Wheatacre - Whetstone

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

537-540

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'Wheatacre - Whetstone', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 537-540. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51396 Date accessed: 22 July 2014.


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Wheatacre (All Saints)

WHEATACRE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Clavering, E. division of Norfolk, 4¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Beccles; containing 176 inhabitants. It is bounded on the northeast by the river Waveney, and comprises by measurement 1147 acres, of which 420 are arable, 653 meadow and pasture, 56 woodland, and 18 waste. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Barnby and the vicarage of Mutford annexed, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 5½.; net income, £660; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. The tithes of Wheatacre have been commuted for £208, and the glebe comprises 57 acres. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with a square tower.

Wheatacre-Burgh.—See Burgh St. Peter.

WHEATACRE-BURGH.—See Burgh St. Peter.

Wheatenhurst, or Whitminster (St. Andrew)

WHEATENHURST, or Whitminster (St. Andrew), a parish, and the head of a union, in the Lower division of the hundred of Whitstone, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 7¼ miles (S. W.) from Gloucester; containing 391 inhabitants, and comprising 1238 acres. It is bounded on the north-west by the river Severn; the Gloucester and Berkeley and the Stroud canals pass through the parish, and the village is situated on the road from Gloucester to Bristol. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 3½., and has a net income of £135; the patronage belongs to the Ely family. The tithes have been commuted for £266. 10; the glebe comprises 11½ acres. Wheatenhurst poor-law union comprises 14 parishes or places, containing a population of 7970.

Wheatfield

WHEATFIELD, a parish, in the union of Thame, hundred of Pirton, county of Oxford, 2¼ miles (S.) from Tetsworth; containing 99 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres. The soil is generally a fine loam resting, in the higher lands, on chalk, and in the lower, on clay. The surface is partly flat and partly undulated, and watered by a small rivulet which separates the parish from Adwell and Tetsworth. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 10. 10., and in the gift of C. V. Spencer, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £230, and the glebe comprises 30 acres.

Wheathampstead (St. Helen)

WHEATHAMPSTEAD (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of St. Alban's, hundred of Dacorum, county of Hertford, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from St. Alban's; containing 1871 inhabitants. The rebellious barons here assembled their forces against Edward II., in 1311, on which occasion two nuncios, sent by the pope, endeavoured to restore peace between the contending parties, when the papal authority was rejected by the former. The parish comprises 4999a. 2r. 30p., of which 3543 acres are arable, 714 pasture and wood, 473 in homesteads and gardens, and 26S common and waste. The St. Alban's races are held on the ground called No-man's Land, which extends into this parish. The living is a rectory, with that of Harpenden annexed, valued in the king's books at £42. 1. 10½.; net income, £1356; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £770; the glebe comprises 40 acres, and a rent-charge of £576 is payable to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. The church is a cruciform structure, chiefly of early English character, with a central tower, and contains 500 sittings, of which 200 are free; the font is a curious specimen of the early decorated style. There is a place of worship for Independents. James Marshall, in 1719, bequeathed some property, the rental of which, amounting to £184. 15. per annum, is equally divided between the parishes of Wheathampstead and Harpenden, and expended in apprenticing children. John Bostock, abbot of St. Alban's, a learned divine and poet in the time of Henry VI., was born here, and was commonly called John of Wheathampstead.

Wheathill (Holy Trinity)

WHEATHILL (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Cleobury-Mortimer, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 9½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Ludlow; containing 140 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Bridgnorth to Ludlow, comprises 1424 acres. There is a small quarry of excellent freestone. The village was formerly of more importance, and had a weekly market and an annual fair, granted by charter of Edward I., both of which have been long discontinued. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 5. 7½., and in the gift of the Rev. John Churton: the tithes have been commuted for £201, and.the glebe comprises 93 acres. The church was originally in the Norman style, of which many interesting details are remaining, with additions of later date.

Wheathill (St. John the Baptist)

WHEATHILL (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Whitley, W. division of Somerset, 4 miles (W. by S.) from CastleCary; containing 28 inhabitants. It is on the road from Castle-Cary to Somerton, and comprises about 600 acres, principally in pasture. The springs in the vicinity are strongly impregnated with sulphur. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 5. 2£., and in the patronage of Mrs. Harbin: the tithes have been commuted for £73, and the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church is ancient.

Wheatley, Lancaster.—See Thornley.

WHEATLEY, Lancaster.—See Thornley.

Wheatley

WHEATLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Cuddesden, union of Headington, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford, 5½ miles (E. by S.) from Oxford; containing 997 inhabitants. A post-office is established in the village. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £120; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land in 1809. Bishop Moss, in 1811, bequeathed £3000 for the foundation of a national school, and for other charitable uses 3 in pursuance of which, schoolrooms have been provided, and £1500 given by the trustees as a permanent endowment, producing, with subscriptions, £100 per annum. Lady Curzon, in 1692, assigned lands now producing £15 per annum, for apprenticing children. Dr. Cyril Jackson, in 1816, gave £166. 13. three per cent, consols., for clothing the poor; and the rental of the town meadow, amounting to £26.10., is applied to general relief. The remains of a Roman villa were discovered in 1845.

Wheatley, York.—See Sandall, Long.

WHEATLEY, York.—See Sandall, Long.

Wheatley-Carr

WHEATLEY-CARR, a township, locally in the parochial chapelry of Newchurch, in the union of Burnley, parish of Whalley, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of Lancashire, 3¾ miles (W. S. W.) from Colne; containing 53 inhabitants. This township, anciently called Whitley-Carre, comprises 142 acres, and has a small village. Having, with ReedleyHallows, Filley-Close, and New Laund, all ancient vaccaries of Pendle, been allotted to no chapelry, it is considered as still belonging to the Castle parish, in consequence of which the inhabitants marry at Clitheroe.

Wheatley, North (St. Peter)

WHEATLEY, NORTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of East Retford, North-Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5¼ miles (N. E.) from East Retford; containing 424 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2144 acres: the soil is fertile, producing wheat much esteemed for its quality; and there are some quarries of gypsum. The village is pleasantly situated on the south side of the road to Gainsborough. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 18. 11½., and in the gift of Lord Middleton: the great tithes were commuted for £370, and the vicarial for £246. 13.; the glebe comprises 23 acres. The chancel of the church was rebuilt in 1824. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Wheatley, South (St. Helen)

WHEATLEY, SOUTH (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of East Retford, North Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (N. E.byE.) from East Retford; containing 41 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 694 acres, is separated from North Wheatley by a rivulet that flows along a deep and narrow valley. The living is a discharged rectory, in the patronage of the Chapter of Southwell, valued in the king's books at £6. 14. 2.; net income, £140. The church is a small structure.

Wheaton-Aston

WHEATON-ASTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Lapley, union of Penkridge, W. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 5£ miles (W. by S.) from Penkridge; containing 706 inhabitants. This is a large, irregularly built village. Fairs for cattle, &c, are held on April 20th and Nov. 1st. Besides the chapel of ease, are places of worship for Independents and Primitive Methodists.

Wheddicar

WHEDDICAR, a township, in the parish of St. Bees, union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 2½ miles (E. by S.) from Whitehaven; containing 59 inhabitants.

Wheelock

WHEELOCK, a township, in the parish of Sandbach, union of Congleton, hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 1½ mile (S. S. W.) from Sandbach; containing 574 inhabitants. It comprises 652 acres, the soil of which is a sandy loam. The Grand Trunk canal passes through, and on its banks are commodious wharfs and warehouses. There are two silk-factories, a cotton-factory, and two breweries; but the chief trade of the place is in salt, of which large quantities are extracted from brine found at a depth of 60 yards, on both sides of the river Wheelock. A district church, dedicated to Christ, has been erected, of which the incumbent has a net income of £150; patron, the Vicar of Sandbach. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £75, and the vicarial for £49. 14. 3. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans, and another for Independents.

Wheelton

WHEELTON, a township, in the parish and hundred of Leyland, union of Chorley, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) from Chorley, on the road to Blackburn 5 containing 1331 inhabitants. In the reign of Henry III., or early in that of Edward I., Henry de Quelton granted to Sir Adam de Hocton, for the annual rent of one barbed arrow, or four marks, at Michaelmas, all his lands in the town of "Quelton." Whelton-cum-Hepay was anciently considered as part of the manor of Hoghton; and in the 32nd of Elizabeth, Thomas Hoghton, Esq., who was slain at Lea Hall, by Thomas Langton, Baron of Newton, possessed the manor under the crown. The township comprises 1095 acres, chiefly pasture and meadow; about 100 acres are moorland: the surface is undulated and hilly, and the soil various, some being clay, and some light land. Abundance of stone is obtained for building; good flagstone is quarried, and coal is found, but not worked. Robert Parke, Esq., of Withnell Hall, is lord of the manor; and John Heys, Esq., of Gorse Hall, Alfred Silvester, Esq., of Atherton, William Talbot, Esq., and William Blackledge, Esq., are chief proprietors of the soil. Wall-Croft, with 100 customary acres, is the property of the Blackledge family. A cotton-mill in Wheelton is the property of Hugh Unsworth, Esq.; and here are some printworks, at present not in operation. The road from Chorley to Blackburn passes through the township, which is skirted by the Leeds and Liverpool canal. The corn tithes have been commuted for £50, and the vicarial for £66. The Wesleyans have a place of worship 5 and there is a national school.

Wheldrake (St. Helen)

WHELDRAKE (St. Helen), a parish, in the wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, union and E. riding of York, 3½ miles (E. N. E.) from Escrick, and 7½ (S. E.) from York; containing, with the township of Langwith, 722 inhabitants, of whom 6S2 are in Wheldrake township. The parish comprises 4431a. 1r. 19p., chiefly arable land: the surface is level and well wooded, the hedge-rows being generally planted with thriving oaktrees j the soil is a strong loam, except on the moor, where it is of a sandy quality. For a considerable distance, the Derwent forms the eastern boundary, but at the south-eastern extremity the parish stretches across the river, where it constitutes a valuable tract of meadow land called Wheldrake lugs, which admits of being mown every year without the application of manure. Lord Wenlock is lord of the manor, and owner of about fourfifths of the soil. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 17- 3£., and in the patronage of the Archbishop of York, with a net income of £430: the tithes were commuted in 1769 for land and a money payment, with the exception of those of Langwith. The church is a large edifice with an ancient stone tower; the nave and chancel, which are of brick, were built in 1779. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A national school is partly supported by an endowment of £17. 8. per annum.

Whelford

WHELFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of Kempsford, union of Cirencester, hundred of BrightwellsBarrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 178 inhabitants.

Whelpington, Kirk (St. Bartholomew)

WHELPINGTON, KIRK (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Bellingham, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland; containing, with the townships of Great Bavington, Capheaton, Catcherside, Coldwell, Crogdean, Fawns, Little and West Harle, and West Whelpington, 705 inhabitants, of whom 241 are in Kirk-Whelpington township, 21 miles (N. W.) from Newcastle. In the reign of King John, we find Richard de Umfraville making " his whole court at Whelpington" witness to a grant to the monks of Kelso; and the place for some time subsequently continued in this family, of whom Gilbert, in 1267, obtained from Henry III. liberty to hold a weekly market and annual fair here, which privileges, however, remained in force only for a very short period. The family of Whelpington also had possessions here, one of whom, Robert, was representative of Newcastle in parliament in 1412, 1422, and 1423, and mayor of that town in 1435 and 1438. The parish, exclusively of Capheaton, which is insulated, measures 5 miles from east to west, and 6 from north to south; it is a hilly district, for the most part composed of sheep and dairy farms, and on the west and north sides lies a broad belt of high and heathy moor. The soil is very various, in some places a rich black loam; limestone and sandstone are abundant, and the moors afford an almost inexhaustible supply of peat for fuel. The township consisted wholly of common until 1717, when the lands, comprising 1900 acres, were inclosed: the village is on the north side of the river Wansbeck, which has its source in the parish, and is crossed here by a stone bridge built in 1819. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 3. 4., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Durham, with a net income of £288; the glebe contains 210 acres. The church, which is ancient, with a low tower, has undergone many repairs, and constitutes the remains of a much larger edifice. There is a place of worship for Presbyterians in connexion with the Church of Scotland; and a national school is supported. A spring here, the water of which is impregnated with sulphur, has been found efficacious in chronic disorders. In various parts of the parish are traces of circular and rectilinear earthworks, probably thrown up in the border wars, for the protection of cattle from the moss-troopers. Whelpington Tower, now the vicarage-house, was anciently fortified.

Whelpington, West

WHELPINGTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Whelpington, union of Bellingham, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 15½ miles (W.) from Morpeth; containing 56 inhabitants. This place was successively the property of the Umfravilles, Lisles, Herons, and Milbanks, the last of whom sold it in 1796. It consists of the two lordships of Ray and West Whelpington. The village, at one time considerable, stood proudly on the northern margin of the river Wansbeck, on an elevated plain which slopes gently towards the east and is defended on all sides by a whinstone precipice: no person has resided here within memory; and Ray has also decreased very much in buildings and population. Horn's Castle, situated on a commanding eminence in the township, has been converted into a farmhouse. There are several earthworks within its limits; also the Waney Crag, a huge sandstone rock; and the district exhibits many interesting features in natural history.

Whenby (St. Martin)

WHENBY (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 2½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Bransby; containing 124 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1390 acres, of which about two-thirds are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the surface is undulated, and the soil generally a rich clay loam. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 8. 4., and in the gift of W. Garforth, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £120, and the vicarial for £105; the glebe consists of 10 acres. The church is an ancient structure, with a tower.

Whepstead

WHEPSTEAD, a parish, in the union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 4¼ miles (S. S. W.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 681 inhabitants, and comprising about 2789 acres. Plumpton, an ancient house here, is the seat of Lieut.-Gen. Sir Francis Thomas Hammond. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 4. 2.; net income, £468; patron and incumbent, the Rev. T. Image. Thomas Sparke, in 1721, left land now producing an income of about £21, for which ten children are educated; and the parish is entitled to a share of certain bequests by Sir Robert Drury and Sir Robert Jarvis, which, together with the interest of £200 given by J. W. Allen, Esq., is distributed among the poor.

Wherstead (St. Mary)

WHERSTEAD (St. Mary), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Samford, E. division of Suffolk, 2¾ miles (S. by W.) from Ipswich; containing 238 inhabitants. At a very early period here was a small religious foundation, united to the priory of St. Peter and St. Paul, Ipswich. The parish comprises 2019a. lr. 20p., of which 1466 acres are arable, 277 meadow and pasture, 244 woodland and plantations, 32 in gardens and homesteads, and 19 road; the surface is diversified with hill and dale, and the scenery, especially on the banks of the river Orwell, is beautifully picturesque. Wherstead Lodge, a handsome mansiou, is the seat of Sir Robert Harland, Bart. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriator, Sir Robert. The great tithes have been commuted for £401. 3., and the vicarial for £157. 7.; the glebe comprises 17 acres.

Wherwell (Holy Cross)

WHERWELL (Holy Cross), a parish, in the union of Andover, hundred of Wherwell, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3¾ miles (S. S. E.) from Andover; containing, with the tythings of Fullerton and Westover, 664 inhabitants. This place was distinguished as the site of a Benedictine nunnery founded and amply endowed by Queen Elfrida, about the year 986, in expiation of the murder of Edward the Martyr after the death of his father, Edgar, King of England, her second consort. Here she passed the remainder of her life; and the convent, which was dedicated to the Holy Cross and St. Peter, flourished till the Dissolution, when its revenue was returned at £403. 12. 10. The parish comprises 3261 acres, including 40 acres of common or waste; and is intersected by the rivers Test and Ande, which latter falls into the Redbridge and Andover canal. The surface is varied, and richly wooded. A fair for sheep is held on the 24th of September. The living is a vicarage, with the livings of Bullington and Tufton annexed, valued in the king's books at £14; net income, £301; patron, Colonel Iremonger, as owner of the sinecure rectory, which was a prebend in the nunnery of Wherwell, and is valued in the king's books at £44. 11. 0½. The great tithes of Wherwell have been commuted for £595, and the vicarial for £204; the glebe comprises 5 acres. In one of the recesses of an extensive wood is a stone cross, with the following inscription on its base: "About the year of our Lord dcccclxiii, upon this spot, beyond the time of memory called Dead Man's Plack, tradition reports that Edgar (sirnamed the Peaceable), King of England, in the ardour of youth, love, and indignation, slew with his own hand his treacherous and ungrateful favourite, Earl Athelwold, owner of the forest of Harewood, in resentment of the earl's having basely betrayed his royal confidence, and perfidiously married his intended bride the beauteous Elfrida, daughter of Ordgar, Earl of Devonshire, after wife to King Edgar and by him mother of King Etheldred the 2nd; which Queen Elfrida, after Edgar's death, murdered his eldest son King Edward the Martyr, and founded the nunnery of Whorwell."

Whessoe

WHESSOE, a township, in the parish of Haughtonle-Skerne, union of Darlington, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Darlington; containing 118 inhabitants. It comprises 1402 acres, of which 888 are arable, 477 grass-land, 7 wood, and 30 in roads and waste; the soil is a strong clay. The Stockton and Darlington, and the York and Newcastle, railways, pass through the township. The tithes were commuted in 1838 for £43. 11.6. Charles Colling, Esq., who contributed much to the improvement of short-horned cattle, resided at Ketton House here.

Wheston

WHESTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Tideswell, union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 1¼ mile (W.) from Tideswell; containing 65 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £30 payable to an impropriator, £4. 19. to the vicar, aud £15. 9. to the Bishop of Lichfield.

Whetham

WHETHAM, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Calne, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts; containing 200 inhabitants.

Whetmore, Salop.—See Buraston.

WHETMORE, Salop.—See Buraston.

Whetstone (St. Peter)

WHETSTONE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Blaby, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5¼ miles (S. S. W.) from Leicester; containing 956 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the north-west by the river Soar, comprises 2300 acres. Its soil is principally sand, alternated with clay of good quality for brick-making, for which there are some kilns; the surface is generally level. A small number of the population is employed in frame-work knitting. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Enderby: the tithes were commuted for land in 1764.

Whetstone

WHETSTONE, a hamlet and chapelry, in the parishes of Fryern-Barnet and Finchley, Finsbury division of the hundred of Ossulstone, union of Barnet, county of Middlesex, 8 miles (N. N. W.) from Loudon; containing 782 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of London, and of Trustees; net income, £120. The chapel, dedicated to St. John, has had a district assigned to it under the 59th of George III.