Upton, Bishop's - Upwood

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

422-424

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'Upton, Bishop's - Upwood', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 422-424. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51364 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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Upton, Bishop's (St. John the Baptist)

UPTON, BISHOP'S (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Ross, hundred of Greytree, county of Hereford, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from Ross; containing 650 inhabitants. The parish embraces an elevated ridge of mountain, and consists of 3315 acres. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 17. 6.; net income, £708; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Hereford. The tithes have been commuted for £463. 16. to the Dean and Chapter, and £225. 11. to the vicar.

Upton-Cressett (St. Michael)

UPTON-CRESSETT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bridgnorth, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Bridgnorth; containing 56 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 15. 2½., and in the patronage of the representatives of the late J. C. Pelham, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £191. 7., and the glebe comprises 4 acres.

Upton-Gray

UPTON-GRAY, a parish, in the union of Basingstoke, hundred of Bermondspit, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from Odiham; containing, with the tything of Hoddington, 504 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Queen's College, Oxford: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £490, and there are 49 acres of impropriate glebe.

Upton-Hellions (St. Mary)

UPTON-HELLIONS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Crediton, hundred of West Budleigh, Crediton and N. divisions of Devon, 2 miles (N. N. E.) from Crediton; containing 146 inhabitants. The parish stretches along the northern bank of the river Creedy, and comprises by measurement about 800 acres: it has several quarries of stone suitable for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Rev. W. Wellington: the tithes have been commuted for £170, and there is a glebe of 40 acres. The church, a small neat building, supposed to have been erected in the 14th century, contains a handsome monument to the Reynell family.

Upton-Lovell

UPTON-LOVELL, a parish, in the union of Warminster, hundred of Heytesbury, Warminster and S. divisions of Wilts, 1½ mile (S. E. by E.) from Heytesbury; containing 235 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 1399a. 15p., is situated on the road from Heytesbury to Salisbury, and intersected by the river Wily. The manufacture of fine broad-cloth affords employment to about 400 persons of this and the adjoining villages. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 18. 11½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £329. 10., and the glebe comprises 30 acres. In the chancel of the church is a recumbent figure of Lord Lovel, from whom the parish derives its distinguishing appellation. The Rev. John Crouch, in 1794, bequeathed £500 three per cent, consols., the interest to be applied in teaching children. On Upton-Lovell down, about two miles from Heytesbury, is a single intrenchment called Knook Castle, including about two acres: on the summit of a hill north-west of Elder Valley, is Bowls Barrow, a large tumulus, that has been found to contain fourteen human skeletons; and in the neighbourhood of Knook Castle, near the north bank of the Wily, is another large barrow, which, from the number of gold ornaments discovered in it, has been termed Golden Barrow.

Upton Magna (St. Lucia)

UPTON MAGNA (St. Lucia), a parish, in the union of Atcham, Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 5¼ miles (E.) from Shrewsbury; containing 494 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3129a. 2r. 9p. of land, chiefly arable; a considerable hill on one side forms a rabbit-warren and sheep-walk, and the remainder is divided into farms: the soil is generally good, and under profitable cultivation. Coal and limestone are worked to a small extent. The Shrewsbury canal passes through the parish, and at one extremity is the river Severn. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12; net income, £546; patron, Mrs. Corbet. The church is an ancient structure in the early and later English styles, and consists of a square embattled tower, and a nave and chancel separated by a Norman arch; the windows have been filled with stained glass, presented by Miss Pigott.

Upton-Noble

UPTON-NOBLE, a parish, in the union of SheptonMallet, hundred of Bruton, E. division of Somerset, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Bruton; containing 241 inhabitants, and comprising 640 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the rectory of Batcombe. The church is ancient.

Upton-Pyne

UPTON-PYNE, a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of Wonford, Wonford and S. divisions of Devon, 3¼ miles (N. by W.) from Exeter; containing 512 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1800 acres by measurement; the river Eke bounds it on the south, and the Thorverton road passes immediately before the church. Some leather-mills here employ a few persons: manganese was produced in tolerable quantity about twenty years since, and the mine is still worked, but not with much success. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 6. 8., and in the gift of Sir S. H. Northcote, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe comprises about 90 acres, with a house. The church contains a good painting of the Last Supper, the monument of a crusader, and some remains of ancient stained glass.

Upton-Scudamore (St. Mary)

UPTON-SCUDAMORE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Warminster, Warminster and S. divisions of Wilts, 2 miles (N.) from Warminster; containing 383 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 7. 1., and in the gift of Queen's College, Oxford. The incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £480, with a glebe of nearly 23 acres; and certain impropriate tithes for £105, with a glebe of 23½ acres.

Upton-Snodsbury (St. Kenelme)

UPTON-SNODSBURY (St. Kenelme), a parish, in the union, and Upper division of the hundred, of Pershore, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 6 miles (E.) from Worcester; containing 340 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 1661a. 3r. 12p., of level surface, is intersected by the road from Worcester to Inkberrow; and the Birmingham and Gloucester railway passes at the distance of about two miles. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Henry Armel Green, M.A.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £100, the vicarial for £119. 13., and there are 2 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient structure with a tower, and contains a curious carved screen.

Upton-Upon-Severn (St. Peter and St. Paul)

UPTON-UPON-SEVERN (St. Peter and St. Paul), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the Lower division of the hundred of Pershore, Upton and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 10 miles (S.) from Worcester, and 109 (N. W. by W.) from London; containing 2696 inhabitants. According to Dr. Stukeley, this was the Upoessa of Ravennas; and the probability of its having been a Roman station is strengthened by the discovery of some ancient armour in the neighbourhood. During the civil war, a bridge of six arches, erected pursuant to legislative enactment in the reign of James I., was partly broken down, and a battery placed in the churchyard, to prevent the approach of Cromwell and his forces; but the plan was ineffectual, and the parliamentary troops entered the town. Upton is situated on the right bank of the river Severn, which is here navigable for vessels of 100 tons' burthen; it is neatly built, and the streets are well paved: the surrounding country is in a state of high cultivation, and the scenery is varied and picturesque. There is a subscription library. A considerable quantity of cider, brought from Herefordshire and other parts, is shipped here for conveyance to different places, there being a harbour for barges, with a wharf for loading and discharging. The market is on Thursday: a handsome market-house, including an assembly-room and apartments for the meetings of the magistrates, has been erected by subscription. Fairs are held on Mid-Lent and Whitsun Thursdays, July 10th, and the Thursday before October 2nd; a manorial court is held annually in October, and petty-sessions every alternate Thursday. The powers of the county debt-court of Upton, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Upton. The parish comprises 3003 acres of land, of which 300 are common or waste; the remainder is in equal portions of arable and pasture.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £27; net income, £917; patron, the Bishop of Worcester. The church is a handsome structure, erected, with the exception of the tower, in 1758; the ancient spire, from an apprehension of insecurity, was taken down, and a wooden cupola, covered with copper, substituted, in 1769. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. A charity school for 20 girls was endowed in 1718, by Richard and Anne Smith, with property now producing £28 per annum, which was augmented with a bequest of £5 a year, in 1824, by Miss Sarah Husband: a boys' school was added in 1797, by a benefaction from George King, which was vested in the purchase of £100 three per cents., and £100 four per cent, consols.; and these two foundations are now incorporated into a national school. Edward Hall, in 1578, left an estate at present worth about £80 a year, for maintaining a bridge here over the Severn; and Thomas Morris, alias Woodward, in 1675 bequeathed £185, which sum was invested in land, &c., now valued at £35. 10. per annum, for parochial purposes. The poor-law union comprises 22 parishes or places, and contains a population of 16,886. Dr. John Dee, the celebrated astrologer in the reign of Elizabeth, was a native of the town. The late Rev. J. Davison, B.D., author of some theological works, was rector.

Upton-Warren (St. Michael)

UPTON-WARREN (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Droitwich, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Droitwich and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Brornsgrove; containing 441 inhabitants. It is situated on the Birmingham and Worcester road, and comprises 2574a. 35p., of which 1600 acres are arable, 750 pasture, and 136 woodland; the surface is undulated, the soil partly a strong clay, and the scenery picturesque. The Stoke station on the Birmingham and Gloucester railway is one mile to the east. The river Salwarp or Warren propels a flour-mill here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 2. 3½., and in the patronage of the Earl of Shrewsbury: the tithes have been commuted for £670, and the glebe consists of 80 acres, with an excellent residence. The church, a plain edifice with a tower surmounted by a spire, was partly rebuilt in 1793, and has a neat interior. Here is a national school, endowed with £18 per annum by Elizabeth Lacey and others, in 1745; also a Church Sunday school. An annuity of £10 was bequeathed by Alderman Saunders to the Grocers' Company, London, for apprenticing a boy of this parish.

Upton-Waters (St. Michael)

UPTON-WATERS (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wellington, Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 5 miles (N. by W.) from Wellington; containing 228 inhabitants. This parish comprises by measurement 732 acres. It is separated by the river Tern from the parish of High Ercal; and the village, situated on elevated ground, is intersected by the road between Wellington and Market-Drayton. A common red stone is quarried for building purposes. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 17. 3½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £135, and the glebe comprises 35 acres. The church is a small neat edifice.

Up-Waltham, Sussex.—See Waltham, Up.

UP-WALTHAM, Sussex.—See Waltham, Up.

Upway (St. Lawrence)

UPWAY (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Weymouth, comprising the liberty of Weybey-house, the tything of Stottingway in the hundred of Culliford-Tree, and that of Elwell in the liberty of WykeRegis and Elwell, Dorchester division of Dorset, 4½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Dorchester; the whole containing 619 inhabitants. The liberty of Weybey-house and the manor of Upway belong to the Rev. George Gould, whose ancestors were seated here as early as the reign of James I.: part of the ancient manor-house is still remaining, but the family have for some years chiefly resided at Fleet, in this county. On the estate are some excellent quarries, from which the stone was taken for the new church at Fleet. The manor of Stottingway belongs to the vicars-choral of Salisbury cathedral. Near the church, at the foot of a steep hill, rises the small river Way, which runs through the parish, and falls into the sea at Weymouth. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 3. 1½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Salisbury: the tithes have been commuted for £380, and the glebe comprises 46½ acres. The church is ornamented with an embattled tower crowned by pinnacles, and has been enlarged. On Ridgway down are numerous barrows, extending from that part of the ridge opposite Sutton-Pointz to beyond Long Bredy, a distance of nearly six miles, in a direction parallel to the ancient Roman road called Via Iceniana.

Upwell (St. Peter)

UPWELL (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Wisbech, partly in the hundred of Wisbech, Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge, and partly in the hundred of Clackclose, W. division of the county of Norfolk, 65 miles (S. E. by S.) from Wisbech; containing, with part of the chapelry of Welney, 4891 inhabitants, of whom 4300 are in Upwell township. The village is intersected by the river Nene, and the houses extend along its banks nearly to Outwell and Welney. The country about Welney, which lies in the cultivated fens of the Great Bedford Level, has been much improved within the last thirty years. A handsome suspension-bridge was erected over the Hundred-Foot river in 1826, at the expense of the Rev. W. G. Townley, the rector, from a design by Capt. Sir Samuel Brown. King John granted a market on Wednesday, and Henry VI. an annual fair; the former has been discontinued, and the latter is now only a pleasure-fair. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16; net income, £3855; patron, R. G. Townley, Esq. The church, which, with the greater part of the parish, is in Norfolk, is a handsome edifice in the later English style, and has a tower, the upper part octagonal, surmounted by a lofty spire. The Rev. Mr. Townley repewed it chiefly at his own expense, and erected galleries, in 1839, and more recently put up a beautiful east window of stained glass, representing the Descent from the Cross. The reading-desk and pulpit, and other portions of the edifice, are finely carved. In the chancel are several neat monuments, two sepulchral brasses, and a brass plate recording the death of 67 persons here between June 21st and August 13th, 1832, by cholera. At Welney is a chapel of ease. There are places of worship for Baptists and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. The poor have £180 per annum, derived from land left by various individuals. In that part of the parish lying in Cambridgeshire are the sites of two religious houses, one of which, at Mirmound, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was founded by Richard I., and at the Dissolution was valued at £10. 7. 7.; the other, a small priory of Gilbertines, also dedicated to the Virgin, was a cell to the house of Sempringham, valued at £13. 6. 1.

Upwood (St. Peter)

UPWOOD (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Hurstingstone, union and county of Huntingdon, 2¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Ramsey; containing 378 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Great Raveley annexed, in the patronage of Miss Bickerton, and has a net income of £78: the tithes have been commuted for £340. Robert Gordon and Anthony Ashton, in 1660, gave some land now let for £10 per annum, for parochial purposes.



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