Wike - Wilksby

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

575-577

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'Wike - Wilksby', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 575-577. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51407 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Wike, near Bradford, York.—See Wyke.

WIKE, near Bradford, York.—See Wyke.

Wike

WIKE, a township, partly in the parish of Bardsey, but chiefly in that of Harewood, Upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 6¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Leeds; containing 146 inhabitants. This township comprises about 1050 acres, in full cultivation; the surface is pleasing, and the village, though small, is neatly built, and of rural aspect. The tithes have been commuted for £14. 3. payable to certain impropriators, £16. 2. to the vicar of Thorner, £41. 7. to the vicar of Harewood, and £39 to the vicar of Bardsey. A school for ten children is supported by an annuity paid by the trustees of Lady Hastings' charity. In 1835, an earthen jar was dug up, containing silver pence of the reigns of Edward I. and II.

Wilbarston (All Saints)

WILBARSTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 4½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Rockingham; containing, with part of the hamlet of Pipewell, 684 inhabitants, of whom 626 are in the township of Wilbarston. The parish comprises 2785 acres, and is intersected by the road from Harborough to Stamford. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 1.; net income, £187; patrons and impropriators, the family of Watson. There is a place of worship for Independents. Mrs. Catherine Palmer bequeathed £200, for educating girls of the parish, and employing the aged poor in spinning flax, &c.; and some other trifling bequests are distributed in bread and money.

Wilberfoss (St. John the Baptist)

WILBERFOSS (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Pockltngton, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing, with the township of Newton-upon-Derwent, 586 inhabitants, of whom 357 are in the township of Wilberfoss, 8 miles (E.) from York. This place, from the time of the Conquest, was the property of the Wilberforce family, from which was descended the late William Wilberf'orce, the distinguished philanthropist; but the ancient family mansion and the estates were sold in 1710, and the lands are now divided among several proprietors, of whom Col. Wyndham is lord of the manor. The parish is bounded on the east by the Wolds, and on the west partly by the Derwent. It comprises 2990 acres, of which 1350 are in the township of Wilberfoss; the surface is generally level, and the soil various, but principally a light sandy loam. Good stone for the roads is obtained. The village, which is neatly built, and of rural appearance, is situated on the road from York to Hull, and intersected by a stream called the Foss, which flows into the river Derwent. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £67; patrons and impropriators, Colonel Wyndham, and three others. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with a square embattled tower; it was repewed in 1810. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists. The poor have nearly ten acres of land, partly allotted at the inclosure, and partly purchased with a bequest of £40 by Mr. John Horsley. A Benedictine nunnery, dedicated to St. Mary, was founded here by Alan de Catton, prior to the year 1153, and at the Dissolution had a revenue of £28. 8. 8. per annum.

Wilbraham, Great (St. Nicholas)

WILBRAHAM, GREAT (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Staine, county of Cambridge, 7¼ miles (E. by S.) from Cambridge; containing 564 inhabitants. It comprises 2800 acres. The soil is of light quality, resting upon chalk and gravel; the surface in the western portion is flat, and in the southern parts elevated. The manor-house, an ancient building that belonged to the Knights Templars, is still called the Temple. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 18. 4.; net income, £203; patron and impropriator, Edward Hicks, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1797; the glebe comprises 155 acres. The church is a cruciform structure, with a tower at the west end; it had originally a tower rising from the centre.

Wilbraham, Little (St. John the Evangelist)

WILBRAHAM, LITTLE (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Staine, county of Cambridge, 7¼ miles (E.) from Cambridge; containing 345 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 16. 8.; net income, £326; patrons, the President and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. The tithes were commuted for land in 1797.

Wilburton (St. Peter)

WILBURTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of South Witchford, union and Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge, 6½ miles (S. W.) from Ely; containing 500 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2233 acres, of which 1182 are arable, 534 meadow and pasture, and the remainder woodland, common, roads, and waste: the soil is mostly rich. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £68; patron, the Archdeacon of Ely. The tithes have been commuted for £519, and the glebe consists of 170 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, and contains 100 sittings. There is a place of worship for Baptists. The parsonage-house was anciently the seat of the archdeacons of Ely; and Henry VII., and his son Prince Henry, were entertained in it for several days, when that sovereign came to visit the shrine of St. Ethelreda.

Wilby (All Saints)

WILBY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Guiltcross, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (N. E. by E.) from East Harling; containing 124 inhabitants. It comprises about 1400 acres, of which 930 are arable, 450 meadow and pasture, and 15 woodland. The ancient Hall, surrounded by a moat, is now a farmhouse. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Hargham annexed, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 7½., and in the patronage of Sir Thomas B. Beevor, Bart.: the tithes of Wilby have been commuted for £210, and the glebe comprises 32 acres, with a house. The church is chiefly in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower.

Wilby (St. Mary)

WILBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Hamfordshoe, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2 miles (S. W. by W.) from Wellingborough; containing 428 inhabitants. This parish is on the road to Northampton, and comprises 1134a. 22p. The soil is of various quality: there are some quarries of limestone, used for the roads, and for burning into lime. The village is pleasantly situated about a mile from the river Nene; the inhabitants are partly employed in the manufacture of parchment, and in the preparation of wash leather. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 19. 4½.; net income, £386; patron, the Rev. William Stockdale. The tithes were commuted for 176 acres of land in 1801, and there are about 68 acres of glebe, with a house. The church is in the early and decorated English styles, with a handsome tower surmounted by an octangular turret, above which rises a lofty and graceful spire, the whole forming an elegant specimen of the later English style. Belemnites, ammonites, and other fossils are found in the parish. Dr. Percy, Bishop of Dromore, was rector of Wilby.

Wilby (St. Mary)

WILBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoxne, E. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Stradbrooke; containing 623 inhabitants, and comprising 1844a. lr. 20p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 6. 10½., and in the gift of the Rev. George Mingaye: the tithes have been commuted for £630, and the glebe comprises 51 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower, and a south porch of elegant design; it contains a monument to the Green family, and a richly-sculptured font.

Wilcot (Holy Cross)

WILCOT (Holy Cross), a parish, in the union of Pewsey, hundred of Swanborough, Everley and Pewsey, and N. divisions of Wilts, 1¾ mile (W. N. W.) from Pewsey; containing 677 inhabitants. This parish comprises 2558a. 3r. 6p., of which 1846 acres are arable, 335 meadow and pasture, 126 woodland, 222 open down, and 29 in homesteads, roads, and waste; the soil is generally a rich loam, and the surface finely varied with hills and valleys. The Kennet and Avon canal passes through. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 17., and in the gift of Lieut.Col. G. W. Wroughton: the vicar's tithes have been commuted for £131. 10., those of the impropriator for £25, and certain tithes belonging to the rector of Huish for £15. 16. The manor-house is said to have been a monastery.

Wilcote (St. Peter)

WILCOTE (St. Peter), a parish, in the poor-law union of Witney, hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Witney; containing 9 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Mrs. Pickering.

Wildboar-Clough

WILDBOAR-CLOUGH, a township, in the parish of Prestbury, union and hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 6½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Macclesfield; containing 347 inhabitants. It comprises 3078 acres, partly a light soil, partly stony, and partly peat. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Wilden (St. Nicholas)

WILDEN (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the hundred of Barford, union and county of Bedford, 5¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Bedford; containing 443 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2170 acres, of which 1800 are arable, 350 meadow and pasture, and 20 woodland: the soil is chiefly clay, well adapted to the growth of wheat; the surface is partly flat, but in general hilly, and the scenery is pleasingly diversified. The making of pillow-lace affords employment to the females. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 7. 1.; net income, £250; patron, the Duke of Bedford. The tithes were commuted for land in 1811; the glebe altogether comprises 470 acres. The church has been repewed. John and Thomas Rolle, in 1624, gave land now producing an income of £40 per annum for teaching children.

Wilden

WILDEN, a village, in the parish of Hartlebury, union of Droitwich, Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Kidderminster and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Stourport. The village is seated on the river Stour, which empties itself into the Severn about two miles below it. The soil in the vicinity is light and sandy, the land in pasture, and the scenery beautifully picturesque: there are quarries of red-sandstone, which supplied the material for building the present parish church. The Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal runs within a quarter of a mile of the village, and parallel with it the river Stour, to Stourport. The Wilden Iron and Tin-plate Works, belonging to Messrs. Lewty, were established in their present united branches in 1840; the concern was originally commenced between the years 1600 and 1630, as charcoal iron-works only, and was among the earliest iron-works founded in England. The number of hands at present employed is between two and three hundred; the machinery is set in motion by two steam-engines, each of 30-horse power, and by water-power equal to about 60 horses. The parish church is within a mile of the village. The proprietors of the works have built a school-house for the children of their workmen.

Wildhern

WILDHERN, a hamlet, in the parish, union, and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; with 124 inhabitants.

Wildon-Grange

WILDON-GRANGE, a township, in the parish of Coxwold, union of Easingwould, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 6½ miles (N. by W.) from Easingwould; containing 21 inhabitants. It comprises 667a. lr. 11p., of which 350 acres are arable, 307 meadow and pasture, and 10 woodland. The Archbishop of York is lord of the manor. The village is situated in the dale of a small rivulet, about a mile west-northwest of Coxwold. The tithes have been commuted for £179, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge.

Wildsworth

WILDSWORTH, a hamlet, in the parish of Laughton, union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Corringham, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7½ miles (N.) from Gainsborough; containing 147 inhabitants. A chapel of ease was erected in 1839, chiefly at the expense of Lady William Gordon; it contains 100 sittings.

Wilerick, or Willcrick

WILERICK, or Willcrick, a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 6 miles (E.) from Newport; containing 35 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road between Caerleon and Chepstow, and comprises 406a. 2r. 1p., of which 153 acres are arable, 218 pasture and meadow, 20 woodland, and 12 common; the soil is chiefly clay. In the centre is a small elevated wood, from which is a beautiful view of the Bristol Channel, and the hills in the counties of Somerset and Gloucester. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Llanmartin, and valued in the king's books at £2. 10. 2½.: the tithes have been commuted for £38, and the glebe comprises 13 acres. The church is in the Norman style.

Wilford, or Wilfrids Ford (St. Wilfrid)

WILFORD, or Wilfrids Ford (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Basford, N. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 1½ mile (S. W.) from Nottingham; containing 569 inhabitants. This parish comprises by measurement about 1700 acres. The village, which is situated on the south bank of the river Trent, has several handsome villas belonging to opulent families engaged in the trade of Nottingham. The Trent, the Nottingham canal, and the railway to Derby, afford facility of communication. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 17. 6.; net income, £574; patron, Sir Juckes G. C. J. Clifton, Bart.; present incumbent, the Rev. Thomas Thorp: the glebe consists of 230 acres, with a large house in good repair. The church is a neat edifice, with a low square tower at the north-west angle; the windows and door of the chancel are elaborate: it stands close to the river, and commands a pleasing view of Nottingham and its vicinity. There is a place of worship for dissenters attached to Wilford House, the property and residence of Henry Smith, Esq., who in 1828 built an infant school, which he supports at his own expense. A free school was founded in 1727 by the Rev. Benjamin Carter, vicar, the endowment whereof now exceeds £200 per annum; the school-house was erected in 1736. Some Roman coins, chiefly of the later emperors, were dug up some years since.

Wilkenthrup

WILKENTHRUP, a hamlet, in the parish of Horsington, union of Wincanton, hundred of Horethorne, Eastern division of Somerset; containing 42 inhabitants.

Wilkesley, with Dodcot.— See Dodcot.

WILKESLEY, with Dodcot.— See Dodcot.

Wilksby (All Saints)

WILKSBY (All Saints), a parish, in the union and soke of Horncastle, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Horncastle; containing 89 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated about a mile south of the road from Boston to Horncastle, comprises by measurement 640 acres. The soil is various, principally inclining to clay and gravel, and the surface generally level, in some parts abounding in springs. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 4. 2., and in the gift of Sir Henry Dymoke; net income, £130, arising from a glebe of 100 acres. The church is a small brick building, erected about fifty years since.



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