary Magdalene, in Taunton, but the tithes were restored by Sir Thomas Petman, Bart.

Thurlby (St. German)

THURLBY (St. German), a parish, in the union of Newark, Lower division of the wapentake of BoothbyGraffo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 8½ miles (S. W.) from Lincoln; containing 154 inhabitants. It lies between the rivers Trent and Witham, and comprises 1802a. 11p. The surface rises gradually from each river towards the centre of the parish; the soil, comprising almost every variety, is adapted to the growth of different kinds of produce. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £55; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln: the tithes have been commuted for £204; the glebe comprises about 20 acres. The church is principally in the later English style.

Thurlby

THURLBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Bilsby, union of Spilsby, Wold division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (E.) from Alford; containing 31 inhabitants. It was anciently a parish, and had a church.

Thurlby (St. Firmin)

THURLBY (St. Firmin), a parish, in the union of Bourne, wapentake of Ness, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Market-Deeping; containing, with the hamlets of Northorpe and Obthorpe, 699 inhabitants. It is on the road from Lincoln to Peterborough; and comprises by admeasurement 3842 acres; the soil passes through several varieties, from gravel on the hill to loamy alluvial soil in the fen. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 9. 4½.; net income, £252; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of Eton College. The tithes were commuted for land in 1802; there is a parsonage-house, with 200 acres of glebe. The church is a handsome cruciform structure: it comprises portions of Norman architecture, and contains curious specimens of early piscinae and sedilia, with the remains of a rood-loft; also two chantries. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. The ancient Roman canal, Carr Dyke, passes close by the church.