Perambulations of the Forest
1300

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Major-General Hon. G. Wrottesley (editor)

Year published

1884

Pages

176-180

Citation Show another format:

'Perambulations of the Forest: 1300', Staffordshire Historical Collections, vol. 5 part 1 (1884), pp. 176-180. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52376 Date accessed: 24 October 2014.


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Perambulations of the Forests of Cannock and Kinfare, 28 E. I., A.D. 1300. (fn. 1)

The King's writ states that the Commons of England had granted to him the fifteenth of all moveables, and for that he had conceded that perambulations should be made of the Forests before Roger le Brabazon and his associated Judges.

(Translation). (fn. 2)

Perambulations made in the co. of Stafford before Monsire Rogier Brabazun, Monsire William Boutevileyn, Monsire Johan Druivel, and Sire Henry de Guldeford Justices of the King, on the Wednesday in the week of Pentecost, 28 E. I. (11th June, 1300), of the Forest of Cannok, in the presence of William Trumwyn, Esteven (Stephen) de Elmedon, foresters in fee of the said forest, and in the presence of John de Heravile, Richard de Barton, and Robert de Wyston, verderers of the said forest, and by the oath of Robert de Estaundon, William de Mere, Geffrey de Gresleye, Johan le Wastenesy, Henry Mauveisyn, Henry de Cressewall, Huwe de Weston, Chevalers, Williame de Wrottesleye, (fn. 3) Robert le Hunte, Estevene de Wolaston, Richard Sprigonel, Michel de Morton, Henry de Alrewas, Robert de Somerford, Thomas de Titnesovere, Robert de Sewalffeyld, Henry de Verdoun, Williame de Tymmor, Richard de Beckebury, Robert de Horseleye, Williame de Tamenhorn, and Johan de Cressewalle, who say on their oath that the King that now is has four hayes in the said forest beyond (dehors) Wattelingestrete towards the north viz.:—the Haye of Hopewas; the Haye of Alrewas, the Haye of Teddesleye, and the Haye of Gauneleye. The Haye of Hopewas with the forinsec wood (foreinbois) commences at the river Tame at Caldeford, and then ascending Caldefordwey between the demesne of the King and the fee of the Bishop of Chester, thence to Pakynton Mere, and thence by the high way which goes to Lichfeuld as far as (deges) Tamworth, and thus descending the high road as far as the fork (fourches) of Hopewas, and thence by a footway (sente), between the wood of Pakinton and the wood of Hopewas as far as Hyntismere, and thence to Lynwell, thence to Limbreuk, which is between Hopewas wood and Tunstall wood, and thence to the Tame, and then descending the river Tame as far as Caldeford at the place where the purceynte first began. John de Hastinges holds the vill of Hopewas, together with the wood and the waste of the King within the said purceinte.

The purceynte of the King's Haye of Alrewas with the forinsec wood of Alrewas and Bromleye commences at the river Trent at Wycchenore Bridge, and thence ascending the Trente as far as the Bridge of Yoxale, and thence ascending the Trent as far as Cornbrug, thence ascending a sichet between the wood of Kyngesbromleye and Hondesacre wood to Reynershawing, and thence by the road as far as Foulbrouk, and then descending as far as Pipebrouk, and thus as far as Drubrouk, and thence to Marbrouk, descending as far as the Tame River, and then descending the Tame to the Trent, and from thence ascending the Trent as far as Wycchenovere Bridge where the purceynte first began. And within the said bounds of Alrewas, Edmund de Somerville holds the manor of Alrewas with its members, and part of the wood and waste, of our Lord the King; and Thomas Corbet holds the vill of Kyngesbromleye with the wood and the waste of our Lord the King.

The purceinte of the Haye of the King's demesne wood of Teddesleye, and of his demesne wood of Gaunelyee, including the vills and the forinsec wood commences in a place of Pencriz at Eton at a place called Stretwyle, and so descending the river of Pencriz as far as Springwell brouk, which is between the King's demesne of Teddesleye, and the liberty of the Bishop of Chester of the Barony of Heywode, thence ascending Springewall brouk as far as Springewall, and thence to Cannok, and so by the high road as far as the ditch of Saint Chadde between the King's demesne of Teddesleye and the chase of the Bishop of Chester of Cannokbury and Rugeley, and so descending by a road called Fethersti as far as the Sholle, and thence descending as far as Maresbrouk, and from thence to Watlingstrete, and descending the Watlingstrete as far as the river of Pencriz to Eton to the place called Stretwile. And within these bounds Hugh le Blund holds the vill of Wolgarston and Pencriz with the wood and the waste, of Johan Heosee. And Wautier de Elmedon holds the vill of Pilotenhale with the wood and the waste, of the Abbot of Burton: and Stephen de Elmedon holds the vill of Huntyndon with the wood and the waste, of our Lord the King; and the Dean of Wulvrenehampton holds the vill of Hatherdon with the wood and waste in free almoign together with the vill of Kynewarston, to the north of the Watling strete, of the gift of the Lady Wulverene; and Adam de Otherton holds the vill of Otherton with the wood and waste, of Richard de Loges. Richard de Loges holds the vill of Rodbaston with the wood and waste, of our Lord the King; and Wautier de Beysyn holds the vill of Eton with the wood and the waste to the north of Watlingstrete, of the Barony of Stafford. They say likewise that the bounds of Calonhethe commence from the other part of Watlingstrete towards the south, at the Stoniford, and from thence descending as far as Sarebrouk, and thence envalaunt Sarebrouk as far as the Stok Ok; and thence to Everleye in Gauneleye (Gayley).

They say also that of that part south of Watlingstrete, the King holds the Haye of Benteleye and the Haye of Christlyn in his hands. The purceinte of the Haye of Benteleye begins at Wytheressawe, descending as far as Aspenegrene, thence to Benyngeshale brouk and thence to Dyridaies medewe, and thence ascending as far as the spring of the heie Shute, and so to Ruggeleye Yort, and thence descending as far as Whelsey, thence to Haybrouk, thence to Witteressawe, where it began.

The Purceinte of the Haye of Chistlyn begins at Caldewallemore, thence to Haygate, thence by the road from Haygate to Somergate, and thence ascending by the Redewey as far as the Blakeleye, and then by the Redewey to the Great Blakeleye, thence to Horeston, under (sus) the great Blakeleye, and thence to Hostalmore, thence by a sichet as far as Chistlyn wood, and thence descending by the wood of Chistlyn as far as Sarebrook near Whitenhale, and thence ascending Sarebrok as far as the sichet by Caldewallemore, where it first began.

And they say that the bounds of Oggeleye and of Prestwode on that side of Watlingstrete towards the south commence at Rothsale, ascending Watlingstrete as far as the sichet below Occumesleye which is called Russisiche, and thence by the Russisiche as far as Erchenebrug below Cleyhunger, and so ascending the sichet by Cleyhungermore as far as Wirleyesty below Catteslowe, as far as the Blakestrete, and so descending by the valley which is called the Greneslade, as far as the Small Thornes, and so descending by the high road in the valley between Aylondes and Whitacres, and descending as far as Cronebrouk below Hulton, and so by Lichesfeldeswey as far as Watlingstrete.

And they say that Rauf Basset of Drayton holds the vills of Bollenhull, Bittrescote, Faresleye, and Tunstall, with the appurtenances, of Richard Basset of Weldon, and they have been afforested since the time of King Henry fitz Empress.

Rauf de Grendon holds of the fee of Hugh de Plescy, Overe Stonhale, Nethere Stonhale, La Lynde, Thornes, and Chestrefeud, with the woods and wastes appurtenant, and they have been afforested since the time aforesaid.

William de Alrewyz holds the vill of Alrewyz (Aldridge), with the woods and wastes appurtenant, of Felice de Barra, and they have been afforested since the time aforesaid.

William de Bouwelis holds the vill of Russhale with the woods and wastes appurtenant of the Barony of Duddeleye, and they have been afforested since the time above stated.

Roger de Morteyn and Margaret la Russe hold the vills of Blakeswych and Great Blockeswych, Shelfhull, Bermundescote, and Haworthyn, with the woods and wastes, in chief of our Lord the King, afforested since the time above stated.

Johan de Heronvill holds the vill of Wodnesbury and Walstwude, with the woods and wastes appurtenant, of Hugh de Plescy, afforested since the time above stated.

Johan de Bentleye holds the vill of Bentleye, with the woods and wastes, of our Lord the King, afforested since the time above stated.

The Dean and Chapter of Wulverenhampton hold in pure and perpetual almoign, of the gift of the Lady Wulverene, the vill of Peleshale, part of Wylenhale, Wodenesfeud, Hulton, Fethereston, Gosebrok, La Hethe, and the Newebruge, with the woods and wastes; and they have been afforested since the time above stated.

Edward, son and heir of Phelip Burnel, holds the vill of Wormdon and part of Wylenhale and Tunstall in chief of our Lord the King by exchange; and they have been afforested since the time above stated.

The Prior of St. Thomas, near Stafford, holds the vill of Pendeford, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Duddeleye; and they have been afforested since the time aforesaid.

Richard de Marham holds the vill of Oxleye, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Duddeleye, afforested since the time aforesaid.

Rauf de Bissebury holds the vill of Bissebury, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Duddeleye, afforested since the time above stated.

Robert de Esnyngton holds the vill of Esnyngton, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Duddeleye, afforested since the time above stated.

Johan de Mollesleye holds the vill of Mollesleye, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Duddeleye, afforested since the time above stated.

Otvel Purcel holds the vill of Sareshull, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Stafford, afforested since the time above stated.

William Trumwyne and Robert de Wyston hold the vill of Little Sardon, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Duddeleye, afforested since the time above stated.

William de Pole and Wlades (Gladys) his wife hold the vill of Great Sardon, with the waste and appurtenances, of Robert de Estaundon, afforested since the time above stated.

Rauf de Covene holds the vill of Covene, with the woods and waste, of the Barony of Estafford, afforested since the time above stated.

Edward, the son of Phelip Burnel, holds the vill of Brunesford, with the woods and waste, of the Barony of Duddeleye, afforested since the time above stated.

Richard de Loges holds the vill of Great Wyrleye, not afforested, of the fee of the Bishop of Chester; but the woods and the wastes of the vill have been afforested since the time above stated.

Thomas de Darlaston holds the vill of Darlaston, with the woods and wastes, of the Barony of Duddeley, afforested since the time above stated.

William de Penne holds the vill of Gorsticote, with the waste, of the Barony of Duddeley, afforested since the time above stated.

The Dean of Wulverenehampton holds part of the wood and waste in Hatherdon on the side of Watlingstrete towards the south, afforested since the time above stated.

Wautier de Beysyn holds part of the waste in Eton on the side of Watlingstrete towards the south, afforested since the time above stated.

And they say that the above-named vills, woods, and wastes on the side of Watlingstrete towards the south have been afforested since the time above stated; and being asked why they know that the woods above named have been afforested since the coronation of King Henry, the great-grandfather of the present King, they say they know it by the evidence of old people (aunciene gentz), and by those who best know the truth of the matter, and by perambulations previously made (par puralees avant fetes). Being asked what woods were afforested in the time of that King, they say they know not, but they were afforested since the coronation of the said King Henry. In testimony of which things the jurors above named have set their seals to this perambulation.

The Perambulation of the Forest of Kynefare in the County of Stafford, made before Monsire Rogier Brabazon, Sire William Boutevileyn, Sire Johan Druwel, and Sire Henry de Guldeford, Justices of our Lord the King assigned to make it, on the Saturday in the week of Pentecuste, 28 Ed. I. (14th June 1300), in the presence of Johan fitz Phelip, Warden (gardien) of the Forest, Richard de Prestwode, Forester in fee, Johan de Perton, Phelip de Lutteleye, and Waryn de Penne, Verderers of the said forest, and by the oath of Robert de Estaundon, William de Mere, Geffrey de Gresel, Johan de Wasteneys, Henry de Cressewall, Hughe de Weston, and Henry Mauveisyn, Chevalers; William de Wrottesleye, Robert le Hunt, Estevene de Wolaston, Richard Sprigornel, Michel de Morton, Henry de Alrewas, Robert de Somerford, Thomas de Tytnesovere, Robert de Sewallefeyld, Henri de Verdoun, William de Tymmor, Richard de Beckebury, Robert de Horseleye, William de Tamenhorn, Johan de Cressewall, Johan de Tresel, Mestre Robert de Kyderminstre, Clement de Dunclent, Richard de Suttone, and Thomas de Lutteleye, who state that the bounds of the said Forest of Kynefare begin at the water of Smethestall, and so descending by the Tresel water as far as the doit of Hinkesford, and thence ascending as far as the high road to Holebache, and then by the said road as far as a doit which is between the vill of Amelecote, and the vill of Kyngeswyneford, and then descending from this doit as far as the olde forde, and then ascending as far as the Ruggesende, and then ascending by a footpath (sente) as far as the Croked Apeltre, and thus as far as Wolfeswrosne, and then ascending as far as Feckebury, and so as far as Beefold, and thence to Ovemaste mere, and then ascending as far as Wheldon hulle, and thus to Durhull, and then as far as Doune Coppe, and then ascending as far as Furslades, and then as far as Berkes medwe, and so ascending by Stour water as far as a hedge which is the boundary between the manor of Kynefare and Wolvardesleye, and then by the before-mentioned hedge as far as the wood of Kynefare, and so ascending as far as the Merehul under the Stonyhul, and then ascending as far as the Mere Ok on the Egge coppe, and so descending to the high road which goes to Kideminstre, and then across (entravers) this road as far as Kyngesfordes mere, and then between the meres of Kynyngford and Kynefare as far as the boundaries of Arleye, and then between the bounds of Kynefare and Arleye as far as the bounds of Rommesleye, and then as far as Stonemonnesleye, and then ascending by the lane (venelle) as far as Hevedyord, which is as far as Depedale, and thence to Rommere, and then descending by a sichet as far as Liones meduwe, and then by the high road which is called Chestrewey as far as Spitelbrouk, and then descending as far as Fulsiche, and then ascending by Foulsiche as far as the Urlestrete, and so to Blake slouche, and then under (desuz) the Rugge as far as the Brocholes, and so to Quatsouk near Two eth, and then ascending by a road as far as the Birchles, to the Holou mereheved, and so by the said road as far as a footpath (sente) under the Sholle (desuz la Sholle), and so by this path as far as Badicoteswey, and so descending by this road to Smethestalleswey, and by Smethestallswey as far as Smethestalleford, at the place whence the bounds commence.

And they say that within these bounds exists the Forest of our Lord the King. And they say that the wood of Kyngesleye, and the manor of Tettenhale by the bounds written below are the demesne of the King in the forest, that is to say, from Whistewykeford ascending by the road which leads from Whistwyke towards Stafford as far as the mill of Rodesford, and thence to the Dounpoul, thence descending as far as Milboruwe wall, and so descending as far as the Whitebon in Saffemor, and so descending as far as Oxneford, and then ascending by a sichet as far as the high road which runs from Trescote to Wulverenhampton, and so by the said road as far as Poukediches Lydeyate, and thence by a road as far as Wythewykesforde.

And they say that the vills of Nether Penne, Overton, Tresel, and Seysdon, Womburne, and Swyndon, and a part of Humeleleye (Himley), a part of the land of Kingeswyneford, a part of the land of Amelecote (Amblecote), the vill of Wolaston, a part of Swyneford, of Pebbemor, of Haggeleye, of Brome, the vill of Chirchehull, the vill of Wennorton, a part of Yeldentre, of Chaddesle, of Hurcote, of the waste of Kyderminstre, the vills of Dunelent, Hetheye, and the vills of Wolvardesley, Kynyngford, Arleye, Evenesfeud (Enville), Morf, and Lutteley, Bobyngton, with the wood and the wastes and the appurtenances, have been afforested since the coronation of King Henry the great-grandfather of the present King. In testimony of which things the jurors above named have set their seals.

Up to this point the perambulations are in French, the following Precept by the King is added in Latin:—
"Ita quod quicquid per istas perambulationes ponitur extra forestam remaneat extra forestam, et residuum remaneat foresta secundum metas et bundas predictas in perpetuum. In cujus rei testimonium has literas nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste me ipso apud Lincoln die xiiii. Februarii, anno regni nostri vicessimo nono."

Footnotes

1 Chancery Miscellaneous Roll, No. 113, Membrane 18.
2 The Roll is in French.
3 This is William de Wrottesley the younger. His father was one of three Knights of Co. Stafford appointed by Letters Patent dated 10th May, 1300, for the better observance of the Statute of Winchester and the Carta de Forestâ. The other two were William de Stafford and Robert de Pype. Rot: Pat: 28 E. I., mem. 14.