Tremayne - Treyford

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

390-392

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'Tremayne - Treyford', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 390-392. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51353 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Tremayne

TREMAYNE, a parish, in the union of Launceston, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall, 6¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Launceston; containing 107 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to that of Egloskerry: the tithes have been commuted for £83. 14.

Treneglos (St. Werburgh)

TRENEGLOS (St. Werburgh), a parish, in the union of Launceston, hundred of Lesnewth, E. division of Cornwall, 7½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Camelford; containing 192 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2362 acres, of which 700 are common or waste land; the surface is hilly, and the soil light. The living is a vicarage, with that of Warbstow annexed, valued in the king's books at £9. 9. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown in right of the duchy of Cornwall; net income, £187; impropriator, the Earl of St. Germans. The great tithes of Treneglos have been commuted for £63.15., and the vicarial for £90; there is a parsonagehouse, and the glebe contains 20 acres. On the moors are several ancient barrows.

Trent (St. Andrew)

TRENT (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Sherborne, hundred of Horethorne, E. division of Somerset, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Sherborne; containing 505 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 1590 acres, of which 460 are arable, and 943 pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 5. 5., and in the gift of Corpus Christi College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £460; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 48 acres. The church, in the later English style, has a tower at the south-east corner, surmounted by an hexagonal spire, and contains 355 sittings. A chapel at Adbeer, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was demolished in the civil war. John Young, in I678, bequeathed £1000 for the erection and endowment of a free school; the annual income is about £95.

Trentham (St. Mary)

TRENTHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Stone, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford; containing, with the two chapelries or parishes of Blurton with Lightwood-Forest, and Handford, and the townships of Butterton, ClaytonGriffith, and Handchurch, 2567 inhabitants, of whom 655 are in Trentham township, 4 miles (S. S. E.) from Newcastle. This place, anciently Trichingham, at a very early period of the Saxon era had a small nunnery, of which St. Werburga, sister of Ethelred, King of Mercia, was abbess. She died in 683, and the establishment appears to have subsequently gone to decay; but in the 12th century it was refounded as a priory, for canons of the order of St. Augustine, by the second Earl of Chester; and its possessions were augmented by several of his successors, so that at its dissolution in the reign of Henry VIII., it was valued at £121. 3. 2. per annum. The revenue arose chiefly from land in the vicinity, which was granted by the king to William, Duke of Suffolk, and which was subsequently purchased, together with the site of the priory, by the Leveson family, whose heiress carried their large possessions to the family of Gower. The parish, which altogether comprises 7236a. 1r. 3p. of land, was lately divided into three distinct and separate parishes, under the 16th section of the act 58th George III. The Trent and Mersey canal passes through the district, and the road from Newcastle to Stone also intersects it. The village is small but handsome, and lies on the east bank of the river Trent, whence the name of the parish.

Trentham Hall, the superb mansion of the Duke of Sutherland, is delightfully situated near the village and the river. It was erected somewhat more than a century ago, after the model of the then Buckingham House, in St. James' Park; but was considerably altered and improved by the first Marquess of Stafford, from the chaste and elegant designs of Holland, who gave new and magnificent features to the whole. The building is constructed chiefly of brick, the front being covered with Egyptian cement, similar to stone; the interior harmonizes with the splendid exterior, and the fine suite of state apartments contain a most valuable collection of paintings, though his grace's picture-gallery is at his town residence. The park comprises 500 acres, with extensive gardens and pleasure-grounds. The river expands within it into a fine lake, whose banks are in some places thickly covered with trees, that hang over the margin of the water, and produce a picturesque effect. Near the eastern side of the mansion is an orangery, close to which the lake is crossed by a handsome iron bridge of one arch 90 feet in span.

The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £113; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Sutherland. The church, which was originally a part of the monastery already mentioned, stands close to the Hall, and is a small edifice accommodating about 450 persons: the tower was taken down about a century since. Besides this church and the churches of Blurton and Handford, is an incumbency at Butterton. Near the high road is a mausoleum erected by the late duke as the family cemetery, a massive pyramidal pile of stone, two stories in height, the upper part having a bell, and surmounted by a cross: in the interior are twenty catacombs on each side, faced with marble, and an apartment for the funeral service. Lady Katharine Leveson in 1670 left £400 for instruction; the interest, £20 yearly, is paid by the duke to a schoolmaster, who teaches all the poor children of the parish at reduced charges. The same lady left £30 per annum towards clothing and maintaining three widows, and £20 a year for apprenticing boys. There are several other charities. Trentham gives the title of Viscount to the Duke of Sutherland.

Trentishoe (St. Peter)

TRENTISHOE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Barnstaple, hundred of Braunton, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 10 miles (E. by N.) from Ilfracombe; containing 132 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north by the Bristol Channel, and comprises 1300 acres, of which 650 are common or waste. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 8. 4., and has a net income of £118; it is in the patronage of Mrs. A. W. Griffiths. The glebe contains 35 acres. The church is a very small edifice.

Trent-Vale

TRENT-VALE, an ecclesiastical district, in the township of Penkhull, parish and union of Stokeupon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (S. E.) from Newcastle; containing about 800 inhabitants. The district is bounded on the eastern and south-eastern sides by the Trent, and on the western side by the Lyme. It lies on the road from Newcastle to Stone; and the Newcastle canal passes through. The soil is a good stiff clay, and the scenery very picturesque. Bricks, roofing-tiles, and a material for flooring, are made here in great quantities from a peculiar kind of clay, affording employment to about 250 persons. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rector of Stoke, with an income of £100 from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The church, dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, is a cruciform structure in the early English style, built in 1844, at a cost of £1230, on a site given by Thomas Fenton, Esq., of Stoke Lodge: it contains 398 sittings, of which 286 are free. This is the third church erected in the township, the others being at Penkhull and Hartshill. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists; and attached to the church is a national school.

Treprenal

TREPRENAL, a township, in the parish of Llanymynech, hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, 5 miles (S.) from Oswestry; with 21 inhabitants.

Trescott, with Pirton.—See Pirton.

TRESCOTT, with Pirton.—See Pirton.

Tresham

TRESHAM, a chapelry, in the parish of Hawkesbury, union of Chipping-Sodbury, Upper division of the hundred of Grumbald's-Ash, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 3½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Wotton-under-Edge; containing 296 inhabitants. The tithes were partially commuted for land in 1818.

Tresmeer (St. Nicholas)

TRESMEER (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Launceston, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall, 7½ miles (W. by N.) from Launceston; containing 182 inhabitants. It comprises 1344 acres, of which 108 are common or waste. The river Ottery separates the parish on the north from that of North Petherwin, and the road from Launceston to Camelford passes through it. Stone is quarried for building, and there are mines of manganese, but not at present worked. A small fair for cattle and sheep is held on the 20th of July. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £85; it is in the patronage of the Crown. The tithes have been commuted for £130. The church was erected about the year 1486, and is now much dilapidated. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Treswell (St. John the Baptist)

TRESWELL (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of East Retford, South-Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (E. by S.) from East Retford; containing 228 inhabitants. The parish consists of 1721 acres: the soil is a fertile clay, except at the east end, where it joins the Trent marsh and is sandy. The living is a rectory, formerly in two portions, which were united in 1764; the eastern is valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 4., and the western at £9. 15. 8.: net income, £254; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of York. The church is ancient, with a lofty embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Tretilla

TRETILLA, a township, in the parish of Llangarran, poor-law union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford; containing 132 inhabitants.

Tretire (St. Mary)

TRETIRE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 5¾ miles (W.) from Ross; containing 135 inhabitants, and comprising 1326 acres. The living is a rectory, with the rectory of MichaelChurch united, valued in the king's books at £6. 1. 8., and in the gift of Guy's Hospital, London: the tithes of Tretire have been commuted for £259. 12., and there is a parsonage-house, with a glebe of 2 acres.

Trevalga

TREVALGA, a parish, in the union of Camelford, hundred of Lesnewth, E. division of Cornwall, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Camelford; containing 184 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north-west by the Bristol Channel, and comprises by admeasurement 1290 acres, of which one-third is pasture, and about. 150 acres furze and coarse land; the surface is hilly, and the soil various. There are some quarries of slate. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 0½.; net income, £146; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Exeter: the glebe consists of about 20 acres. The church contains 300 sittings.

Trevena.—See Bossiney with Trevena.

TREVENA.—See Bossiney with Trevena.

Trevethan (St. Cadocus)

TREVETHAN (St. Cadocus), a parish, in the union and division of Pont-y-Pool, hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth; containing, with the markettown of Pont-y-pool, 14,942 inhabitants. It comprises 8212 acres, of which 4095 are common or waste. The Monmouthshire and Brecon canals, and numerous tramroads, pass through. The inhabitants are employed in the extensive mines of iron and coal with which the neighbourhood abounds; in burning lime; and in the large iron-works at Pont-y-Pool and in its vicinity. The British Mining Company established furnaces at the Varteage, three miles from Pont-y-Pool, and buildings for the overseers and workmen were erected in almost every direction; but these works were lately stopped. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Bishop of Llandaff. The church, a very ancient building, was pulled down in the early part of 1846, and a new edifice forthwith erected. There is a separate incumbency at Pont-y-Pool, and churches have been erected at Aberyschan and Pontnewyndd, both which are presented to by the incumbent of Trevethan. Charles Price, in 1826, bequeathed £200, the interest to be appropriated in supplying bread to the poor.

Treville

TREVILLE, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Dore, Upper division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 6½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Ross; containing 101 inhabitants, and comprising an area of 1560 acres.

Trewarlet

TREWARLET, a hamlet, in the parish of Lezant, union of Launceston, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall; with 47 inhabitants.

Trewen (St. Michael)

TREWEN (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Launceston, N. division of the hundred of East, E. division of Cornwall, 5¼ miles (W. by S.) from Launceston; containing 221 inhabitants. The living is a joint vicarage with South Petherwin: the great tithes of the parish have been commuted for £67, and the small for £47. Fairs for colts, sheep, and lambs, are held on May 1st and October 10th.

Trewhitt

TREWHITT, a township, in the parish and union of Rothbury, W. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland; containing 130 inhabitants. High Trewhitt is 4¼ miles (N. W.) and Low Trewhitt 4½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Rothbury. These places were in the time of James I. possessed by Sir Ephraim Widdrington: the family of Clavering held the former in the reign of Charles I., but forfeited it by their attachment to the Stuarts. Low Trewhitt lies at the foot of a declivity, on the west side of the Wreigh burn; while High Trewhitt is seated on an eminence about a mile to the north-east.

Trewick

TREWICK, a township, in the parish of Bolam, union and W. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 7½ miles (S. W.) from Morpeth; containing 21 inhabitants. This place was a member of the barony of Bolam, and in 1240 was holden of it by the soccage service of half a mark by Robert de Trewick, of whose family notices continue to occur till the 14th century: of subsequent owners have been the families of Bekering, Loraine, and Middleton. The township occupies the north side of the Blyth river, and comprises 708 acres. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £61. 19., and the vicarial for £9. 9. 6.

Treyford

TREYFORD, a parish, in the union of Midhurst, hundred of Dumpford, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Midhurst; containing 155 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 1., and annexed to that of Elstead. Contiguous to the Downs are several circular and conical barrows.