Wothersome - Wrayton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

692-695

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'Wothersome - Wrayton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 692-695. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51432 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Wothersome

WOTHERSOME, a township, in the parish of Bardsey, Lower division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (S.) from Wetherby; containing 19 inhabitants. It comprises about 600 acres of land, set out in three farms.

Wotton (St. John the Evangelist)

WOTTON (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Dorking, First division of the hundred of Wotton, W. division of Surrey, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Dorking; containing, with the chapelry of Oakwood, 763 inhabitants. This parish, which gives name to the hundred, is about nine miles in length and one mile in average breadth; it includes Leith Hill, and comprises 4176 acres, of which 563 are common or waste. The soil is various. The lands are watered by two streams rising in the northern declivity of Leith Hill, and which, uniting, fall into the Wey near Shalford: another stream rises under the hill, and runs into the river Arun. There are considerable woods of oak, ash, beech, hazel, and birch. On the summit of Leith Hill, which is the highest in the county, Richard Hull, Esq., in 1766 erected a tower, commanding an extreme view of the Wolds of Surrey and Sussex, with the English Channel in the distance, and northward a fine prospect of Reigate and the valley of the Thames, with the hills of Harrow, Hampstead, and Highgate. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 18. 9., and in the patronage of William J. Evelyn, Esq., of Wotton House: the tithes have been commuted for £525, and there are 140 acres of glebe. The church, a handsome structure with a tower at the west end, contains numerous monuments to the Evelyn family. There is an ancient chapel at Oakwood. Some bequests have been left to the poor. John Evelyn, a great benefactor to the Royal Society, of which he was a member, and the author of Sylva and several other works, was born and buried here; and Sir Samuel Romilly resided many years in the parish.

Wotton-Abbas

WOTTON-ABBAS, a liberty, in the parish and hundred of Whitchurch-Canonicorum, union of Bridport, Bridport division of Dorset, 4¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Lyme-Regis; containing 300 inhabitants. The liberty is of great extent, stretching from the river Char to the Axe, which separates the counties of Devon and Dorset. Courts leet and baron are held; and a fair, granted in the 7th of Queen Anne, is kept on the Wednesday before the festival of St. John the Baptist, upon a lofty hill called Lambert's Castle. The summit of this hill, in the form of the letter D, is fortified with triple trenches and ramparts, inclosing twelve acres, and having several entrances.

Wotton-Under-Edge (St. Mary)

WOTTON-UNDER-EDGE (St. Mary), a markettown and parish, in the union of Dursley, Upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 19 miles (S. S. W.) from Gloucester, and 108 (W. by N.) from London; containing, with the tythings of Huntingford, Sinwell with Bradley, Simond's-Hall with Combe, and Wortley, 4702 inhabitants. The name of this place, formerly Wotton under Ridge, is descriptive of its situation beneath the western ridge of the Cotswold hills. The old town, which stood in the rear of the present, was destroyed by fire in the reign of John; the site is still termed the Old Town, and a spot there, called the Brands, is commemorative of the fire. On the erection of the new town, a market and fair, with various municipal privileges, were granted by Henry III. to Maurice, Lord Berkeley, in 1254, which laid the foundation of its subsequent importance. During the civil war of the 17th century, a garrison was maintained here in the interest of the king. The town is situated on a gentle eminence, and consists of five streets, besides the site of the old town; the houses are in general well built, and of neat appearance. It has long been celebrated for the manufacture of fine broad-cloth, which affords employment to the inhabitants of the town and vicinity; on a small stream which flows to the west, are several water-mills connected with the manufacture. The Gloucester and Bristol railway passes near the town, on the west, where is the Charfield station. The market is on Friday: there is a fair on September 25th, for cattle and cheese; and a fair for cattle on the Tuesday preceding March 25th has been established. A mayor is chosen in October, at the manorial court leet, but he has no magisterial authority; and petty-sessions for the division take place once a fortnight, on Friday. The parish comprises 4390 acres.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 10.; net income, £112; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church, which has undergone considerable repairs, is a spacious and handsome structure, having a tower with battlements and pinnacles, and containing some curious sepulchral memorials. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans. A free grammar school was established and endowed by Lady Catherine Berkeley, under letters-patent from Richard II., in 1385; and it being supposed to have become forfeited in the reign of Edward I. by the act for the dissolution of chantries, James I., in 1622, on the petition of the inhabitants, confirmed and re-established it. The annual income is £376. 12., and there are ten boys on the foundation, who are allowed £6 per annum for books and other purposes, and have the privilege of an exhibition at the university, with an allowance of £60 for that purpose. The Blue-coat school is endowed with £60 per annum from the General Hospital trust, and with the produce of sundry bequests; the income is £136. 13.: the school-house was erected about 1714, partly from the funds of Perry's estate, and partly by subscription. An hospital for twelve persons of both sexes, founded in 1630 by Hugh Perry, alderman of London; another for six aged persons, established by Thomas Dawes in 1712; and the General Hospital, form three sides of a square in Church-lane, with an open court in the middle, and a chapel at the north end. Sir Jonathan Dawes, sheriff of London, gave £1000 for the relief of the poor. On Westridge, in the parish, are the remains of a square camp called Becketsbury.

Woughton-on-the-Green (St. Mary)

WOUGHTON-on-the-Green (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Fenny-Stratford; containing 354 inhabitants. This parish, which is intersected on the east by the road from Newport-Pagnell to Aylesbury, and on the west by the Grand Junction canal, derives its name from the situation of its village round a pleasant green of oblong form, at the east end of which is the church. It comprises about 1421 acres. The soil is various, in the upper lands generally a stiff clay, and in the lower a heavy marl, alternated with gravel; the surface is varied, in some parts hilly, in others flat, and subject to inundation from a branch of the Ouse which bounds the parish on the east. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 9. 7.; net income, £107; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Francis Rose, who is lord of the manor. The church is in the later English style; in the north wall of the chancel is a full-length statue of one of the Muxon family, who are said to have been owners of a great part of the parish. About £20 per annum, arising from land, &c, are applied to the repair of the church, and the support of the poor.

Wouldham (All Saints)

WOULDHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Malling, hundred of Larkfield, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 3¼ miles (S. S. W.) from Rochester; containing 284 inhabitants. It comprises 1531a. 3r. 34p., of which 886 acres are arable, 255 pasture, 160 meadow and marsh, 156 woodland, and 16 garden-ground. The village stands on the eastern bank of the river Medway, across which is an ancient dam, supposed to have stood for nearly 1000 years. Star Castle, an old manor in the parish, is tithe-free, and another is partly so; both belonged to the abbey of West Mailing. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 6. 5½.; net income, £198; patron, the Bishop of Rochester. The church is in the early English style, and contains a Norman font: the parsonage-house has been enlarged by the incumbent.

Wrabness (All Saints)

WRABNESS (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Tendring, N. division of Essex, 6 miles (E.) from Manningtree; containing 252 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north by the navigable river Stour, and comprises by measurement 1075 acres, of which 72 are pasture, 30 woodland, and the remainder arable. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £324, and the glebe comprises 55 acres. The church is a small ancient edifice; it had originally a stone tower, which has been replaced by a belfry-turret of wood. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Wragby (All Saints)

WRAGBY (All Saints), a market-town and parish, in the union of Horncastle, W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 10½ miles (E. N. E.) from Lincoln, and 139½ (N. by W.) from London; containing 610 inhabitants. This place is noticed by Leland as giving name to a small beck, or stream, which flowed by it in its course from Panton to Bardney Abbey. It is of some antiquity, but is not distinguished by any event of historical importance. From an inconsiderable village it was raised to a market-town by George, Duke of Buckingham, who, in 1671, obtained for it the grant of a market and three annual fairs. The town is pleasantly situated on the road from Lincoln to Horncastle, at the point where it meets the road to Louth, and consists of neatly-built houses; the environs comprise an extensive tract of fertile land, in the cultivation of which the inhabitants are mostly employed. The market is on Thursday; and fairs take place on Holy-Thursday and September 29th, for sheep and cattle. The living is a vicarage, united in 1735 to the rectory of East Torrington, and valued in the king's books at £8. 4. 2.; impropriator, C. Tumor, Esq. The present church was erected in 1837-8, by the Turnor family and the parishioners, at an expense of £3500; it stands in the centre of the town. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. William Hansard, in 1632, bequeathed a rent-charge of £30 for teaching boys; and Sir Edmund Turnor, Knt., founded an almshouse for six clergymen's widows, and six widowers or widows, of Wragby, which, in 1707, he endowed with a rent-charge of £100. It was rebuilt in 1840.

Wragby (St. Michael)

WRAGBY (St. Michael), a parish, chiefly in the Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, but partly in the wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 5 miles (S. W.) from Pontefract; containing 855 inhabitants. The parish includes the townships of West Hardwick, Hessle, Hilltop, Huntwick with Foulby and Nostal, Ryhill, and Wintersett; and comprises 4l60a. 1r. 33p., whereof 1741 acres are arable, 1858 pasture, 244 woodland, and 134 water. It is intersected by the road between Doncaster and Wakefield, which runs through the village. The living is a donative, in the patronage of Charles Winn, Esq.: the church is a very neat structure in the early English style, adorned with rich wood carvings, and windows of old painted glass. An annuity of £6. 16. is paid out of the duchy of Lancaster, in support of a school.

Wragholme

WRAGHOLME, a hamlet, in the parish of Grainthorpe, union of Louth, Marsh division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 9 miles (N. N. E.) from Louth; containing 98 inhabitants.

Wramplingham (St. Peter and St. Paul)

WRAMPLINGHAM (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Wymondham; containing 236 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north by the river Yare, and comprises 951a. 12p., of which 653 acres are arable, 145 meadow and pasture, and 34 woodland and water; the surface is undulated, and the scenery pleasingly diversified. The village is situated on the bank of the Yare, and there is a large flour-mill worked both by water and steam. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 4. 9½., and in the gift of R. Marsham, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £260; the glebe comprises 34 acres. The church, which occupies an eminence; is partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, with a circular tower octangular in the upper stages; the chancel window was formerly embellished with figures of the Twelve Apostles in stained glass, of which some remains exist.

Wrangle (St. Peter and St. Paul)

WRANGLE (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Boston, wapentake of Skirbeck, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, 9 miles (N. N. E.) from Boston; containing 1132 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 18. 6½.; net income, £868; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Thomas Bailey Wright; impropriators, J. Linton and J. Roper, Esqrs. The church contains a curious monument to Sir John Reade, Knt. Thomas Alenson, in 1555, bequeathed land now producing £149. 12. per annum, a moiety of which is applied in teaching children, and the other in the maintenance of five poor people.

Wrantage

WRANTAGE, a tything, in the parish and hundred of North Curry, union of Taunton, W. division of Somerset, 5½ miles (E. by S.) from Taunton; containing 448 inhabitants.

Wratting, Great (St. Mary)

WRATTING, GREAT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 2¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Haverill; containing 355 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 1350 acres. The living is a rectory, with that of Little Wratting annexed, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £450; patron and incumbent, the Rev. T. B. Syer. Salmon supposes this place to have been the Roman station Ad Ansam, and numerous remains of Roman antiquity have been dug up.

Wratting, Little

WRATTING, LITTLE, a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 5¾ miles (W. by N.) from Clare; containing 239 inhabitants, and comprising 937a. 2r. 14p. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Great Wratting, and valued in the king's books at £4. 19. 9½. The Turnor family had formerly a seat in the parish, at Blunt's Hall.

Wratting, West (St. Andrew)

WRATTING, WEST (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Linton, hundred of Radfield, county of Cambridge, 5¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Linton; containing 912 inhabitants. This parish is so called from its position with respect to Great and Little Wratting. It comprises 3508a. 6p., of which 3131 acres are arable, 260 pasture, and 50 woodland. A pleasure-fair is held on Whit-Monday. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 3½.; net income, £215; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Ely. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1809. The church and vicarage-house were repaired and improved at an expense of £767, by Sir John Jacob, who died in 1740.

Wrawby (St. Mary)

WRAWBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing, with the town of Glandford-Brigg, 2702 inhabitants, of whom 880 are in the township of Wrawby. The parish comprises by measurement 4079 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 14. 7.; net income, £220; patrons and appropriators, the Master and Fellows of Clare Hall, Cambridge. The tithes were commuted for land under acts of inclosure of the 39th and 40th of George III.; the glebe comprises about 200 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style. There is a chapel of ease in the town.

Wraxall (St. Mary)

WRAXALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Beaminster, hundred of Eggerton, Bridport division of Dorset, 8 miles (E. by S.) from Beaminster; containing 65 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, united in 1758 to that of Rampisham, and valued in the king's books at £5: the tithes have been commuted for £165, and the glebe comprises 33 acres.

Wraxall (All Saints)

WRAXALL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Bedminster, hundred of Portbury, E. division of Somerset, 6½ miles (W. by S.) from Bristol; containing, with the tything of Failand, 986 inhabitants. It comprises 3773a. 2r. 20p.; the surface is elevated, and commands a fine view of the Bristol Channel, with the hills of Monmouthshire. The road from Bristol to Clevedon passes through the parish; and the Bristol and Exeter railway, on which is a station within 2 miles, skirts it on the south. A fair is held at the festival of Allhallows, continuing six days. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £49. 11. 8., and in the gift of the Rev. James Vaughan: the tithes have been commuted for £520; the glebe comprises 70 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school adjoining the churchyard was erected by Richard Vaughan, who endowed it with £300, the interest of which, together with about £6 a year bequeathed by Elizabeth Martindale, is applied in teaching children. On Leigh down, about a mile from Failand's Inn, in the parish, is an irregular intrenchment, and near it another of a circular form, called the Old Fort. On the same down, upon opening a tumulus in 1815, several hundred coins of the Lower Empire were discovered, with fragments of urns; and many other indications of the residence of the Romans have been observed in the neighbourhood.

Wraxall, North (St. James)

WRAXALL, NORTH (St. James), a parish, in the union and hundred of Chippenham, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts, 7 miles (W. by N.) from Chippenham; containing 481 inhabitants. It comprises about 2300 acres, of which 500 are woodland, and the remainder arable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 9. 2., and in the gift of W. Heneage, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £375, and the glebe comprises 87 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a handsome circular arched doorway and other Norman details.

Wraxall, South

WRAXALL, SOUTH, a tything, in the chapelry of Atworth, parish, union, and hundred of Bradford, Westbury and N. divisions, and Trowbridge and Bradford subdivisions, of Wilts, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Melksham; containing 359 inhabitants. Here is a chapel dedicated to St. James.

Wraxall

WRAXALL, a hamlet, in the parish of Ditcheat, union of Shepton-Mallet, hundred of Whitestone, E. division of Somerset; with 133 inhabitants.

Wray

WRAY, with Botton, a township, and an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Melling, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 10 miles (N. E. by E.) from Lancaster, on the road to Settle; containing 718 inhabitants. In the reign of Edward I., Geoffrey de Neville had a grant of free warren here. The Pooleys of Wray, and the Tunstalls of Botton, ancient and reputable families connected with the township, no longer exist. The township comprises 3760a. 3r. 33p. of inclosed land, and about 2000 acres uninclosed; the surface is undulated, the soil clay in the higher parts, and alluvial in the lower, and the scenery picturesque: most of the land is good pasture and meadow. A bed of coal, eighteen inches thick, runs through the higher portion of the township; and there are two excellent flagstone-quarries. Wray is the most populous village in the parish, and Botton one of the highest and most remote situations in the county. The Roe-burn partly propels a silk-mill, and uniting with the Hind-burn, forms the Wray beck, a tributary of the Wenning, which last river enters the Lune below Hornby. The North-Western railway into Yorkshire is distant only about half a mile. The church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, was built in 1839, on a site given by the Rev. W. E. Hoskins, of Margate; it is in the early English style, and cost £700. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Five Trustees; net income, £90, with a house built in 1846. The Society of Friends and the Wesleyans have places of worship. Richard Pooley, in 1685, bequeathed £20 for the erection of a school, and £200 to purchase land for its support; the income is about £35, which sum, with about £4 per annum arising from a bequest by Mary Thompson in 1803, is applied in aid of a parochial school.

Wrayton, Lancashire.—See Melling.

WRAYTON, Lancashire.—See Melling.



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