Whicham - Whistones

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

540-543

Citation Show another format:

'Whicham - Whistones', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 540-543. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51397&strquery=WHIMPLE Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Whicham (St. Mary)

WHICHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bootle, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 10 miles (S. S. E.) from Ravenglass; containing 299 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 6970 acres, of which 2463 are arable, 7 woodland, and about 4500 common and waste; the soil is various, the surface mountainous. The substratum contains ironore, and cobalt is found in the Black-Combe mountain. The Whitehaven and Furness Junction railway passes through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 15., and in the gift of the Earl of Lonsdale: the tithes have been commuted for £160, and the glebe comprises 75 acres, with a house. The church is a plain building. An annuity of £16, supposed to have been granted by Queen Elizabeth from the crown revenues in the county, and payable out of the exchequer, is applied towards the support of a grammar school at Churchgate. In the mountain is a cavity similar to the crater of a volcano, several hundred yards in diameter and depth; the inside is lined with vitrified and crystallized matter, having at the bottom a fine spring of water.

Whichford (St. Michael)

WHICHFORD (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Shipston-upon-Stour, Brailes division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 6 miles (S. E.) from Shipston; containing, with the hamlets of Ascott and Stourton, 691 inhabitants, of whom 344 are in the township. It is near the southern extremity of the county, on the border of Oxfordshire, and comprises 3007 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 8. 6½.; net income, £623; patron, Earl Beauchamp. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1805.

Whickham (St. Mary)

WHICKHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Gateshead, E. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham; containing, with the townships of Fellside, Lowside, and Swalwell, 4319 inhabitants, of whom 923 are in Whickham township, 3½ miles (W. S. W.) from Gateshead. The parish comprises about 6000 acres, of arable and pasture land in nearly equal portions, with a small quantity of wood: the Derwent divides it from Winlaton, on the west. A coal-mine is in operation 5 and at Dunston are some alkali-works, and a large factory for patent anchors. The village, which contains several neat and well-built houses, is pleasantly situated on an eminence overlooking the vales of Tyne and Team to the north and to the east, and commanding also an extensive prospect over the rising grounds across the Tyne. Gibside, the seat of William Hutt, Esq., is an ancient and splendid mansion, situated in spacious grounds embosomed in magnificent woodland scenery, and approached through a wood of venerable oaks: at the end of a fine terrace, nearly fronting the house, stands an elegant private chapel; and in the grounds is a Doric column 140 feet in height, surmounted by a colossal figure of Liberty. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 8. 11½., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Durham: the tithes have been commuted for £464, and the glebe consists of 107 acres. The church retains vestiges of considerable antiquity, amidst much of modern repair and alteration; is embellished with a square tower; and has a nave, aisles, and chancel: in the interior are eight plain square-edged Norman arches, and a bold chancel arch of the same style. The rectoryhouse stands at some distance across the road, to the west. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school, erected about 1711 by Robert Tomlinson, D.D., incumbent, and supported by various bequests subsequently made by him and others, together with subscriptions and the payments of the children. John Hewett, in 1738, left a small fund for apprenticing children; and about £30 per annum, the produce of benefactions, are distributed among the poor. In the parish is a bed of calcined earth, caused by the English, when pressed by the Scottish army under Leslie, setting fire to their camp, the flames of which communicated with a seam of coal that burnt with great fury for some years. The parish register, which commences in 1575, contains many allusions to the plague, and some also to the incursion of the Scottish army, part of which was quartered here after the rout at Newburn.

Whidhill

WHIDHILL, a tything, in the parish of St. Sampson, union of Cricklade and Wootton-Bassett, borough of Cricklade, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Cricklade and N. divisions of Wilts, 2¾ miles (S. E.) from Cricklade.

While, Herefordshire.—See Puddlestone.

WHILE, Herefordshire.—See Puddlestone.

Whillymoor

WHILLYMOOR, a township, in the parish of Arlecdon, union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 5½ miles (E. N. E.) from Whitehaven; containing 97 inhabitants, and comprising 1889a. 3r. 15p. The tithes were commuted for land in 1819. Divine service is performed in a schoolroom erected in 1840 by subscription, aided by a grant from the National Society.

Whilton (St. Andrew)

WHILTON (St. Andrew,) a parish, in the union of Daventry, hundred of Newbottle-Grove, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4½ miles (E. N. E.) from Daventry; containing 401 inhabitants. The parish comprises by survey 916 acres, in equal portions of arable and pasture. The Watling-street, the Grand Junction canal, and the London and Birmingham railway (of which the Weedon station is distant four miles), pass through it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 3.; net income, £328; patron, William Rose Rose, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1777; the glebe altogether comprises 183 acres. The present church, a plain neat structure, was built 30 years since. Jonathan Emery bequeathed £500, and Judith Worsfold £1000 three per cent, consols., producing together £55 per annum, which are applied in aid of a national school, £40 to the master, and the rest in keeping the buildings in repair.

Whimple (St. Mary)

WHIMPLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of Cliston, Woodbury and N. divisions of Devon, 4½ miles (W. N. W.) from Ottery St. Mary; containing, with the tything of Strete-Raleigh, 816 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the western road, at about an equal distance from Exeter and Honiton, comprises by measurement 3000 acres. A fair is held on the Monday before Michaelmas-day. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £30, and in the gift of Mrs. Sanders, with a net income of £357: the glebe comprises 60 acres. The church is an ancient structure.

Whinburgh (St. Mary)

WHINBURGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Mitford, W. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from East Dereham; containing 209 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road to Wymondham, and comprises 1241a. 3r. 2p., of which 929 acres are arable, 300 pasture and meadow, and about 14 woodland. A weekly market, and a fair on the festival of St. Simon and St. Jude, were granted by Edward I. to Lord Bardolph; both have been long discontinued. There are some slight remains of an old manor-house, surrounded by a double moat. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Westfield united, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 6½.; net income, £283; patron, the Rev. W. Grigson. The tithes of Whinburgh have been commuted for £169. 7.; the glebe comprises 21 acres, and a rent-charge of £5. 5. is payable to the rector of Yaxham. The church is in the early and later English styles, with a tower on the south side.

Whinfell

WHINFELL, a township, in the parish of Brigham, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 3¼ miles (S.) from Cockermouth; containing 132 inhabitants. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £14.

Whinfell

WHINFELL, a township, in the parish, union, and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 6½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Kendal; with 187 inhabitants.

Whippingham (St. Mildred)

WHIPPINGHAM (St. Mildred), a parish, in the liberty of East Medina, Isle of Wight division of the county of Southampton, 3½ miles (N. by E.) from Newport; containing 2518 inhabitants. This parish lies on the east side of the river Medina, and is bounded on the north-east by the Motherbank. It contains the populous hamlet of East Cowes, and also Barton's-Village near Newport, each of which places has an ecclesiastical district assigned to its church. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 1. 5½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £757. The parish church is a small structure, principally in the later English style, with a tower and spire.

Whipsnade (St. Mary Magdalene)

WHIPSNADE (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Luton, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford, 3 miles (S. W.) from Dunstable; containing 211 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1105 acres, of which 184 are common or waste land. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £156.

Whisby

WHISBY, a chapelry, in the parish of Doddington, Lower division of the wapentake of BoothbyGraffo, parts of Kesteven, union and county of Lincoln, 6 miles (S. W. by W.) from Lincoln; containing 63 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises about 1500 acres, of which 600 are moorland inclosed under an act passed in 1841. A rent-charge of £161. 15. has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes.

Whissendine (St. Andrew)

WHISSENDINE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Alstoe, county of Rutland, 4½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Oakham; containing 831 inhabitants. It comprises about 4230 acres: the surface is pleasingly diversified with hill and dale; the soil is fertile. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 1.; net income, £155; patron, the Earl of Harborough; impropriator, W. Bissill, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1762.

Whissonsett (St. Mary)

WHISSONSETT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Launditch, W. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (S.) from Fakenham; containing 702 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1322 acres, of which 1005 are arable, 300 meadow and pasture, and 14 woodland. The village is pleasantly situated; a fair, chiefly for shoes and pedlery, is held in it on the Wednesday in Whitsun-week. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Horningtoft united, valued in the king's books at £10. 3. 4.; net income, £714; patron, F. R. Reynolds, Esq. The tithes have been commuted for £329, and the glebe comprises 60 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower; in the chancel are several gravestones of grey marble, with brasses bearing the effigies of members of the Bozoun family. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Whistley-Hurst

WHISTLEY-HURST, a liberty, in the parish of Hurst, union of Wokingham, hundred of Charlton, county of Berks, 5¼ miles (E. by N.) from Reading; containing 992 inhabitants, and 1701a. 3r. 36p.

Whiston

WHISTON, a township, in the parish and union of Prescot, hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire, 1¼ mile (S.) from Prescot; containing 1586 inhabitants. In the reign of Richard II. the Lathoms had estates here, which descended through several generations; and the Torbocks, of whom the Lathoms were a branch, were, at a very remote period, possessed of Rudgate, in this manor. The Bolds held the manor in Henry VIII.'s reign, from which time its descent is not distinctly traced; but the families of Travers, Ogle, and Case were subsequently connected with the property; and more recently the manorial rights became vested in Richard Willis, Esq., of Halsnead. Coal is abundant in the township, and most of the inhabitants are employed in collieries. The road from Liverpool, by Cronton, to Warrington, passes on the south; and the Liverpool and Manchester railway runs through the township, by an inclined plane. Whiston Hall, a venerable building, said to have been the residence of the Lathoms, is now a farmhouse. A court leet is annually held. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £130; and the impropriate for £200, payable to King's College, Cambridge. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Whiston (St. Mary)

WHISTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hardingstone, hundred of Wymmersley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 6½ miles (E. by S.) from Northampton; containing 66 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 809 acres, of which the arable and pasture are in equal portions; about 40 acres are wood. The surface is undulated, and the lower grounds are watered by the river Nene; the soil is chiefly clay, alternated with gravel, and the substratum is excellent limestone. The village is on the line of railway from Blisworth to Peterborough, and although its situation is low, it is healthy. The living is a rectory, to which a portion of the rectory of Denton is annexed, valued in the king's books at £14. 11. 0½., and in the patronage of Lord Boston: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and there are 4 acres of glebe. The church, built about 1534 by Anthony Catesby, Esq., is remarkable for the beauty of its proportions, and is in the later English style, with an elegant tower 70 feet high, crowned by rich pinnacles. The font is octagonal, with panelled sides handsomely executed; in the chancel is a monument to the founder and various of his ancestors, and there are several memorials to the Irby family, of which one, to the first Lord Boston and his lady, is by Nollekens. Some remains exist of a moated building said, probably not correctly, to have been the residence of King John. In the parish is a petrifying spring.

Whiston

WHISTON, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Penkridge, Eastern division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, Southern division of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (W.) from Penkridge. There is a place of worship for Methodists.

Whiston

WHISTON, a township, in the parish of Kingsley, union of Cheadle, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 3¾ miles (N. E.) from Cheadle; containing 681 inhabitants.

Whiston (St. James)

WHISTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Rotherham, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 2½ miles (S. E.) from Rotherham; containing 1020 inhabitants. This parish comprises 2448 acres, nearly the whole in cultivation. The roads from Sheffield to Tickhill and from Rotherham to Mansfield, which latter was formerly part of one of the great highways to the north of England, intersect each other near the village. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £868; patron, the Earl of Effingham: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1816. The church, an unpretending building, contains a few memorials; a gallery has been erected in it. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Francis Mansel, in 1728, bequeathed a rent-charge of £6; and Joseph Hammond, in 1794, gave £300, since increased to £443; for teaching children. At Gilthwaite, a hamlet in the parish, a mineral spring was discovered in 1664, which was in repute for some time, but sank into neglect on the death of Mr. George Westby, who had made a large bath and built a house over it.

Whistones

WHISTONES, a tything, in the parish of Claines, Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, union, and Worcester and W. divisions of the county, of Worcester; adjacent to the north side of the city of Worcester, and containing 2849 inhabitants. A priory of White nuns, in honour of St. Mary Magdalene, was established here before 1255 by a bishop of Worcester, and had a revenue of £56. 3. 7. An hospital dedicated to St. Oswald, said to have been founded by Bishop Oswald, for a master and poor brethren, existed before 1268, and at the Dissolution was valued at £15. 18. per annum, and granted to the Dean and Chapter of Worcester. It was demolished in the reign of Elizabeth, but after the Restoration was rebuilt by Bishop Fell, who recovered most of its ancient possessions, and it now affords an asylum for twelve men.