Kalendar of Juries, 35 Edward I

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Major-General Hon. George Wrottesley (editor)

Year published

1886

Pages

172-181

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'Kalendar of Juries, 35 Edward I', Staffordshire Historical Collections, vol. 7, part 1 (1886), pp. 172-181. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52467 Date accessed: 22 November 2014.


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Stafford Kalendar of the Juries of co. Stafford on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 35 E. I. m. 16.

Hundred of Seisdon.

Philip de Lutteley.
John de Tresel.
Robert de Sewalle. Geoffrey de Belston.
William atte horewode.
John de Mollesley.
Richard de Beckebury.
Roger de Hexstan.
Richard Adam de Lutteley.
Thomas atte Broke.
John de Prees.
Thomas de Overton.

Hundred of Pirehull.

Robert de Staundon.
Robert de Dutton.
Adam de Monckeston.
Richard de Verney of Madleye.
Henry de Verdoun.
Henry de Hexstall.
Ralph de Grendon.
William de Breydeshale.
Ralph Clerk of Bromleye.
William de Chaveldon.
Ralph de Hampton.
John de Cresswelle.

Hundred of Tatemaneslowe.

William Wyther.
John de Casterne.
Richard de Kavereswall.
John de Ipestanes.
William son of Robert de Kavereswalle.
Ithelus le Wariner.
Adam de Beveresford.
John de Prestwode.
Henry Ouweyn.
William de la Blakeleye.
Robert de Bradeheved.
Ralph Basset.

Hundred of Offelowe.

Thomas de Hampstede.
John de Heronville.
Robert Touke.
William de Boweles.
Thomas de Derlaston.
William Alrewych.
William de Sparham.
William de Stretton.
Gilbert le Hunte.
Osbert de Thamworth.
William Morel.
William de Jarkeville.

Hundred of Cutholeston.

William de Wolseleye.
Robert de Whiston.
Robert Morice.
Peter de Jonestone.
Adam de Otherton.
Robert de Bigesford.
William de Kavereswell.
Richard le Palmer of Burton.
William Walter of Pylatynhale.
Thomas Willames of Eyton.
Ralph de Covene.
Hugh de Wyverestone.

Vill of Stafford.

John de Wenlok.
Robert Selimon.
William Reiner.
Henry Grukot.
Robert le Rotour.
Simon Rondulf.
Philip le Goldfynch.
Robert le Barber.
Richard de Offileye.
Roger Raulot.
Hugh Lambard.
John Warmete.

Liberty of Bromlegh Regis.

William atte Cros.
William atte Ford.
Reginald Makerel.
Robert le Palmer.
Robert le Wodeward.
Henry le Palmer.
William Dynot.
Robert Gerveyse.
William atte Westend.
Robert le Chapmon.
Richard Note.
John Penek.

Liberty of Alrewas.

Hugh Bernard.
William Uppegrene.
William Franceys.
Nicholas le Byker.
Henry Lacy.
Gilbert Owyn.
Richard Heryng.
Hugh le Provost.
Henry le Provost.
Richard son of Robert.
Robert the Smith (Faber).
Henry Bernard.

Liberty of Seggele (Segdley).

Thomas de Mounshull.
Nicholas de Blakemore.
John atte Hayestonwe.
John Iweyn.
William Collettes.
Robert de Dorleston.
Geoffrey le Wodeward.
Richard de Alcote.
Richard Henry.
Peter de Brameshulle.
Henry atte halle.
Thomas de Flexle.

Liberty of Tuttenhale (Tettenhall).

William Owayn.
Oliver atte Mull.
William the Miller.
William Tandy.
William son of Thomas.
Thomas le Charpenter.
Henry de Barnehust.
Thomas de Crassewalle.
William Bylebrok.
John son of Henry.
John de Holsroue.
Walter Odys.

Vill of Lychfeld.

John de Pype.
William de Hampton.
Richard le Coylter.
John Lovet.
Giles of Worcester.
Richard Atte Walle.
John de Orgrave.
Henry Michel.
John de Catton.
William le Spencer.
Nicholas le Galeys.
Richard Welykemd.

Lychfeld Foreign.

John de la Burne.
William de Hondesacre.
John de Colewiz.
John de Essemeresbrok.
Richard de Wolseley.
Henry de Haywode.
Hugh le Ridere.
Richard de Benteleye.
Reginald le Rous.
Thomas de Engelwode.
Adam Trumwyne.
Reginald de Nyweport.
Roger le Heuster.
Richard le Wryghte of Longedon.

Liberty of Eccleshale.

Robert de Horseleye.
Peter de Hakedone.
Adam de Wethales.
William le Parker of Ulsale.
Henry de Knyston.
Robert le Eyi of Podemor.
John de Segenhulle.
Richard le Barker.
Roger le Mareschal.
Stephen le Jeovene.
Robert de Waleford.
Roger de Knistele.

Liberty of Wolrenehampton.

Roger atte Necheles.
Nicholas son of Richard.
Nicholas le Barker of Codeshale.
Richard de Hulton.
Nicholas de Hulton.
John son of John de Kynvaston.
Nicholas Bate.
William de Saltford.
Walter Page.
John Derkyn.
Richard de Ruycroft.
Thomas Simon of Bulston.

Liberty of Alveton.

Richard de Acovere.
Ralph de Rudeyurd.
Robert le Eyr.
Richard son of Ralph.
Richard de Holies.
Robert le Fremon.
Peter de Bothes.
Henry Bate.
Robert Bataylle.
Henry del Hay.
John Bolle.
Robert de Holyes.

Liberty of Swynefford (Swinford).

Richard Spany.
Elias de Bredhull.
Richard de Wykynghull.
Richard de Holebach.
John Hawote.
Richard Benet.
Walter son of Thomas.
Thomas de Calverhull.
John de Ryggeleye.
Henry de Merssh.
Nicholas de Merssh.
Robert de Oldefeld.

Liberty of Burton.

Robert de Meysham.
Adam Toke.
Richard de Streton.
Henry le Skynner.
Henry Logge.
Richard Skermore.
Richard Page.
Nicholas the Clerk.
Robert Noreys.
John le Waleshe.
John Norreys.
Hugh de Swynescou.

Liberty of Tamelworth (Tamworth).

John Cocus.
Richard Sarch.
Gilbert de Dersthull.
Richard Doun.
Alan Serich.
Philip le Bray.
William Here.
Alan de Cotes.
John Kulyng.
Alan de Wygynton.
Walter de Glascote.
Alan son of Thomas.

Liberty of Pencriz.

Henry in le Schoppe.
Thomas de Longerygg.
William Godwyne.
William Hanek.
Robert atte Brok.
John le Waite.
Richard le Mercer.
John le Breuster.
Thomas Atte tounesyend.
Thomas Amyot.
William de Wolgaston.
John Colyng of Longerygg.

Liberty of Bradelegh.

William le Palmer.
William de Scradeyete.
Richard le Clet of Burton.
William Stoumel.
Richard Attewell.
Robert le Brune.
Nicholas de la Doune.
Richard Kyry.
Richard de la Doune.
Adam Henry of Scradycote.
Richard de Reuwel.
Hammond de Bourewe.

Liberty of Mere.

John Borstax.
Richard de Monte.
Richard le Palmer.
John Atte tounesyende.
William de Akylot.
William Piscator (the Fisher).
William son of Thomas.
William son of Robert.
William Faber (the Smith).
John de Dunton.
Thomas atte Louwe.
John Traynnel.

Liberty of Kynefare.

Robert Launfrey.
Walter de Lutteley.
William de Weston.
William de la Louwe.
Walter de Herl.
Richard de Buttunhulle.
Henry Goudwyne.
William le Moygne.
Walter Aleyn.
John atte Holy.
Walter Dessefen.
William Alrych.

Liberty of the Town of Newcastle.

Adam son of Thomas.
Robert le Got.
Jordan son of Hugh.
Roger de Swerkeston.
John Organ.
Richard de Stowele.
Henry Hogh.
Geoffrey de Lylleshull.
Richard de Trentham.
Roger de Bertonleye.
William de Blorton.
Henry son of Peter.

The Foreign Liberty of Newcastle.

Roger de Baggenhull.
Ralph de Bromleye.
Robert de Knotton.
William de Bromleye.
Elias de Bromleye.
Richard de Holedich.
Robert de Hanleye.
Stephen Austyn.
Roger de Heneford.
Roger Meyroun.
Elias de Knotton.
Nicholas de Holedych.

Liberty of Tutteburi.

William de Rideware.
William le Child.
Robert de Cotene.
Gilbert de Ansideleye.
Philip de la Wodehouse.
William de Wilhale.
Nicholas le Mercer.
Henry le Messager.
John Stallworthemon.
Henry de Hales.
Henry de la Haye.
Roger de Workesworth.

Pleas before the same Justices at Stafford on the Monday after the Quindene of Holy Trinity. 35 E. I.

The Hundred of Pyrhull appeared by twelve jurors and stated (inter alia) that:—

Richard de Blourton the brother of James Blourton had killed Thomas Hap at Blourton, in 21 E. I., and had fled. He is therefore to be proclaimed and outlawed. His chattels were worth 5s. 10d., for which J. de Dene the Sheriff is answerable.

Robert son of the widow of Wolseleye had killed Robert Wygan at Cletton Griffyn, in 21 E. I., and had fled. He had no chattels.

Nicholas de Swerkeston of Newcastle killed Robert son of Thomas Swenyld outside the vill of Newcastle, 23 E. I., and fled. He is therefore to be outlawed. He had no chattels.

Thomas the Miller of Halgton killed Nicholas le Oterhunter in the high road of Foulwey at Ronton, 23 E. I., and fled. He is therefore to be outlawed. He had no chattels.

The Sheriff returned 4d. as the value of the chattels of Ralph son of Ralph de Wasteneys, and 13s. 2d. as the value of the chattels of Richard Vernise of Stafford, felons who had abjured the kingdom, and 12d. for the chattels of Richard Revel, who had fled.

Adam le Teynturer killed Henry son of John fitz Alan at Swynnerton, 23 E. I., and fled; he had no chattels. To be outlawed.

Eynon the groom of the Bishop of St. Asaph, killed Madoc, his companion in the Priory of St. Thomas near Stafford, 23 E. I., and fled. To be outlawed. He had no chattels.

Roger son of John de Eyton of Asseleye (Ashley), killed Robert son of Geoffrey le Reneyde in the wood of Rounhay, 24 E. I., and fled. To be outlawed. He had no chattels.

Henry de Derbyshire, of Mulnemes, killed Richard son of Stephen de Mulnemes (Millmease), at Mulnemes, and fled. He was afterwards taken and hanged. Value of his chattels 30s. 4d.

Henry Pollard, of Newcastle, killed Geoffrey de Cnoutton in the fields of Newcastle in 25 E. I., and fled. To be outlawed. He had no chattels.

Geoffrey son of Reginald de Onyleye killed John his brother in the vill of Onyleye, 25 E. I., and fled. To be outlawed. His chattels were worth 6d.

Of gates, they say that the vill of Stafford is enclosed by a wall . . . . are not shut according to statute. (fn. 1) The vill was fined.

Of arms, they say the men of the Hundred have sufficient.

Of watches, they say that the vills of the Hundred do not keep watch according to Statute. They are therefore in misericordiâ.

Of constables, they say that Roger de Walton and Thomas de Tuttensovere (Tittensor) were constables, and are both dead. The constables newly elected and sworn are William Gryffyn and William de Chaveldon. m. 17.

The Hundred of Offelowe appeared by twelve jurors.

Of felonies, they say that Thomas de Naveby, Hugh Corbet, and William son of Robert de Venables the Rector of the Church of Ibestoke had killed Geoffrey le Sauser, the cook of Hugh le Despencer, in the wood of Canoc near Hedenesford, and had robbed him of goods of the value of (a blank) in 34 E. I. Thomas and Hugh had fled; they are therefore to be outlawed. They had no chattels, and William son of Robert was taken, and is in gaol at this place. He afterwards appeared before the Justices and refused to put himself on the country, and was remitted to prison ad penam.

Adam Tollet killed Geoffrey le Mouner of Little Barr in his house, 28 E. I., and fled. To be outlawed. He had no chattels.

Some unknown malefactors robbed John de Myners of his harness (armour), and of goods to the value of 20s., in 21 E. I., in the wood of the Abbot of Burton which is called Rohay, and the high road which leads from Tuttebury to Lychefeld lies within the wood, and has not been cleared according to Statute. The Sheriff is therefore to summon the Abbot to be before the Justices after the Feast of St. Barnabas. A postscript states that the Abbot appeared and stated the road had been sufficiently cleared and deprived of underwood according to Statute, and appealed to a jury, which found in his favour.

Respecting parks, they say that the Abbot of Hales Oweyn has a park at Bromwych through the middle of which runs the high road between Burmyngham and the vill of Stafford, and it had not been cleared according to Statute. The Abbot was therefore summoned before the Justices, and denied that any high road ran through his park, and appealed to a jury. The jury stated that the only right of way through the park was at the will of the Abbot.

Of Watches they say that the vills of the Hundred do not set watches according to the Statute; they are therefore in misericordiâ.

Of Arms they say the Hundred has sufficient.

Of Constables they say that Richard de Norton and Robert de Meleburn were constables at the time of the said Statute, and did not perform their duties according to the Statute, so far as the view of arms was concerned, and the said Richard and Robert being in court could not deny this. They therefore found bail to appear in the Court of King's Bench (coram Rege).

The Hundred of Totemaneslowe appeared by twelve jurors and presented (inter alia):—

That Robert son of Douce of Chedle had feloniously killed Roger son of Hugh de Lutlehay in the high road at Chedle in 34 E. I. and had fled. He is therefore to be outlawed; he had no chattels.

William de Talke is a common robber of oxen and cows, and had stolen a colt from William de Hodynet of Draicote in the fields of Draicote in 34 E. I. and had fled; he is therefore to be outlawed; he had no chattels.

Roger son of Hugh le Mouner (Miller) of Dulverne had killed Richard son of Richard de Staunton in the vill of Dulverne in 34 E. I. and had fled. To be outlawed.

And they say that Robert Galpyn of Chedle by reason of his power (fn. 2) had taken Ralph Nodyan of Chedle, and had caused him to be arrested until he had made a fine of 100s., of which he had paid 4s. to the said Robert, and Robert was in Court, and being questioned on the subject, could not deny it; he was therefore committed to gaol. He afterwards made fine of half a mark (for his release).

Of Watches they say that all the vills of the Hundred do not keep watch according to the Statute. It is therefore in misericordiâ.

Of Constables they say that . . . de Beveresford (Beresford) and John de Casterne were constables from the date of the Statute, and had not executed the office according to the form of the Statute. They are therefore to find bail to appear coram Rege at Michaelmas.

The Hundred of Seysdone appeared by twelve jurors, who presented (inter alia). m. 18:—

That Henry son of William the Sacristan, of Hampton, had broken open the coffer (coffrum) of Geoffrey de Billestone, and had stolen from it £15 in the Church of Hampton; and he was taken immediately afterwards, and was hanged by the Justices, as appears on the roll of Gaol Delivery.

William son of William Orldrych, of Wrottesleye, had killed Roger atte More, of Patyngham at Trescote, and had fled. He is therefore to be outlawed; he had no chattels.

Walter de Coven had killed by night Philip del Hoo, at Bradele, in 20 E. I., and had fled; to be outlawed, etc.

John son of Louke, of Patyngham, had killed Richard the Provost of Perton, at Perton, in 32 E. I., and had fled; to be outlawed, etc.

John de Bagesovere Chaplain of Honyleye, had killed Hugh de Hales his clerk at Hampton, and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

Walter de Strattonsdale had killed Roger Peese at Patteleshull, and had fled; to be outlawed, etc.

Respecting roads which had not been cleared, they say that on the high road under the vill of Billingbrok, there is a copse of alder (alnetum), in which malefactors can lie in ambush, and which had not been cleared according to the Statute, and Nicholas the tanner, Richard le Norreys, Roger atte Lane, and Adam Gilberd hold the alders on one side of the road, and Robert Knyght and William le Wyse on the other side; and the said Nicholas and the others being present in Court, were questioned on the subject, and could not deny the above facts. They are therefore in misericordiâ. (They were fined 20d. each, and were ordered by the Justices to remove the alders, and if they did not do so, the Sheriff was to make the clearance.)

Respecting parks they say that William son of Oliver de Whitewyke, Clerk, Henry Clerk of Tetenhale, and Walter Chaplain of Tetenhale, had broken into the park of John de Somery at Doddeleye, and had taken venison from it; the Sheriff was ordered to produce them before the Court, and he returned they could not be found, and held nothing within his bailiwick. He afterwards returned they had fled, and they are therefore to be outlawed. William son of Oliver afterwards appeared, and because the breaking into the park took place in this year, he is released from the suit of the King, and the lord of the park can sue him if he pleases.

Respecting Watches they say that all the vills of the Hundred do not keep watch according to the Statute. It is therefore in misericordiâ.

Of Arms they say that all the men of the Hundred have sufficient.

Respecting Constables they say that Thomas de Mounshull and John de Cadebury have been constables since the date of the Statute, and John had died and Thomas was ill (languidus).

The constables newly elected and sworn were Richard de Beckebury and William de Fynchingefeld.

The Hundred of Cutheston appeared by twelve jurors, and presented (inter alia):—

That William son of Sybil de Weston had killed by night John the Clerk of William Wither in the fields of Blumenhull (Blymill) in 34 E. I., and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.; his chattels were worth 12d.

Bertram son of Peter de Gnoueshale had killed William de Donyngton at night in Gnoshale in this year, 35 E. I., and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

William Pygot of Cotes had killed Richard his brother at Coldefeld in Gnoshale in 33 E. I., and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

Robert son of Adam de Byllynton had killed Richard Prodome at Byllynton in 26 E. I., and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

Adam son of Robert le Rider of Eton, junior, had killed William son of Robert de Brewode in the high road at Cothelstonbrugge, and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

John Braundon had killed Richard son of Roger in the vill of Castre (Castro Baronis), and had feloniously burnt the house of Richard Coc in Forbrugge in 27 E. I., and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

William Baret living at Erkalwe, with others unknown, had broken by night into the house of Richard de Pycheford, and had stolen goods from it to the value of 100s. in 29 E. I. He had fled, and is to be outlawed, etc.

Of Watches they say that all the vills of the Hundred do not keep watch according to the Statute. The Hundred is therefore in misericordiâ.

Of Arms they say that all the men of the Hundred are sufficiently armed.

Of Constables they say that John de Say had been constable from the date of the Statute until now, but he was ill and unable to carry out the duties. Matthew de Congreve and Robert de Onyteshay are therefore elected constables in his place, and are sworn in. m. 18.

The vill of Tutteburi appeared by twelve jurors and presented, etc. William Child was sworn in as Constable. m. 18, dorso.

The Liberty of Eccleshale appeared by twelve jurors and presented (inter alia) that:—

The Prior of Ware held the wood of Westwode, through the middle of which ran a high road leading from Gnoushale to Neubork, and the road had not been cleared of underwood according to the Statute. The Prior was therefore summoned before the Justices, and did not appear; and the Sheriff was ordered to distrain and produce him at Brome on the Vigil of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist; on which day the Prior appeared and stated that no high road ran through the wood in question, and that Neubork is not a trading town (villa mercatoria), and appealed to a jury; the case was respited till the next coming of the Justices, and the sureties of the Prior were Robert le Mareschal of Aston, John de Cotes, Robert de Hampton, and William de Burgo. Afterwards the King sent to the Justices a writ to say that the Prior of Ware was suing coram nobis Richard Parson of Hunington at the date he was summoned before the Justices at Stafford, and he was not therefore to be put to any default for his non-appearance; dated 16th June, 35 E. I.

The vill of Burton appeared by twelve jurors and presented, etc. (nothing of interest). The constables of the vill were John Proutfot and Adam Touk. m. 18, dorso.

The vill of Stafford appeared by twelve jurors and presented (inter alia) that Henry son of Thomas de Mefford had killed John de Lega the servant of John de Cressewall in Stafford, and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

John Sabyn had killed Richard de Huccesdon in the vill of Stafford, and had fled. To be outlawed, etc.

Henry de Gloucestre had killed Nicholas de Hambryton (Amerton) in the vill of Stafford, and had fled; to be outlawed, etc.

Of Watches they say that no watch is kept at any of the gates of the town, and the gates are not closed according to the Statute. The vill is therefore in misericordiâ. The vill afterwards made fine of 20 marks for all defaults.

The constables newly elected were Philip le Orfever and Roger Raulot.

The Liberty of Bradelegh appeared by twelve jurors and presented (inter alia) that:—

Hugh Alote of Mutton had killed Geoffrey de Wolaston in the vill of Albeton (Apeton) during the night in 27 E. I., and had fled; he is therefore to be outlawed. His chattels were worth £4 16s. 6d.

John de Braundon and John de Coupland had killed John de Leyg and William Greidur by night in the fields of Tillynton in 23 E. I., and had fled. John de Braundon was afterwards taken and hanged; his chattels were worth 10s. 1d.; and John Coupland was afterwards beheaded; he had no chattels.

Of roads which had not been cleared they say that Vivian de Chedewynd holds a wood at Crowallemor through which the high road to Stafford ran, and it had not been cleared according to the Statute, and Vivian was in Court, and being questioned respecting it, stated he had only held the wood for a month before the coming of the Justices. He is therefore ordered to clear the road (de die in diem) according to the Statute.

Of constables they say that Robert de Bradeleye, who had died, and Robert de Marisco, who is languidus, have been constables since the date of the Statute William le Paumer was elected in their place. m. 19.

The Liberty of Tettenhale appeared by twelve jurors and presented that:—

Hugh son of William de Ford of Cumpton had killed John his brother in the vill of Cumpton in 26 E. I., and had fled. He is therefore to be outlawed; his chattels were worth 2s.

William de Holegreve had stolen a colt of Henry fitz Alote worth 5s. in the fields of Oken, and had fled; to be outlawed, etc.

Of Watches they say that the vill does not set watches according to the Statute; it is therefore in misericordiâ.

Of Arms they say all the men of the Liberty have sufficient.

Respecting Constables they say that the constables of the Hundred of Seysdon had been substituted for the constables of the vill.

The vill of Lichfeld appeared by twelve jurors, who presented (inter alia) that:—

William de Eyton of co. Salop had stolen two ruscas aprum from Robert le Blomere of Tybynton, and he is a common robber. He had fled, and had no chattels; to be outlawed, etc.

John de Klynton (Clinton) lord of Staunton took eight oxen belonging to Walter de Strangelford at la Hyde near Brewode in the court of Thomas de la Hyde in 30 E. I., and drove them to his manor of Stanton in co. Salop, and had appropriated them to himself, and he is a fugitive. He is therefore to be outlawed, etc. He had no chattels. (fn. 3)

They say that Richard Austyn of Norton, and John son of Thomas Tromewyne of Canok had beaten John le Knyght for a sum of 4s., which John Knoke had given them to do it. John Knoke denied the fact, and put himself on the country. A jury stated he was guilty, and he was committed to gaol. He afterwards made fine of half a mark for his release. m. 20, dorso.

The other towns named on membrane 16 appeared each by twelve jurors, but the presentments made contain nothing of interest.

Gaol Delivery of Stafford made before the same Justices on the Monday after the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 35 E. I.

Tatemonslowe. Roger de Budulf (Biddulph), and William his brother, indicted for the death of Alice daughter of Emma le Baggere of Kyngesleye, John Wildegous of Bradenop, and three others, indicted for stealing three oxen and four cows from Walter de Harpeford, at Harpeford; John son of Adam de Grendon, indicted for a burglary at the Grange of the Prior of Tuttebury at Wetton, and stealing three quarters of oats, and eight other prisoners, are acquitted by the jury of Totmonslowe.

Cotheleston. William le Keu of Pelsale indicted for stealing a pig in the wood of Esynton, John de Beghterton, living in Little Onne, indicting for carrying away the fish of the Abbot of Lylleshull from his fish pond in Lousyord by right; Robert son of John de Onne, indicted for the same; John formerly servant of the Vicar of Hales, indicted for breaking by night into the chamber of the Vicar at Hales, and stealing £7, were acquitted by the jury of the Hundred. m. 21.

Uffelowe (Offlow). John Waldeschef indicted for stealing horses and oxen, and three other prisoners, were acquitted. William son of Robert de Venables, the Rector of the Church of Ipstoke, indicted for the death of Geoffrey le Keu, feloniously killed at Kannockburi, refused to put himself on the country, and was remitted to prison, ad penam. He had no chattels; but the chattels found upon him, and which belonged to the said Geoffrey, were valued at £10 18s. 10d., for which the Sheriff is answerable. m. 21.

Seysdon. William Felice of Netherpenne and William his son, indicted for the death of William Salomon, a servant of the Dean of Wolvernehampton; William son of William Felice of Eyton, indicted for the death of Richard Page, and John Corsey of Rouley, indicted for the death of Henry Orm of Rouley, are acquitted. Hervey son of William Sextyn (Sacristan) of Hampton, indicted for breaking into the Church of Wolvernehampton, and stealing a decretal of Magister Geoffrey de Billeston, was found guilty and hanged.

Pyrhull. Adam son of Robert le Kyng of Tunstall, indicted for the death of John son of Robert de Chelle; Adam del Peek, indicted for breaking into the chamber of Roger Bidulf by night, and taking goods to the value of 20s., and four others indicted for felony, are acquitted. m. 21.

Walter de Aust of co. Gloucester, indicted for receiving Thomas the servant of John de Myners, who had been outlawed for the death of Nicholas son of Henry le Keu, had been put into the exigend and had afterwards surrendered and been bailed by Hugh de Hanyate, Walter de Strangilford, Adam de Otherton, Richard of the Churchyard of Alrewych, Hugh de Alreschawe, Geoffrey de Asthull, Richard de Burton, William le Say of Wyreley, Nicholas de Walshale, John de Mollesleye, William Motoun of Alrewych, and Thomas de Stonleye of Ruggeleye, who did not appear. The Sheriff was therefore ordered to produce the manucaptors, and they were committed to gaol and afterwards released for a fine of 12 marks. Afterwards P. de Malolacu (Maulake) and his fellow Justices testified by their writ that Walter on the date in question was in prison at Warwick. The fine of the manucaptors was therefore remitted.

Thomas Lotekyn of Wenwes in Keel, indicted for the death of Robert de Wenwe killed in the fields of Keel; Stephen de Slyndon, indicted for the death of Thomas de Banham of Colton, and John Godhyme of Whitemore, indicted for the death of Geoffrey Trottok, produced King's letters of pardon; viz., Thomas produced a pardon dated from Canterbury, 17th March, 26 E. I.; Stephen produced a pardon dated from Farnham, 5th August, 22 E. I., and he produced also letters of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, which testified that he was in the service of the King in Gascony, and dated from Bayonne, 15th March, 25 E. I.; and the said John produced a pardon from Lyngeston, 23rd February, 27 E. I.; and proclamation being made if anybody appeared to prosecute them, none appeared, ideo firma pax eis inde conceditur.

Footnotes

1 i.e., the Statute of Winchester. See Introduction to the Pleas in this Volume.
2 i.e., as Bailiff of the hundred or as provost of the vill.
3 i.e., no chattels within the county of Stafford.