Tubney - Tunstall

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

398-401

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'Tubney - Tunstall', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 398-401. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51356 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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Tubney

TUBNEY, a parish, in the union of Abingdon, hundred of Ock, county of Berks, 4¼ miles (W. by N.) from Abingdon; containing 190 inhabitants, and comprising 1124a. 2r. 36p. The living is a sinecure rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 1. 10½., and in the gift of Magdalen College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £147. 10., and the glebe contains 10 acres. The church has been demolished, and on the induction of a rector, the ceremony takes place in the open air. The parishioners attend Fyfield church.

Tuckton

TUCKTON, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Christchurch, Ringwood and Southern divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 172 inhabitants.

Tuddenham (St. Martin)

TUDDENHAM (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, hundred of Carlford, E. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) from Ipswich; containing 423 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 1232 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 13. 4.; patron, Mrs. Lillingston. The great tithes have been commuted for £220, the vicarial for £110, and there are three acres of glebe. The north doorway of the church is a richly-moulded Norman arch; the font has the date 1363 inscribed on it.

Tuddenham (St. Mary)

TUDDENHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mildenhall, hundred of Lackford, W. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) from Mildenhall; containing 428 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 2583 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 17. 6., and in the gift of the Marquess of Bristol: the tithes have been commuted for £360; the glebe comprises 17 acres. John Cockerton, in 1723, founded a free school, and endowed it with an estate now producing a rental of £70.

Tuddenham, East (All Saints)

TUDDENHAM, EAST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Mitford, W. division of Norfolk, 8½ miles (W. N. W.) from Norwich; containing 556 inhabitants. It comprises 2065a. 3r. 35p., of which 1629 acres are arable, 359 meadow and pasture, and 44 woodland: the village is pleasantly situated on the road from Norwich to Mattishall. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to that of Honingham, and valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 0½.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £168, and the vicarial for £415; the glebe contains 102 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower; the east window is embellished with stained glass representing the Descent from the Cross and other scriptural subjects, inserted at the expense of Mrs. Mellish. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. At the inclosure of the parish, twenty-four acres were allotted for fuel to the poor, who have also £40 per annum arising from several bequests.

Tuddenham, North and West (St. Mary)

TUDDENHAM, NORTH and WEST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Mitford, W. division of Norfolk, 4¼ miles (E. by S.) from East Dereham; containing 417 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Norwich to East Dereham, and comprises 2270a. 1r. 8p., of which 1706 acres are arable, 469 meadow and pasture, and 41 woodland. Tuddenham Hall, formerly the seat of the Skippe family, an ancient brick mansion surrounded with a moat, is now a farmhouse. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 5. 5., and in the gift of Robert Barry, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £680; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 65 acres.

Tudely (All Saints)

TUDELY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Tonbridge, partly in the hundred of Twyford, but chiefly in that of Washlingstone, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from Tonbridge; containing 643 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1593a. 1r. 6p., about 50 acres of which are hop-grounds: the South-Eastern railway passes through it. The living is a vicarage, held jointly with the vicarage of Capel, valued in the king's books at £4. 16. 0½., and in the patronage of the Baroness le Despencer; net income, £238. The church is a small building of stone, with a square tower of brick, and a spire. In the parish are some mineral springs having the same properties as those of Tonbridge-Wells. Here was a seat of the earls of Westmoreland, now a farmhouse.

Tuderley, Hampshire.—See Tytherley.

TUDERLEY, Hampshire.—See Tytherley.

Tudhoe

TUDHOE, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Whitworth, S. E. division of Darlington ward, union, and S. division of the county, of Durham, 5 miles (S. by W.) from Durham; containing 327 inhabitants. This township, anciently called Tudhowe, comprises by computation 1770 acres of land. The village, which is reputed as being very healthy, is pleasantly situated near the source of a brook, about a mile south of the river Wear. The tithes have been commuted for £167.13. 3., payable to the rector of Brancepetb.

Tudy, St

TUDY, ST., a parish, in the union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, E. division of Cornwall, 6¼ miles (N.) from Bodmin; containing 661 inhabitants. Fairs for sheep and cattle are held on May 20th and September 14th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £31; net income, £700; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church contains several ancient monuments to the Nichols family, of Penrose, in the parish. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and at Tintern and Kelly-Green are the remains of ancient chapels. Dr. Richard Lower, an eminent physician in the time of Charles II., who first brought into notice the mineral water at Astrop, in Northamptonshire, and who is mentioned in Dr. Good's Study of Medicine, as having either discovered or brought to perfection the practice of transfusing blood, was born at Tremere, in the parish, about 1631, and was interred at his native place in 1690.

Tue-Brook

TUE-BROOK, a hamlet, in the township of West Derby, parish of Walton-on-the-Hill, union and hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire, 3 miles (N. E.) from Liverpool, on the road to Knowsley. This locality, from its elevated situation and the salubrity of the air, is chiefly inhabited by Liverpool merchants, whose numerous mansions and villas adorn the scenery. Tue-Brook Villa is an elegant building in the Italian style; it is appropriated to insane persons of the wealthy classes. (See Derby, West.) Here is a powerful steam-engine connected with the Green-Lane Waterworks, which partly supply the town of Liverpool.

Tuffley

TUFFLEY, a hamlet, in the parish of St. Maryde-Lode, city of Gloucester, Middle division of the hundred of Dudstone and King's-Barton, union, and E. division of the county, of Gloucester, 2¼ miles (S.by W.) from Gloucester; containing 107 inhabitants, and comprising 770 acres, of which 50 are common or waste land.

Tufton, or Tuckington (St. Mary)

TUFTON, or Tuckington (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Whitchurch, hundred of Wherwell, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, ½ a mile (S. W.) from Whitchurch; containing 153 inhabitants. It comprises about 1500 acres; the surface is hilly, and the soil rests upon chalk and gravel. The living is annexed, with that of Bullington, to the vicarage of Wherwell.

Tugby (St. Thomas à Becket)

TUGBY (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, partly in the hundred of Gartree, but chiefly in that of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 7 miles (W. by N.) from Uppingham; containing, with the liberty of Keythorpe, 288 inhabitants. This parish, which forms some of the highest land in the county, is situated on the road from Leicester to Stamford, and comprises about 2000 acres. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of East Norton annexed, valued in the king's books at £11. 8. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown. The tithes were partly commuted for land in 1784, and under the recent act a commutation has taken place for a rentcharge of £147. 8.; the glebe contains 137 acres. The church has been repewed. Robert Wilson in 1726 bequeathed some land, directing the produce to be applied for teaching children, and the relief of poor persons. Catherine Parker, in 1746, left £50 per annum to be distributed among three widows, two of this place and one of East Norton. £23 per annum, derived from land apportioned at the inclosure, are applied to apprenticing children; and the sum of £7. 5., derived from land purchased with bequests, is distributed among the poor.

Tugford (St. Catherine)

TUGFORD (St. Catherine), a parish, in the union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 10 miles (N. N. E.) from Ludlow; containing 145 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Holdgate, and valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.: the tithes have been commuted for £180; the glebe contains 23 acres.

Tuggal, or Tughall

TUGGAL, or Tughall, a township, in the parish, and N. division of the ward, of Bambrough, union of Belford, N. division of Northumberland, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Embleton; containing 119 inhabitants. It is situated at the southern extremity of the parish, near Tuggal burn, which shortly falls into the sea; and comprises about 1500 acres of good wheat land and excellent pasture, in the proportions of two-thirds of the former and one-third of the latter. At a little distance eastward from the village stands Tuggal Hall. Here is a chapel in ruins.

Tumby

TUMBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Revesby, union of Horncastle, W. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Bolingbroke; with 12 inhabitants.

Tumby

TUMBY, a township, in the parish of Kirkby-uponBain, union of Horncastle, S. division of the wapentake of Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2½ miles (N. E by N.) from Tattershall; containing 344 inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists. Under the will of Sir John Nelthorpe, Bart., in 1669, a moiety of his bequest to the school of Glandford-Brigg is appropriated to providing lodging, diet, clothing, and books for the poor of Fullsby, in this township, and for those of Legsby.

Tunbridge, county Kent.—See Tonbridge.

TUNBRIDGE, county Kent.—See Tonbridge.

Tunstall

TUNSTALL, a township, in the parish of BishopWearmouth, union of Sunderland, N. division of Easington ward and of the county of Durham, 2¾ miles (S. by W.) from Sunderland; containing 64 inhabitants. The township lies between the road from Sunderland to Durham, and that from Sunderland to Stockton; and comprises about 760 acres, mostly arable land. It is chiefly remarkable for the hills named after it, which form one of the most prominent features of the district, being a long monotonous chain or ridge of limestone, running from north to south, and terminating in two depressed round summits; the eastern ascent is tame and gradual, but the western rises rapidly from a deep and romantic gill. From these hills fine views of the sea and of Sunderland are presented; and they form a good landmark for mariners. Imbedded in the limestone have been found fossils, and a considerable quantity of iron-ore. There are some vestiges of a Druidical circle; and a rude sepulchre, constructed with fragments of stone, was discovered in 1814. The tithes have been commuted for £182. 15. 3. A division of waste lands took place in 1671.

Tunstall (St. John the Baptist)

TUNSTALL (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union and hundred of Milton, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 1½ mile (S. W. by W.) from Sittingbourne; containing 188 inhabitants. It comprises 1179a. 25p., of which 627 acres are arable, 291 pasture, 229 woodland, and 15 in hop-grounds; the soil is loamy, with a considerable admixture of flint, and rests on chalk. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 8. 4., and in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury: the tithes have been commuted for £510, and there is a glebe-house, with 9½ acres of land. The church is principally in the later English style, is built of flint, and has several handsome monuments. Edward Rowe Mores, a distinguished antiquary, was born here in 1730.

Tunstall (St. John the Baptist)

TUNSTALL (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire; containing, with the chapelry of Leek, and the townships of Burrow with Burrow, and Cantsfield, 721 inhabitants, of whom 142 are in Tunstall township, 3¾ miles (S.) from KirkbyLonsdale. This is the Tunestalle of the Domesday survey. It was early held by a family of the local name, a member of which, Sir Bryan Tunstall, was killed in the battle of Flodden-Field, and is called in Sir Walter Scott's Marmion, "the Stainless Knight." The family occupied Thurland Castle, a place of great antiquity, restored by the present, proprietor. The parish comprises 13,840 acres, of which 1076a. 1r. 13p. are in the township of Tunstall. The course of the river Lune here forms a direct line from north to south, and its banks are agreeably varied with groves and glades. The Greta, issuing from the adjoining county of York, enters Lancashire between Wrayton (in Melling) and Cantsfield, and after flowing to the south-south-west of Thurland Castle, terminates its career in the Lune. The bridge over this stream near the castle was rebuilt in 1817, but was so much injured by the destructive floods of the Greta, that it fell on the 16th December 1833; it was restored, however, in 1835-6. The Leek beck, a mountain torrent, rises near Graygirth fell; descends, by Leek and Cowan bridge, to Over Burrow; and flowing over immense beds of stone, falls into the Lune west of Burrow Hall. The road from Kirkby-Lonsdale to Lancaster passes through the parish.

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 11½.; net income, £332; patron and impropriator, R. T. North, Esq.: the great tithes of Tunstall township have been commuted for £62, and the small for £50; the vicar has a glebe of 12 acres. The church is a large irregular structure situated to the north-east of the village, comprising a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a tower and spacious porch, all in a nearly similar style of architecture. It is believed to be the third erection on the site, which may have been occupied, in the Saxon era, by one of the churches mentioned in Domesday book. The last rebuilding is ascribed to Sir Thomas Tunstall, who lived in the reigns of Henry IV. and V. The ceiling fell down from age and decay in 1826, but was replaced. At Leek is a separate incumbency. Twenty-four children receive education for about £26 a year, arising from bequests; and there are some other small charities.

Tunstall (St. Peter and St. Paul)

TUNSTALL (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Blofield, hundred of Walsham, E. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (S. S. E.) from Acle; containing 116 inhabitants, and comprising about 1600 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £70; patron, the Bishop of Norwich. The body of the church forms a picturesque ruin, the chancel only being fitted up for public worship.

Tunstall

TUNSTALL, a township, in the parish of Adbaston, union of Newport, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford; with 124 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £135.

Tunstall

TUNSTALL, a considerable modern town, and a district parish consisting of the townships of Oldcott, Tunstall, and Ranscliff, in the parish of Wolstanton, union of Wolstanton and Burslem, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Newcastle; containing 9240 inhabitants. In the township of Tunstall, which forms the northern extremity of the parliamentary borough of Stoke, are 6978 inhabitants. This place is seated on the declivity of a considerable eminence, about one mile north-by-east of Burslem, and has risen during the present century from the rank of a small village to that of a respectable town. The population in the year 1811 was only 1677. In 1816 a market-place was set out, and a town-hall, a neat building of brick, erected in the centre; and in 1840 an act was passed establishing a market, and vesting the profits in a body corporate as trustees for the original subscribers. In 1847 an act for paving, lighting, watching, and otherwise improving the town, and for regulating the market, was also obtained: the market is held on Monday and Saturday. The manufacture of china and earthenware is extensively carried on, there being in the vicinity nearly twenty potteries; and the population is likewise employed in collieries, ironstone-mines, and brick and tile works, the last producing articles of superior hardness and quality, in great demand in Lancashire and the northern parts. Goods are forwarded by the Grand Trunk canal, which has its summit level near the west side of the town, and is conducted into Cheshire in two collateral tunnels under Harecastle Hill, within half a mile north-west of the town: these tunnels are 2880 yards in length.

The township of Tunstall comprises only 795 acres, but the manor, of which Ralph Sneyd, Esq., of Keele Hall, is lord, comprehends also twelve contiguous townships, including Burslem. The church, dedicated to Christ, was erected in 1831, on a site given by Mr. Sneyd, at a cost of £4000, of which £3000 were a grant from the Parliamentary Commissioners, and £1000 were raised by subscription; it is in the early English style, with a tower and spire, and contains 1000 sittings. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Mr. Sneyd, and incumbency of the Rev. S. Newall: a parsonagehouse has been built by subscription, aided by £400 from the late Col. Sneyd. There are places of worship for Wesleyan and Primitive Methodists (both large foundations, with school-houses attached), and Methodists of the New Connexion; also a Barker meeting-house. Excellent national schools were built in 1838.

Tunstall (St. Michael)

TUNSTALL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 8 miles (N. E. by E.) from Woodbridge; containing, with the hamlet of Dunningworth, 658 inhabitants, and an area by admeasurement of 3057 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Dunningworth annexed, valued in the king's books at £21. 0. 5.; net income, £352; patron and incumbent, the Rev. T. G. Ferrand. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Tunstall (All Saints)

TUNSTALL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Patrington, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness,E. riding of York, 5½ miles (N.) from Patrington; containing 159 inhabitants. This place is of considerable antiquity, a church existing here in 1115, when Stephen, Earl of Albemarle, gave the church and tithes of Tunstall to the abbey of St. Martin. The parish is bounded on the east by the sea, and comprises 1193a. 16p., of which 919 acres are arable, and 274 pasture: about 100 acres have been lost since the inclosure in 1777, by the encroachment of the waves. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Succentor of the Cathedral of York, with a net income of £52; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The tithes of the township were commuted for land and a money payment in 1777. The church, situated near the centre of the village, consists of a nave, north and south aisles, and chancel, with a tower; the elevation is lofty, and the edifice of very substantial erection.

Tunstall

TUNSTALL, a township, in the parish of Catterick, union of Richmond, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, 2 miles (S. W.) from Catterick; containing 314 inhabitants. It comprises about 1470 acres, divided among various proprietors: its scattered village is seated in a narrow vale, near the source and on both sides of a small rivulet. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.