Winterbourne - Winterbourne-Zelstone

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

620-622

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'Winterbourne - Winterbourne-Zelstone', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 620-622. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51415 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Winterbourne

WINTERBOURNE, a chapelry, in the parish of Chieveley, union of Newbury, hundred of Faircross, county of Berks, 3½ miles (N. N. W.) from Newbury; containing 337 inhabitants, and comprising 2084a. 26p. The chapel is dedicated to St. James. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £530, the vicarial for £200, and there is a glebe of 16½ acres. A school is endowed with £10 per annum.

Winterbourne (St. Martin)

WINTERBOURNE (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of George, Dorchester division of Dorset, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Dorchester; containing 422 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3474 acres, of which 100 are common or waste. A market, granted by Henry III., was formerly held here; and a fair is still kept on St. Martin's day. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 15.; net income, £73; patron, the Bishop of Salisbury; impropriator, H. Sturt, Esq. The church has a neat embattled tower crowned with pinnacles. In this parish is Maiden Castle, one of the strongest and most extensive Roman camps in the west of England, which, according to Ptolemy, was the castra æstiva of thegarrison of Dunium, afterwards called Dumovaria, the capital of the Durotriges. It has a treble ditch and rampart, inclosing an irregular oval area of 44 acres; the entire work covers 115½ acres. There are two very intricate entrances, that at the east end being defended by five, and that at the west end by six, ditches and ramparts. Near the former passes the vicinal road leading from Dorchester to Weymouth, and to the latter extends a branch from the Via Iceniana, which passes about a mile north of the camp. The summit commands a prospect of barrows stretching for many miles along the tops of the hills southward.

Winterbourne (St. Mary)

WINTERBOURNE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Clifton, Upper division of the hundred of Langley and Swine head, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (N. E. by N.) from Bristol; containing 3151 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the road from Bristol to Oxford, and watered by the small river Frome. It comprises by admeasurement 3202 acres. There are numerous quarries of stone for building and the repair of roads; and between 300 and 400 persons are employed in a hat manufactory. Fairs, chiefly for farmers' live-stock, are held in the spring and in October. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £27. 7. 6.; net income, £1187; patrons, the President and Fellows of St. John's College, Oxford. The church is supposed to have been built in the reign of Henry II. A church was erected at the large hamlet of Frenchay in 1836, which has since been amply endowed; and a portion of the parish having been assigned to it ecclesiastically, it is now an independent rectory. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, Independents, the Society of Friends, and Unitarians.

Winterbourne-Abbas (St. Mary)

WINTERBOURNE-ABBAS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of Eggerton, Dorchester division of Dorset, 4¾ miles (W.) from Dorchester; containing 206 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, with that of Winterbourne-Steepleton united, valued in the king's books at £13. 17. 6., and in the gift of Lincoln College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £240; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains 88¾ acres. The stream called the South Winterbourne, which runs through the parish, rises about a mile to the west, in the vicinity of an ancient British temple, consisting of nine rude stones of unequal height, placed in a circle, the diameter of which is 28 feet. Half a mile westward are the remains of a cromlech, and there are several other erect stones in the neighbourhood. The parish is supposed to have been the scene of some remarkable action, from the great number of tumuli scattered in different directions.

Winterbourne-Anderston, in the county of Dorset.—See Anderston.

WINTERBOURNE-ANDERSTON, in the county of Dorset.—See Anderston.

Winterbourne-Basset (St. Catherine)

WINTERBOURNE-BASSET (St. Catherine), a parish, in the union of Marlborough, hundred of Selkley, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of Wilts, 7 miles (N. W.) from Marlborough; containing 275 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2000 acres, and is situated on the road from Bath through Devizes to Swindon; the soil near the village is a good loam, and on the rise of the hills appears chalk, with its usual mixture of flints. Some property here formerly possessed by the Baskervilles has descended to Lord Holland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 9. 7., and in the gift of Magdalene College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £674. 15.; there is a parsonage-house, and the glebe consists of 80 acres. The church is a small ancient edifice with a neat tower, containing portions in the early and later English styles; it has a handsomely carved font, and in one of the aisles is a singularly elegant window: the chief monuments are of the family of Baskerville, who long resided here. Among the various Druidical remains are, a double circle of rude stones, a barrow surrounded with large stones, and the supposed site of buildings once occupied by Archdruids.

Winterbourne-Came (St. Peter)

WINTERBOURNE-CAME (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, partly in the hundred of Culliford-Tree, and partly within the liberty of Frampton, Dorchester division of Dorset, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Dorchester; containing, with the hamlet of Cripton, 157 inhabitants, of whom 140 are in Winterbourne-Came hamlet. This parish is situated on the road from Dorchester to Wareham, and comprises 1500 acres, of which 500 are arable, 600 pasture, and 400 woodland; the soil rests upon chalk and gravel. The living is a rectory, to which that of WinterbourneFarringdon was united in 1751, valued jointly in the king's books at £15. 5.; net income, £251; patron, the Earl of Portarlington. The church was erected about the year 1640. Here was a small Benedictine nunnery, supposed to have been a cell to the abbey of Caen, in Normandy.

Winterbourne-Clenstone (St. Nicholas)

WINTERBOURNE-CLENSTONE (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Coombs-Ditch, Blandford division of Dorset, 4¼ miles (S. W.) from the town of Blandford; containing 96 inhabitants. This parish was anciently more populous and of much greater importance than it is at present, having three churches, the livings of which were rectories. A little south of the present church, on the side of a hill, commences Coombs-Ditch, which gives name to the hundred, and where courts were formerly held; it is thought by Dr. Stukeley to have been a rampart and ditch of the first colony of the Belgæ. The parish is situated about two miles from the road between Salisbury and Dorchester, and comprises 1357a. 2r. 29p., of which about 274 acres are arable, 447 meadow and pasture, and 335 woodland. The soil rests upon chalk and flint, and is in some parts clay, in others a thin loam. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 1½., and in the gift of the Pleydell and Darner families, alternately: the tithes have been commuted for £199. 10.; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 2½ acres. The church, built in 1839 at the expense of the lord of the manor, is a cruciform structure in the early English style, larger than the ancient edifice on the same site by the addition of a chancel and north transept; a gallery has been erected, and the building is ornamented with an east window of stained glass.

Winterbourne Dantsey or Dannery (St. Edward)

WINTERBOURNE DANTSEY or DANNERY (St. Edward), a parish, in the union of Amesbury, hundred of Alderbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Salisbury; containing 166 inhabitants, and comprising about 1550 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Salisbury; net income, £80. The impropriation of the parish belongs to Miss M. A. Skinner.

Winterbourne, Earls (St. Michael)

WINTERBOURNE, EARLS (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Amesbury, hundred of Alderbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 3¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Salisbury; containing 221 inhabitants, and comprising about 1612 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Salisbury; net income, £34. The tithes have been commuted for £470, and the glebe contains 137 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Near the village is an ancient earthwork called Chlorus Camp, or Figbury Ring, of circular form, including an area of about 15 acres.

Winterbourne-Farringdon, or St. German's

WINTERBOURNE-FARRINGDON, or St. German's, formerly a parish, now claiming to be extraparochial, in the union of Weymouth, hundred of Culliford-Tree, Dorchester division of Dorset, 2½ miles (S.) from Dorchester. The living, a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 3. 6½., was in 1751 united to the rectory of Winterbourne-Came.

Winterbourne-Gunner, or Cherborough (St. Mary)

WINTERBOURNE-GUNNER, or Cherborough (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Amesbury, hundred of Alderbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Salisbury; containing 144 inhabitants. It comprises 1506 acres, of which 286 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 10½., and in the gift of the Rev. C. J. Coleman: the tithes have been commuted for £214; there is a parsonage house, and the glebe contains 7½ acres.

Winterbourne-Herringstone, in the county of Dorset.—See Herringstone.

WINTERBOURNE-HERRINGSTONE, in the county of Dorset.—See Herringstone.

Winterbourne-Houghton (St. Andrew)

WINTERBOURNE-HOUGHTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of Dorset, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from the town of Blandford; containing 304 inhabitants. In the reign of Edward II., this place belonged to Hugh le Despenser, on whose execution at Bristol it escheated to the crown. The parish comprises about 2000 acres, of which about 750 are down and pasture, 500 woodland, and the rest arable: the surface is very hilly, and the soil chalk, thickly set with flints; good barley is produced, and large flocks of sheep are pastured. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Mrs. Michel: the tithes have been commuted for £180; there is a parsonagehouse, and the glebe contains about 100 acres. The church is an ancient structure, with some remains of the original rood-loft still in good preservation. Considerable quantities of spar are found in the coppices.

Winterbourne-Kingston (St. Nicholas)

WINTERBOURNE-KINGSTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of BeerRegis, Wareham division of Dorset, 6½ miles (S. S. W.) from Blandford; containing 567 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Beer-Regis; impropriators. E. M. Pleydell, Esq., and others. The great tithes have been commuted for £410, and those of the vicar for £120. 17. 6.

Winterbourne-Monkton

WINTERBOURNE-MONKTON, a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of Culliford-Tree, Dorchester division of Dorset, 2 miles (S. W. by S.) from Dorchester; containing 91 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £157; patron, the Earl of Ilchester. An alien priory subordinate to the priory of West, or de Vasto, of the order of Cluny, is said to have existed here.

Winterbourne-Monkton (St. Mary Magdalene)

WINTERBOURNE-MONKTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Marlborough, hundred of Selkley, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of Wilts, 7 miles (W. N. W.) from Marlborough; containing 251 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 2000 acres; the surface is flat, and the soil in general light. The living is a discharged vicarage, united in 1747 to that of Avebury, and valued in the king's books at £5: the tithes were commuted for land in 1813; the glebe contains 90 acres.

Winterbourne-Steepleton (St. Michael)

WINTERBOURNE-STEEPLETON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of Uggscombe, Dorchester division of Dorset, 4 miles (W. by S.) from the town of Dorchester; containing 189 inhabitants. It comprises 1783 acres, of which 565 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, united to that of Winterbourne-Abbas, and valued in the king's books at £10. 4. 7. The church, situated in the middle of the parish, is ornamented with a stone spire, which, and that at Iwerne-Minster, are perhaps the only spires in the county.

Winterbourne-Stoke (St. Peter)

WINTERBOURNE-STOKE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Amesbury, hundred of Branch and Dole, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 9 miles (N. W. by N.) from Salisbury; containing 328 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Amesbury to Hindon and Shaftesbury, and comprises 3500 acres, of down land, forming a part of Salisbury Plain, and entirely appropriated to pasturing sheep. The soil is incumbent on chalk and flint. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 2. 8.; patron and impropriator, Lord Ashburton. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £131. 9., and the vicarial for £220; a rent-charge of £95 is paid to the Dean and Chapter of Sarum, and the glebe contains between 2 and 3 acres. The church is a fine ancient structure with a handsome tower; it has been repaired and repewed, and the chancel rebuilt, at a cost of £350, by subscription. On the downs are some barrows, and traces of an ancient encampment.

Winterbourne-Strickland

WINTERBOURNE-STRICKLAND, a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of Dorset, 3¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Blandford; containing 383 inhabitants, and comprising 2215a. 3r. 18p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 6. 3.; net income, £367; patron, the Earl of Portarlington. There is a parsonage-house, and the glebe contains about 60 acres. The church, situated nearly in the centre of the parish, has an embattled tower crowned with pinnacles; it was repaired about 1716. Quarrelston House, an ancient quadrangular building, formerly the seat of the Binghams, has been, for the greater part, pulled down at different times within the last half century.

Winterbourne-Whitchurch (St. Mary)

WINTERBOURNE-WHITCHURCH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Coombs-Ditch, Blandford division of Dorset, 5 miles (S. W.) from the town of Blandford; containing 541 inhabitants. It comprises 2866a. 3r. 37p., of which about 1390 acres are arable, 1198 pasture, and 258 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 10½.; patron, Bishop of Salisbury; impropriators, E. M. Pleydell, and H. C. Compton, Esqrs. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £95. The church is a long narrow edifice, with a south transept, and a low embattled tower rising from the intersection, and contains a curious ancient font. The Rev. Samuel Wesley, father of John and Charles Wesley who founded the sect of Methodists, and author of several poems on religious subjects, was born here during the incumbency of his father, who was ultimately ejected for nonconformity.

Winterbourne-Zelstone (St. Mary)

WINTERBOURNE-ZELSTONE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Rushmore, Blandford division of Dorset, 8 miles (S. by E.) from Blandford; containing 222 inhabitants. This parish, which takes its name from a stream, or bourne, that runs through it only in winter, comprises 823½ acres; the surface is in general flat, and the soil rests on gravel. Buttons are made to a considerable extent by the females. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 3., and in the gift of J. J. Farquharson, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £239. 18.; there is a glebe-house, and the glebe contains 32½ acres. The church is ancient, and has a lofty embattled tower. Here is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.