Weighton, Little - Welham

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

498-499

Citation Show another format:

'Weighton, Little - Welham', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 498-499. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51385 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Weighton, Little

WEIGHTON, LITTLE, a hamlet, in the parish of Rowley, union of Beverley, Hunsley-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing 198 inhabitants. It lies detached from any high road, and consists chiefly of a long sequestered valley, at the extremity of which is a village of the same name. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Weighton, Market (All Saints)

WEIGHTON, MARKET (All Saints), a markettown and parish, in the union of Pocklington, HolmeBeacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing, with Shipton chapelry, 2269 inhabitants, of whom 1947 are in the town, 19 miles (E. S. E.) from York, and 190 (N. by W.) from London. This town is situated at the western foot of the Wolds, on the river Foulness, and on the road from York to Hull, from which places it is equi-distant. It is progressively improving, its trade having been considerably increased by the construction of a canal to the Humber: a railway was opened to Selby, and another to York, both in the latter part of 1847. The surface of the parish is undulated, the scenery picturesque, and the soil partly chalk and partly clay. The market is on Wednesday; and fairs are held on May 14th and Sept. 25th, for horses, cattle, and sheep. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 9.; patron, the Prebendary of Weighton in York Cathedral; net income, £176. The great tithes, and the small tithes of the new inclosures, for the manor of Market-Weighton with Shipton, were commuted for land in 1773, under an inclosure act. The church is an ancient edifice, with a square tower, and stands in the centre of the town. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans; and a national school built in 1842, at a cost of £600. Near the town are some tumuli, which have been found to contain human bones, and the remains of ancient armour supposed to be Danish. Professor Airey was born here.

Welbeck

WELBECK, an extra-parochial liberty, in the Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 3½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Worksop; containing 86 inhabitants, and consisting of 2284 acres. An abbey for Praemonstratensian canons, in honour of St. James, was founded here in 1153, by Thomas le Flemangh, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £298. 4. 8.

Welborne (All Saints)

WELBORNE (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of Norfolk, 6½ miles (E. S. E.) from East Dereham; containing 234 inhabitants, and comprising about 738 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, in the gift of Mrs. Johnson, valued in the king's books at £5. 18. 4.: the tithes have been commuted for £225; there is a parsonagehouse, and the glebe comprises 44¾ acres. The church is in the early and decorated English styles, with a circular tower.

Welbourn (St. Chad)

WELBOURN (St. Chad), a parish, in the union of Sleaford, Higher division of the wapentake of Boothby-Graffo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 9½ miles (N. W.) from Sleaford; containing 512 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 16. 0½., and in the patronage of the Countess of Buckinghamshire; net income, £493. The tithes were commuted for land in 1780. The church exhibits fine specimens of the early, decorated, and later English styles; the tower is of very ancient date.

Welburn

WELBURN, a township, in the parish and wapentake of Bulmer, union of Malton, N. riding of York, 1½ mile (N.) from Whitwell; containing 502 inhabitants. It comprises 825 acres, of which 426 are pasture, 317 arable, and 83 woodland. The road from York to Scarborough passes through. Here is a productive limestone-quarry, rented of the Earl of Carlisle, which supplies lime to the neighbourhood for several miles round. A handsome school, in which divine service is performed every Sunday evening, was built, and is partly supported, by the earl. There are places of worship for dissenters.

Welburn

WELBURN, a township, in the parish of Kirkdale, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 4¾ miles (E. by S.) from Helmsley; containing 131 inhabitants. It comprises about 1100 acres of land. The village is picturesquely situated in the valley of Kirkdale; and about a mile north of it, in the township, stands Kirkdale church, embosomed in woods. John Stockton, in 1839, left £5 per annum for the instruction of children.

Welbury (St. Leonard)

WELBURY (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Northallerton, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 6½ miles (N. N. E.) from Northallerton; containing 266 inhabitants. It comprises an area of 2350 acres, of which the greater portion is the property of the Earl of Harewood, who is lord of the manor. The surface is pleasingly undulated, and the higher grounds command fine views of the Cleveland hills. The substratum is a strong clay, of good quality for bricks and tiles, and there is a kiln for the manufacture of the latter. The Wisk, which is here a small stream, flows round a portion of the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 11., and in the patronage of the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster: the tithes have been commuted for £320, and the glebe comprises 63 acres. The church was rebuilt about the year 1815.

Welby

WELBY, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 2¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 58 inhabitants. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £90.

Welby (St. Bartholomew)

WELBY (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Aswardhurn, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Grantham; containing 475 inhabitants, and comprising 2491a. 3r. 38p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 3.; net income, £350; patron, the Prebendary of South Grantham in the Cathedral of Salisbury. The tithes were commuted for land in 1776; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe altogether contains 440 acres. The church is a handsome edifice, erected towards the close of the 15th century, with a spire supposed to be of much more ancient date. A school established and endowed in 1780 by William Welby, Esq., has also £15 per annum left by a late rector, the Rev. W. Dodwell, and a yearly donation of £ 11 from the lord of the manor. Four almshouses for aged women were founded at the same time.

Welches-Dam

WELCHES-DAM, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of North Witchford, hundred of South Witchford, Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge; containing 187 inhabitants, and comprising 2980 acres of land.

Weldon, Great (St. Mary)

WELDON, GREAT (St. Mary), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 9 miles (N. E. by N.) from Kettering; containing 812 inhabitants, of whom 473 are in the hamlet of Little Weldon. This parish comprises 3780a. 1r. 39p.; and contains some very old freestone-quarries. Fairs are held on the first Thursdays in February, May, and November. The market-house, erected at the expense of Viscount Hatton, and over which were some sessionschambers, supported by pillars of the Tuscan order, was pulled down some years since. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8; net income, £209; patron, the Earl of Winchilsea. There is a place of worship for Independents. In an inclosure called Chapel field, the pavements of a Roman villa, forming a double square, 100 feet by 50, with the foundations of a stone wall, and a great number of coins, were discovered in 1738: higher up the hill are the remains of an ancient town.

Welford (St. Gregory)

WELFORD (St. Gregory), a parish, in the union of Newbury, partly in the hundred of KintburyEagle, but chiefly in that of Faircross, county of Berks, 4 miles (N. W.) from Newbury; containing, with the tythings of Easton, Hoe Benham, and Weston, and the chapelry of Wickham, 1099 inhabitants, of whom 130 are in Welford tything. The parish comprises 4958a. 1r. 28p., of which 3504 acres are arable, 737 meadow and pasture, 661 woodland, and 54 waste and roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £35. 15. 5., and in the patronage of the Rev. W. Nicholson: the tithes have been commuted for £1353, and the glebe comprises 189½ acres. The church is principally in the decorated English style, with a tower whose lower part is circular and the upper square, surmounted by a spire. At the time of the Norman survey, there was a church in the hamlet of Weston.

Welford (St. Mary)

WELFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guilsborough, S. division of the county of Northampton, 15 miles (N. N. W.) from Northampton, on the road to Leicester; containing 1074 inhabitants. Prior to the introduction of railways, this was a celebrated posting-town, where the royal family and the nobility and gentry slept on their first day's journey from London to the north. The parish is divided from Husband's-Bosworth and North and South Kilworth by the river Avon. It comprises 2931½ acres, whereof two-thirds are pasture, 40 acres wood, and the remainder arable: the surface is elevated and undulating; and of the soil, two parts are clay, and one gravel. There are some good gravel-pits. The village is seated upon a hill. The Grand Junction canal passes through the parish, and has a wharf here. The living, separated from that of Sibbertoft in 1830, is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £244, with a good house; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Oxford. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with a tower, and contains three painted windows, and an old font. There is a place of worship for Independents. The premises of the free school here were purchased out of funds arising from the church and poor's land; it is supported by subscription, of which Mr. Payne contributes £10.

Welford (Holy Trinity)

WELFORD (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Stratford-upon-Avon, partly in the Stratford division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, but chiefly in the Upper division of the hundred of Deerhurst, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Stratford; containing, with the hamlet of Brickmersh, 738 inhabitants, of whom 608 are in the township of Welford. The parish is situated on the river Avon, and comprises 3026a. 29p., exclusive of roads. The titheable land consists of 1240 acres, of which 861 are arable, 364 pasture, and 15½ wood; and of the whole area, two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture. The soil is rich, and the scenery beautiful. Good stone is obtained. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £29. 15. 10., and in the patronage of the Countess Amherst: the tithes were commuted in 1840 for £300. 14. 10.; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 107 acres, valued at about £107. The church is principally in the early English style, with a lofty tower crowned by pinnacles. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also an infants' school.

Welham (St. Andrew)

WELHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Mahket-Harborough, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Harborough; containing 66 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £98. Richard Bryan, in 1803, bequeathed £8. 8. per annum to be distributed in bread to the poor; and the rent of a portion of land is applied to repairing the church.



<--Previous:
Webden - Weever
Next:-->
Well - Wells