Wickham - Wickwick

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

565-567

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'Wickham - Wickwick', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 565-567. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51404 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Wickham

WICKHAM, a chapelry, in the parish of Welford, union of Newbury, hundred of Kintbury-Eagle, county of Berks, 5½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Speenhamland; containing 202 inhabitants. The chapel, dedicated to St. Swithin, has a tower and chancel in the Norman style; an aisle was added in 1824, at the cost of the Rev. Henry Sawbridge, rector of Welford.

Wickham

WICKHAM, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Spalding, wapentake of Elloe, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 3¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Spalding; containing 57 inhabitants. The living is a donative curacy; net income, £33; patrons, the Governors of Spalding Free Grammar School. The chapel, dedicated to St. Nicholas, is in ruins.

Wickham (St. Nicholas)

WICKHAM (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Fareham, hundred of Titchfield, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Bishop's-Waltham; containing, with Wickham-Forest extra-parochial, 1164 inhabitants. The parish is on the road from London to Gosport, and comprises 2433 acres, of which 187 are common or waste land. Courts leet and baron are held annually; and a fair for cattle on May 20th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 2. 8½.; net income, £578; patron, W. Rashleigh, Esq. The village is remarkable as the birthplace, in 1324, of the munificent prelate, William of Wykeham; and as the residence of Dr. Joseph Warton, the poet, who died here in 1800.

Wickham, Bishop's

WICKHAM, BISHOP'S, a parish, in the union of Witham, hundred of Thurstable, N. division of Essex, 2½ miles (S. by E.) from Witham; containing 544 inhabitants. It derives the affix to its name from the appropriation of the manor to the bishops of London, who had formerly a palace here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 3. 4., and in the gift of the Bishop: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe comprises 80 acres. The church is a small edifice, with a belfry turret of wood.

Wickham, Childs (St. Mary)

WICKHAM, CHILDS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Evesham, Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 5¼ miles (W. by S.) from Chipping-Campden; containing, with the hamlet of Mircott, 469 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1860 acres of land; the soil is principally clay, and the surface flat. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 10.; net income, £105; patron and incumbent, the Rev. T. Marsden; impropriator, Sir T. Phillips, Bart. The tithes were commuted for land in 1763; the glebe comprises about 75 acres.

Wickham, East (St. Michael)

WICKHAM, EAST (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Dartford, hundred of Lessness, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, W. division of Kent, 3½ miles (W. N. W.) from Crayford; containing 555 inhabitants. It comprises 2310a. 8p., of which 890 acres are arable, 936 meadow, 111 pasture, and 294 wood. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Plumstead. Part of the lands and tithes were given by the famous admiral, Sir John Hawkins, in the reign of Elizabeth, to the hospital for distressed mariners founded by him at Chatham, to which they still belong. William Forster, in 1727, assigned some land in trust, among other purposes, to erect and endow a school; the income is £68.

Wickham-Market (All Saints)

WICKHAM-MARKET (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Plomesgate, hundred of Wilford, E. division of Suffolk, 12½ miles (N. E.) from Ipswich; containing 1400 inhabitants. The village occupies an elevated site rising from the river Deben. As its name implies, it was formerly a market-town; it had also a shire-hall, where sessions were held, but the building was taken down a few years since by the lord of the manor. The first stone of a new building for public purposes was laid on New-Year's day, 1846. The road from London to Yarmouth passes through the village. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 16. 8., and has a net income of £208; it is in the patronage of the Crown, and the impropriation belongs to Pemberton's charity at Ipswich. There is a glebe of 32 acres. The church, situated on an eminence commanding a most extensive prospect, is partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style, with an octagonal tower surmounted by a lofty spire, which forms a conspicuous landmark. Here is a place of worship for Independents. The old town lands consist of 17 acres, the bequests of several individuals, and the new lands of 23 acres, purchased with a bequest of £300 by Anne Roberts, in 1730, for teaching children; the whole produce £107 per annum, of which two-tenths are appropriated to a school, one-tenth to the apprenticing of children, two-tenths to the repairs of the church, and the residue to the poor. A workhouse for Plomesgate hundred has been erected here: the union comprises forty parishes or places, and contains a population of 21,051. Mr. John Kirby, compiler of The Suffolk Traveller, was for some time resident in the parish.

Wickham St. Paul (All Saints)

WICKHAM ST. PAUL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 4½ miles (N. by E.) from Halstead; containing 476 inhabitants. This parish is about six miles in circumference; the soil is light, in some parts very fertile. The village is pleasantly situated, and consists of neat well-built houses, ranged round an extensive green. The living is a rectory, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London, valued in the king's books at £9: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church is a substantial edifice, with a square embattled tower. The rent of a field, amounting to £11. 10., is given to the poor.

Wickham-Skeith (St. Andrew)

WICKHAM-SKEITH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hartismere, W. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N. N. W.) from Thwaite; containing 574 inhabitants. It comprises 1768a. 2p., of which about 35 acres are roads and waste, and the remainder arable and pasture land in good cultivation. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 8. 1½., and in the gift of the Rev. C. Garrard; impropriators, the landowners. The great tithes have been commuted for £422, and the vicarial for £129. 10.; the glebe comprises 10 acres. The church is a handsome structure, chiefly in the later English style, with a square tower, and a north and south porch.

Wickham, West (St. Mary)

WICKHAM, WEST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Linton, hundred of Chilford, county of Cambridge, 4¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Linton; containing 572 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £88; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Hardwicke. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1812.

Wickham, West (St. John the Baptist)

WICKHAM, WEST (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bromley, hundred of Ruxley, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, W. division of Kent, 2¾ miles (S. S. W.) from Bromley; containing 651 inhabitants. It comprises 2645a. 2r. 6p., of which 335 acres are in wood. The soil is generally chalk, alternated with gravel and clay; the surface is for the most part undulated, in some parts level, and the scenery is varied. The old manor-house is a quadrangular structure, with towers at the angles. The village was formerly a markettown: a fair for cattle is still held on Easter-Monday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 10. 10., and in the patronage of Sir Charles Francis Farnaby, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £495, and the glebe comprises 37 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure in the later English style; the chancel windows are beautifully ornamented with stained glass. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The learned Gilbert West, the friend of Gray the poet, long resided in the village, where he was visited by Lyttleton and Pitt; he was buried here in 1756.

Wickhambreux (St. Andrew)

WICKHAMBREUX (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Bridge, hundred of Downhamford, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Canterbury; containing 517 inhabitants. It consists of 2645 acres, of which 335 are in wood. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £29. 12. 6., and in the gift of J. P. Plumptre, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £749. 11., and the glebe comprises 20½ acres. The Rev. John Smith, B.D., in 1756, gave a house and schoolroom for the education of children.

Wickhambrook (All Saints)

WICKHAMBROOK (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 10 miles (S. E.) from Newmarket; containing 1623 inhabitants. It comprises 4348a. 2r. 28p., of which 130 acres are common or waste. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 10½., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriator, N. W. Bromley, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £52. 15., and the vicarial for £350; the glebe comprises 6 acres. The church is a large and handsome building with some good monuments. There is a place of worship for Independents. Mrs. Anne Warner, in 1785, left £400 three per cent, reduced annuities, the dividends of which, together with the rental of the poor's estate and some other bequests, altogether amounting to £30 per annum, are distributed among the poor. Elizabeth Chinery, by will in 1818, gave £250 three per cents., directing the dividends to be applied in purchasing linen. Some Roman remains have been found.

Wickhamford (St. John the Baptist)

WICKHAMFORD (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Evesham, Upper division of the hundred of Blackenhurst, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2¼ miles (E. S. E) from Evesham; containing 123 inhabitants. This place is recorded in Domesday book as belonging to the abbey of Evesham, the monks of which subsequently erected a grange here. The parish is in the south-eastern part of the county, on the border of Gloucestershire; and consists of 1203a. 2r. The living is a discharged perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £2. 4. 4½., and in the patronage of the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford, the appropriators. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £234, and £40 are payable to the incumbent. The church is an exceedingly neat edifice, with a simple unpretending tower which rises prettily above the trees that environ it: in the chancel are two enriched altar-tombs with effigies in alabaster, in memory of the Sandys family, whose descendant, Lord Sandys, in 1841 repaired the entire church. Limestone is obtained in abundance in the neighbourhood.

Wickhampton (St. Andrew)

WICKHAMPTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Blofield, hundred of Walsham, E. division of Norfolk, 4½ miles (S. S. E.) from Acle; containing 139 inhabitants. The railway from Norwich to Yarmouth passes through. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4, and in the patronage of J. F. Leathes, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £193. 4. 2. The church is an ancient structure in the early and decorated English styles, with a square embattled tower; in the chancel, under richlydecorated arches, are the effigies of Sir William de Gerbridge and his lady. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Wicklewood

WICKLEWOOD, a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (W. N. W.) from Wymondham; containing 775 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1500 acres, of which about 20 acres form a lake. A market and two fairs, granted by Henry VI., were formerly held here. The living consists of the discharged vicarages of All Saints and St. Andrew, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 11½.; the patronage and impropriation belong to Mrs. Cholmondeley, Mrs. Elizabeth Darby, and Mrs. Mary Kett: the great tithes have been commuted for £332, and the small for £127; the vicar has a glebe of 30 acres. All Saints' church is in the later English style, with a square embattled tower: that of St. Andrew stood in the same churchyard. There is a place of worship for Independents. At the inclosure, 14 acres of land were allotted to the poor for fuel. The workhouse for the hundred is in the parish.

Wickmere

WICKMERE, a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of South Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Aylsham; containing 307 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres, of which 763 are arable, 191 meadow and pasture, and the remainder roads and waste. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Wolterton, and valued in the king's books at £9; the glebe comprises 37 acres. The church is in the decorated English style, with a circular tower.

Wickton

WICKTON, a township, in the parish of StokePrior, union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Leominster; containing 72 inhabitants.

Wickwar (Holy Trinity)

WICKWAR (Holy Trinity), a market-town and parish, in the union of Chipping-Sodbury, Upper division of the hundred of Grumbald's-Ash, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 24 miles (S. S. W.) from Gloucester, and 111 (W.) from London; containing 1125 inhabitants. This town, which consists principally of one spacious and well-built street, is pleasantly situated on the nearest and best road from Bath to Gloucester and the north of England, and is watered by two small streams. The surrounding scenery is highly picturesque, and the air proverbially pure and salubrious. Great improvements have taken place: a new road has been formed to Wotton-under-Edge, by which the distance has been shortened two miles; and the railway from Bristol to Birmingham has a station here. The works of this railway, in the vicinity, comprise a tunnel threequarters of a mile in length. The clothing-trade was formerly carried on to a considerable extent. The market is on Monday; and fairs take place on April 6th and July 2nd, for horses and horned-cattle. Under a charter granted by Charles I., the town is governed by a mayor and an indefinite number of aldermen, consisting of all who have served the office of mayor: a manorial court leet is held triennially, in October. The parish comprises by measurement 2307 acres, of which about one-third is arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the soil is a stone brash, alternated with clay. An act for inclosing certain waste lands was passed in 1838. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18, and in the gift of Lord Ducie: the tithes have been commuted for £430, and the glebe comprises 14½ acres. The church is in the later English style, with a lofty square embattled tower, and contains 436 sittings. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; also a free school founded in 1683, by Alexander Hosea, a native of the town, who endowed it with property now producing £126 per annum.

Wickwick

WICKWICK, a hamlet, in the parish of FramptonCotterell, poor-law union of Chipping-Sodbury, Upper division of the hundred of Langley and Swinehead, W. division of the county of Gloucester 3 containing 33 inhabitants.