Tidcombe - Tilmanstone

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

357-360

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'Tidcombe - Tilmanstone', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 357-360. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51344 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Tidcombe (St. Michael)

TIDCOMBE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Hungerford, hundred of Kinwardstone, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts, 6£ miles (N. N. E.) from Ludgershall; containing 226 inhabitants, and comprising about 2000 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £77; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Windsor. The tithes have been commuted for a rent charge of £468, and the glebe contains 47½ acres.

Tiddesley-Hay

TIDDESLEY-HAY, an extra-parochial liberty, in the E. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 2¼ miles (N. E.) from Penkridge; comprising 3500 acres, and containing 61 inhabitants. This was a royal chase, adjoining that of Cannock, till the reign of Elizabeth, who granted it jointly to the Earls of Warwick and Leicester, by whom it was sold to Sir Edward Littleton, of Pillaton Hall. There were then no other inclosures upon it than two parks, and in that state it continued till recently, when it was wholly appropriated by Lord Hatherton.

Tiddington

TIDDINGTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Albury, union of Thame, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford, 3¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Tetsworth; containing 207 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £162.

Tidenham (St. Mary)

TIDENHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chepstow, hundred of Westbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (N. E.) from Chepstow; containing 1407 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated at the extremity of a peninsula bounded by the Wye and the Severn, comprises about 6000 acres, and is divided into the six hamlets of Churchend, Bishton, Sedbury, Beachley, Wibdon, and Stroat. The Severn is crossed at Beachley by the old Passage ferry, which has been lately much improved. Sedbury Park, the property of George Ormerod, Esq., is in the parish; within the grounds is the southern termination of Offa's Dyke, which passes through the estate, and over Buttingdon Hill, to a lofty cliff overhanging the Severn near its confluence with the Wye. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 14., and in the patronage of Highford Buit, Esq., with a net income of £441, and a handsome parsonagehouse in the Elizabethan style, lately built by the Rev. Henry S. Burr: the glebe consists of about 7 acres. The church is chiefly in the early and decorated styles, with a square tower; the font is of lead, ancient, and curiously sculptured. A church was erected in 1833 at Beachley, where is also a national school, built in 1840; and in 1841 a national school was erected at Tidenham. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Among the relics of antiquity are the ruins of a chapel, on a small rocky island near the confluence of the two rivers; the Akeman-street, crossing Sedbury in its line from Oldbury to Caerwent; and several Roman and Danish camps on the line of Offa's Dyke, in Churchend and Wibdon, some of which were occupied as stations during the civil war in the reign of Charles I.

Tideswell (St. John the Baptist)

TIDESWELL (St. John the Baptist), a markettown and parish, in the union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby; containing, with the chapelry of Wormhill, and the hamlets of Litton and Whetstone, 3043 inhabitants, of which number 1777 are in Tideswell township, 33 miles (N. N. W.) from Derby, and 160 (N. W. by N.) from London. The first account of this place is in Domesday book, in which it is described under the name Tiddeswall as a royal demesne having a chapel, which latter was given by King John to the canons of Lichfield. The town is situated in a valley, surrounded by some of the most barren lands in the county, on the road from Chesterfield to Manchester; the houses in general are of mean appearance. The inhabitants are supplied with good water from a small stream which flows through the town. The chief branches of trade are calico-weaving and raining. A market and two fairs were granted by Henry III., and confirmed by subsequent sovereigns; the market is on Wednesday, and fairs are held on March 24th, May 15th, the last Wednesday in July, the second Wednesday in September, and October 29th, for cattle and sheep.

The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield (the appropriators), valued in the king's books at £7. 0. 7½ net income, £150. The great tithes of Tideswell township have been commuted for £189, and the small for £14: the vicar has a glebe of 5 acres. The church is a remarkably fine cruciform structure, principally in the decorated English style, having an embattled tower at the west end with crocketed pinnacles. The chancel is separated from the nave by a light screen of carved oak, and from the vestry-room by an embattled stone screen enriched with tracery. In the south transept is a tombstone to the memory of John Foljambe, who contributed largely to the erection of the church, in 1358. In the chancel is an altar-tomb, ornamented with brasses, to the memory of Sampson Meverell, who served under the Duke of Bedford in France, and was knighted upon the field at St. Luce. Another altar-tomb records the death of Robert Pursglove, a native of this town, prior of Gisburn Abbey, and bishop of Hull, who died May 2nd, 1579. At Wormhill is a separate incumbency. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Roman Catholics: also a free grammar school founded in 1560, under letters-patent from Queen Elizabeth, by the above-mentioned Robert Pursglove, and endowed with land producing £227 per annum, one-fourth of which has generally been distributed among the poor.

Tidmarsh (St. Lawrence)

TIDMARSH (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Bradfield, hundred of Theale, county of Berks, 6 miles (W. N. W.) from Reading; containing 146 inhabitants, and comprising 754a. 2r. 3p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 2. 6., and in the gift of Robert Hopkins, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £220; the glebe contains 28¾ acres. The church is partly Norman, and partly in the early English style; the doorway is a particularly fine specimen of Norman architecture: the ceiling of the chancel is of panelled oak, and there are two slabs of blue marble, with some ancient brasses.

Tidmington

TIDMINGTON, a parish, in the union of Shipstonupon-Stour, Upper division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Blockley and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, but locally in the Kington division of the hundred of Kington, county of Warwick, 1½ mile (S. by E.) from Shipston; containing 70 inhabitants, and comprising 754a. 1r. 12p. of land. Tidmington and Shipston, townships or chapelries in the parish of Tredington, were separated by act of parliament, in the 6th of George I., and made distinct; on which occasion the rectory of the old parish was divided into three parts. The rectory of Tidmington is annexed to that of Shipston: the church is partly in the early English style.

Tidworth, North (Holy Trinity)

TIDWORTH, NORTH (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Andover, hundred of Amesbury, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts, 2½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Ludgershall; containing 417 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 17. 1., and in the patronage of the Crown: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £324; a sum of £30 is paid to the Dean and Chapter of Winchester, and the glebe contains 14 acres. An almshouse was endowed with a rent-charge of £21 by Dr. Thomas Price, in 1689. North-west of the village, on the summit of an isolated hill, is the large earthwork called Chidbury Camp, in form resembling a heart. Robert Maton, a celebrated divine, was born here about 1607.

Tidworth, South (St. Mary)

TIDWORTH, SOUTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Ludgershall; containing, with the hamlet of Hampshire-Cross, 254 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 15. 2½., and in the gift of T. A. Smith, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £398, and the glebe contains 36 acres.

Tiffield (St. John)

TIFFIELD (St. John), a parish, in the union and hundred of Towcester, S. division of the county of Northampton, 2¾ miles (N. by E.) from Towcester; containing 146 inhabitants. The road from Northampton to Towcester passes in the vicinity. The parish consists of 1221½ acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 9. 7.; net income, £175; patron, the Rev. J. T. Flesher. The tithes were commuted for land and annual money payments in 1780.

Tilbrook (All Saints)

TILBROOK (All Saints), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Stodden, county of Bedford, l½ mile (N. W. by W.) from Kimbolton; containing 319 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 10.; net income, £388, with a house; patron, Lord St. John. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents, under an inclosure act, in the 39th and 40th of George III.

Tilbury, East (St. Margaret)

TILBURY, EAST (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 18 miles (S. E. by E.) from Romford; containing 311 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2136 acres, of which 71 are common or waste. It is bounded on the south-east by a part of the Thames called the Hope, where was an ancient ferry, said to be the place where Claudius crossed the river in pursuit of the Britons. On Hope Point is a battery for the defence of the river below Tilbury Fort. The lofty tower of the manorhouse of Gossalyne, here, was battered down by the Dutch fleet which ascended the Thames in the reign of Charles II. The parish comprises 2112 acres, nearly equally divided between arable and pasture, the latter including about 70 acres of saltings. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriator, the Rev. E. Lloyd. The great tithes have been commuted for £382, and the vicarial for £242; the impropriate glebe contains 28½ acres.

Tilbury-Juxta-Clare

TILBURY-JUXTA-CLARE, a parish, in the union of Halstead, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from Castle-Hedingham; containing 276 inhabitants. This parish derives the affix to its name from its proximity to Clare in Suffolk. It is about five miles in circumference, and is intersected by a rivulet that has its source in the adjoining parish of Ridgwell; the soil is moderately fertile, and the lands are in a good state of cultivation. The living is a rectory, consolidated with that of Ovington, and valued in the king's books at £8: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £260. 15.; £12 are paid to the rector of Great Yeldham, and the glebe contains 16 acres. The church is an ancient stone edifice, with a tower of brick.

Tilbury, West (St. James)

TILBURY, WEST (St. James), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 3¾ miles (E.) from Grays-Thurrock; containing 516 inhabitants. According to Bede, Tilbury or Tillaburgh was the seat of Bishop Cedda, when, about 630, he was engaged in baptizing the East Saxons. Tilbury Fort, partly in this parish and partly in that of Chadwell, was originally a block-house, built in the reign of Henry VIII.; but after the memorable attack of the Dutch fleet upon the shipping in the Medway, in 1667, it was converted into a regular fortification, to which considerable additions have since been made. The fort is encompassed by a deep wide fosse, and its ramparts present formidable batteries of heavy ordnance, particularly towards the river. It contains comfortable barracks, and other accommodations for the garrison, which consists of a fort-major and a detachment of invalids. The parish is bounded on the south by the Thames, and comprises 1830 acres, of which 118 are common or waste: the surface is elevated, and the soil light and gravelly, in the northern parts; the marsh lands in the vicinity of the river are stiff and clayey. Tilbury lies directly opposite to Gravesend, with which town and the interior of Kent there is a constant traffic by means of ferry-boats. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £577. 10.; the glebe contains 47½ acres. The church is an ancient edifice; its lofty embattled tower fell down some time since, and was replaced with a belfry-turret and spire of wood. In a chalk hill near the village are several caverns termed Danes' Holes, curiously constructed of stone, narrow at the entrance, and very spacious at the depth of thirty feet. Some traces of a camp formed in the neighbourhood, to oppose the invasion of the Spanish Armada, are still visible. Two mineral springs were discovered in the last century, the water of one of which was much celebrated a few years since; but they have now both fallen into disuse.

Tildesley, Lancashire.—See Tyldesley.

TILDESLEY, Lancashire.—See Tyldesley.

Tilehurst (St. Michael)

TILEHURST (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bradfield, hundred of Reading, county of Berks, 2¾ miles (W.) from Reading; containing, with Theale, 2147 inhabitants. This parish has the river Thames on the north, and the Kennet on the south; and is intersected by the Great Western railway. It has been divided by act of parliament into two parts, of which one constitutes the sub-parish of Theale. The whole comprises 6205a. 3r. 3p.; about 3393 acres are arable, 920 pasture, and 401 woodland. The living is composed of a rectory and vicarage, united in 1586, valued in the king's books at £21. 15. 2½., and in the patronage of Mrs. Sophia Sheppard. The church is a plain brick structure, containing some ancient brasses, and a sumptuous monument to the memory of Sir Peter Vanlore, Knt., who died in 1627. A church was erected at Theale in 1830. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Richard Lloyd, the learned Bishop of Worcester, was born here in 1627.

Tilford

TILFORD, with Culverlands, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Farnham, W. division of Surrey, 3 miles (S. E.) from Farnham; containing 509 inhabitants. Here is a place of worship in connexion with the Establishment.

Tilley

TILLEY, a township, in the parish and union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 1 mile (S.) from Wem; containing 333 inhabitants.

Tilley-Down

TILLEY-DOWN, a hamlet, in the parish of Appleshaw, union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 52 inhabitants.

Tillingham (St. Nicholas)

TILLINGHAM (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 14 miles (E. by S.) from Maldon; containing 1106 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the seashore, and comprises 4135a. 3r. 29p., whereof 2973 acres are arable, and 1123 grass. The surface rises gradually from the marshes till it attains a considerable elevation; the lands are watered by numerous fine springs, and the soil is generally fertile. The living is a vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London (the appropriators), valued in the king's books at £25. 3. 9.: the great tithes have been commuted for £797. 17., and the vicarial for £335. 15.; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe comprises 12 acres. The church was rebuilt, at the expense of the inhabitants, in the year 1708.

Tillington

TILLINGTON, a township, in the parish of Burghill, hundred of Grimsworth, union and county of Hereford, 5 miles (N. W. by N.) from Hereford; containing 462 inhabitants.

Tillington

TILLINGTON, a township, in the united parishes of St. Mary and St. Chad, Stafford, union of Stafford, S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, N. division of the county of Stafford, l½ mile (N. N. W.) from Stafford; containing 55 inhabitants. It comprises 956 acres, consisting of three farms. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £112. 15.

Tillington

TILLINGTON, a parish, in the union of Midhurst, hundred of Rotherbridge, rape of Artjndel, W. division of Sussex, 1 mile (W.) from Petworth; containing 949 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south by the Rother navigation, and comprises 3765a. 2r. 35p., of which the portion under tillage, including orchards, contains 2112 acres, the meadow and pasture 673, woods, hedge plantations, &c, 714 acres, and the commons 238 acres. The soil is chiefly a mellow brown earth, but in some places is altogether clayey; the surface is in general hilly. Here are some very extensive quarries of stone of good quality for building and other purposes. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 10., and in the gift of Col. Wyndham: the tithes have been commuted for £740; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe comprises 22 acres. The body of the church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1837, at the expense of the Earl of Egremont; the tower had been erected by the earl in 1808, in imitation of the tower of St. Dunstan's-in-the-East, London. In the hamlet of River was formerly a chapel; and some years since, a stone coffin was dug up there, which is now used as a trough for water. An almshouse for six persons was built chiefly from a bequest of the Styles family, now extinct; and in 1839, Col. Wyndham erected houses for two persons, and endowed them with £20 per annum. Dr. J. S. Clark, chaplain and librarian at Carlton-House, and author of the Life of Nelson, was rector of the parish.

Tilmanstone (St. Andrew)

TILMANSTONE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Eastry, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 6 miles (W. by S.) from Deal; containing 445 inhabitants. It comprises 1124 acres, of which 25 are in wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 6.; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of Canterbury. The great tithes have been commuted for £160, and the vicarial for £263; there is a vicarage-house, and the appropriate glebe contains 27¼ acres.



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