Thwaite - Tickton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

355-357

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'Thwaite - Tickton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 355-357. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51343+ Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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Thwaite (All Saints)

THWAITE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of South Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 4¾ miles (N.) from Aylsham; containing 170 inhabitants. The parish is high ground commanding fine views of the surrounding country, and comprises 601 acres, of which 49 are common or waste. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7, and in the gift of the Bishop of Norwich: the tithes have been commuted for £200; the glebe contains 7 acres. The church has a fine Norman entrance on the south.

Thwaite (St. Mary)

THWAITE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Loddon, E. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (N.) from Bungay; containing 110 inhabitants, and comprising about 500 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4, and in the gift of the Duke of Norfolk: there is a glebe of 15 acres, and the tithes have been commuted for £175. The church, which is chiefly in the early style, has a rich Norman doorway.

Thwaite (St. George)

THWAITE (St. George), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hartismere, W. division of Suffolk, 4¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Eye; containing 176 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 800 acres. The surface is flat, with a few slight undulations; the soil is in some parts heavy, but in general fertile, and produces grain of good quality. The village is situated on the road from London to Norwich, through Ipswich, and has a general post-office; petty-sessions are held here monthly; and there are fairs for cattle on the 30th June and 26th November. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 5½., and in the gift of J. Sheppard, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £240; the glebe contains 21½ acres.

Thwaites

THWAITES, a chapelry, in the parish of Millom, union of Bootle, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 10 miles (S. E.) from Ravenglass; containing 356 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £99; patrons, four Landowners in the chapelry. The chapel was rebuilt in 1715, and dedicated to St. Anne in 1724.

Thwing (All Saints)

THWING (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Bridhngton, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 8 miles (W. N. W.) from Bridlington; containing, with the township of Octon, 452 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 3600 acres of land, chiefly arable: the village lies a short distance north of the road from Bridlington to Sledmere. The living is a rectory, in medieties, each valued in the king's books at £8. 12. 1.; net income, £500; patron, the Crown. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1769. A few years since, the church, a very ancient edifice, was repaired and beautified, and an east window of painted glass added, at the expense of Robert Prickett, Esq., lord of the manor, who also erected a tablet in it to the memory of Archbishop Lamplugh, a native of the parish. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have places of worship.

Tibbenham (All Saints)

TIBBENHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Depwade, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Stratton St. Mary; containing 749 inhabitants. It comprises 3286a. 33p., of which 2350 acres are arable, and 903 meadow and pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Bishop of Ely: the great tithes have been commuted for £769, and the vicarial for £325; there is a parsonage-house, and the vicarial glebe consists of 25 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower surmounted at the corners by representations of the Four Evangelists; at the east end of the aisle is a chapel dedicated to St. Nicholas. The proceeds of an estate, amounting to £40 per annum, are applied to the repairs of the edifice. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship. About a mile south-east of the church is Chanons Hall, occupying the site of the ancient manor-house of Chanons, which was a very extensive structure surrounded by a moat. An old building called the Guild Hall, now inhabited by poor people, belonged to a religious fraternity.

Tibberton (Holy Trinity)

TIBBERTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Newent, duchy of Lancaster, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 4¼ miles (S. E.) from Newent; containing 344 inhabitants. This place formed part of the hundred of Botloe until the 30th of Edward III., when, Lancashire being made a county palatine, all the estates of the Duke of Lancaster in this county, of which Tibberton was one, were erected into a new hundred of the duchy. The parish comprises 1337a. 1r. 20p.; the surface is varied, and the soil a stiff clay. A stream called Tibberton brook falls into the river Leddon, in the adjacent parish of Rudford; and the Herefordshire and Gloucestershire canal passes on the eastern side of this parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 0½., and in the gift of the Scott family: the tithes have been commuted for £327, and the glebe comprises 5 acres.

Tibberton

TIBBERTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Edgmond, union of Droitwich, Newport division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 4¼ miles (W. by N.) from Newport; containing 329 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to All Saints. The tithes, including those of Cherrington, have been commuted for £685, and there is a glebe of 43½ acres.

Tibberton (St. Nicholas)

TIBBERTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Newport, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Worcester; containing 339 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1202a. 1r. 26p. of land, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture; the surface is undulated, the soil chiefly a good rich marl, and the scenery picturesque. Some of the inhabitants are employed in making gloves for the Worcester manufacturers. The Gloucester and Birmingham railway passes through the parish, and the Birmingham and Worcester canal along its northwestern boundary. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Worcester (the appropriators), valued in the king's books at £3. 15. 10.; net income, £132. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1810; the glebe contains 72 acres. The church, an ancient structure, was repewed and beautified in 1841. There is a place of worship for Lady Huntingdon's Connexion; also a Church Sunday school.

Tiberton (St. Mary)

TIBERTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Dore, hundred of Webtree, county of Hereford, 9 miles (W.) from Hereford; containing 152 inhabitants, and comprising 1040 acres. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Madley. The church, which is built entirely of brick, contains a fine carved altar-piece, representing the instruments of the Crucifixion.

Tibshelf (St. John the Baptist)

TIBSHELF (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Mansfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Alfreton; containing 791 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Mansfield to Matlock, and comprises 2400 acres, the whole of which, with the exception of 500 acres belonging to the Duke of Devonshire, is the property of St. Thomas's Hospital, by a grant of King Edward VI. Stone of an inferior quality is quarried, and used for building; coal-mines are worked to a considerable extent, and many of the population are employed in weaving or seaming stockings. The village consists of a long street. At Doe Hill and Hirst are pleasant residences, and at Biggin and Marlpits good farms. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 5. 3., and in the gift, for the next turn, of John Robert Sharpe, Esq.; net income, £172. There is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 42 acres. The body of the church was rebuilt in 1727, in the Grecian style; the tower and chancel are in the early English style. Here is a chalybeate spring.

Tibthorp

TIBTHORP, a township, in the parish of KirkBurn, union of Driffield, Bainton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 5¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Driffield; containing 249 inhabitants. The township comprises about 2780 acres, divided among several freeholders, of whom the Duke of Devonshire is lord of the manor: the village is pleasantly situated on the eastern declivity of the Wolds, and on the high road between Wetvvang and Bainton. The tithes were commuted for land in 1794. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ticehurst (St. Mary)

TICEHURST (St. Mary), a parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Shoyswell, rape of Hastings, E. division of Sussex, 6 miles (S.) from Lamberhurst; containing 2465 inhabitants. It comprises 8197a. 2r. 36p., of which about 2600 acres are wood, and 400 in hop-grounds; the surface is boldly undulated, and the scenery diversified. The village occupies a gentle eminence on the road from TonbridgeWells to Hastings, and in its immediate vicinity is Highlands, the property of Charles Newington, Esq. An agricultural association has been established; a cornmarket is held on Mondays, and there are cattle-fairs on May 4th and October 7th. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 7. 6.; net income, £350; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury: the incumbent has a house, with a glebe of about 12 acres. The church is principally in the decorated style of English architecture, and consists of a nave, aisles, chancel, and two chapels, with an embattled tower surmounted by a low spire. A district church dedicated to St. Peter, was erected in 1838, at Stonegate, at a cost of about £1100, by Mrs. Courthope and her son G. C. Courthope, Esq., of Whiligh, by whom it was also endowed with £1000; it is in the early English style. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Mr. Courthope. Another district church in the same style, dedicated to St. Augustine, was erected in 1839, at Flimwell, by subscription; and Mrs. Maryatt, who contributed largely towards its erection, endowed it with £1000: it is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Bishop of Chichester, with a total net income of £100. The Wesleyans and Baptists have places of worship. The poor-law union comprises 8 parishes or places, and contains a population of 14,197.

Tichfield, Hampshire.—See Titchfield.

TICHFIELD, Hampshire.—See Titchfield.

Tickencote (St. Peter)

TICKENCOTE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of East, county of Rutland, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from Stamford; containing 111 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from London to York, and comprises 1270 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 5. 8., and in the gift of John Wingfield, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £162. 9., and the glebe comprises 3½ acres. The church was in the earliest Norman style, but has been partially rebuilt: Stukeley says, "it is the most venerable church extant, and was the entire oratory of Prince Peada, founder of Peterborough Abbey."

Tickenham (St. Quiricus and St. Julietta)

TICKENHAM (St. Quiricus and St. Julietta), a parish, in the union of Bedminster, hundred of Portbury, E. division of Somerset, 9 miles (W. by S.) from Bristol; containing 423 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Bristol to Clevedon, and comprises 1627a. 30p. Limestone of good quality is quarried for building, the repair of roads, and agricultural use; and small portions of lead have been found. The Nailsea station on the Bristol and Exeter railway is a mile to the south. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to that of Portbury, and valued in the king's books at £8. 15. 5.: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £150. About a mile north of the church are the remains of a double intrenched Roman camp.

Tickhill (St. Mary)

TICKHILL (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Doncaster, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York; containing, with the township of Stancill with Wellingley and Wilsick, 2040 inhabitants, of whom 1981 are in Tickhill township, 45 miles (S.) from York, and 157 (N. by W.) from London. This manor was given by William the Conqueror to Roger de Busli, who erected or rebuilt the castle, which, with the honour of Tickhill, being subsequently forfeited, was granted by King Stephen to the Count of Eu, in Normandy. The property afterwards reverted to the crown, and was bestowed by Richard I. upon his brother, Prince John. In the reign of Henry III., it was restored to the then Count of Eu, but, after several changes, became again vested in the crown, in the time of Henry IV. At the commencement of the great civil war, the castle, at that time considered a very strong fortress, was garrisoned for the king, and, after a siege of two days, was surrendered to the assailants, and eventually dismantled by order of parliament.

The town is situated in a fertile valley, close to the river Torn, on the border of the county of Nottingham, and on the roads between Doncaster and Worksop, and Bawtry and Sheffield, which here cross each other. The streets are neat and spacious, and the houses in general of respectable appearance, but built in a straggling manner; the inhabitants are well supplied with water. The trade in malt was formerly large, and at present there are several very extensive kilns, three cornmills, and a paper-manufactory. The market, held on Friday, was for some years discontinued, but was revived in 1836; and a fair is held on the second Friday in October, for cattle, and various articles of merchandise: the market-cross is a circular building of stone, erected in 1776, in the centre of the town. Manorial courts leet and baron are held annually. The parish comprises 5336a. 21p., of which 1000 acres are pasture, 56 woodland, and the remainder arable; the soil, a sandy loam, is generally fertile, and the greater part of a large tract of peat-moss has been brought under profitable cultivation. The substrata are chiefly limestone, clay, and red-sandstone.

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 6.; net income, £261; patron and impropriator, G. S. Foljambe, Esq.: the vicarial tithes were commuted for land in 1765. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a fine tower: it was greatly injured by lightning in 1825, but afterwards underwent a complete repair, at an expense of £1950. In the chancel is an altar, or altar-tomb, ornamented at the sides with large quatrefoils: on the wall near it, is a brass plate with an inscription to the memory of William Eastfield, seneschal of the lordship of Holderness, and of the honour of Tickhill, who died in 1386; and at the east end of the south aisle is an alabaster monument with the effigies of a knight and his lady. All these have evidently been brought hither from other places, perhaps from decayed religious houses. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. Near the church is a Maison de Dieu, of uncertain foundation, comprising fourteen almshouses for widows. The remains of the castle, on the south-east side of the town, consist of the mound, on which the foundations of the keep are visible; the ditch, with part of the external walls; and a dilapidated Norman gateway: the northern part has been converted into a modern residence, and the ground within the walls formed into gardens and shrubberies. The ruins of an Augustine priory, established in the reign of Henry III., and situated in an adjacent vale, have been made into a farmhouse. John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, resided at Tickhill Castle.

Ticknall, otherwise Tickenhall (St. Thomas à Becket)

TICKNALL, otherwise Tickenhall (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Ashby-de-laZouch, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 9½ miles (S.) from Derby; containing 1271 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Derby to Ashby, and comprises 1860a. 1r. 19p., mostly pasture, with some woodland; it is of a clayey soil on the south side, and a light loam on the north and north-west. Extensive lime-works are in operation, affording employment to many of the population, and there are tramways for conveying the lime to various parts. About three-quarters of a mile south of the village is a manufactory of brown earthenware. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £262; patron and impropriator, Sir John HarpurCrewe, Bart.; a parsonage-house was built in 1839, and there is a glebe of about 70½ acres, valued at £140. The church was rebuilt in 1842, at a cost of £4000; it is in the early English style, and consists of a nave, chancel, aisles, and a tower and handsome spire, with a beautiful east window of stained glass. Here are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. A school-house was erected by Dame Catherine Harpur, who, in 1744, conveyed for its support some land now producing an income of £25; the premises were rebuilt in 1825, at the expense of Sir George Crewe. An hospital for seven decayed housekeepers was founded in 1771, by Charles Harpur, Esq., who gave £500 for building it, and endowed it with £2000, now yielding £70 per annum. Lady Crewe supports a girls' school of 40 children.

Tickton, with Hull-Bridge

TICKTON, with Hull-Bridge, a township, in the parish of St. John, Beverley, union, and liberties of the borough, of Beverley, E. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Beverley; containing 251 inhabitants, of whom 193 are in Tickton. The hamlet of Tickton was in possession of the church of St. John at Beverley so early as the time of Athelstan, and is returned in Domesday book as a berewick belonging to the archbishop, in Holderness. It is situated a little east of the Hull river, and Hull-bridge derives its name from a bridge at that place over the river. The township comprises 700 acres, nearly all arable land: the surface is level, interspersed with ornamental plantations; the soil in the carrs is of a vegetable quality, imbedded with numerous trees, and in other parts is found a kind of loam. On the river is a commodious wharf. A church was erected in 1843, at a cost of £800, by public subscription. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. On the lands of S. Wonnald, Esq., is a strong chalybeate spring, which forces itself upwards, a height of two yards, in the manner of a fountain.