Lancashire Fines
11-15 Edward II

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

William Farrer (editor)

Year published

1902

Pages

25-47

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'Lancashire Fines: 11-15 Edward II', Final Concords for Lancashire, Part 2: 1307-77 (1902), pp. 25-47. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=52547 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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11–15 Edward II

79. At Westminster, at one month from the day of St. Michael, 11 Edward II. [27th October, 1317].

Between John, son of Thomas de Halghton, plaintiff, and Adam de Halghton, (fn. 1) deforciant of 2 messuages, 12½ acres of land, and 2 acres of meadow in Aspul and Wygan.

John acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Adam, for which Adam granted them to John, to have and to hold to him and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of John.

80. At Westminster, on the Octave of St: Michael, 11 Edward II. [6th October, 1317].

Between Roger de Cattelowe, plaintiff, and Robert del Holt and Agnes, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 24 acres of land, and 5 acres of meadow in Chirche.

Robert and Agnes acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Roger, for which Roger granted them to Robert and Agnes; to have and to hold of the said Roger and his heirs for the lives of the said Robert and Agnes, rendering a rose by the year at the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist for all service, custom, and exaction. After the decease of Robert and Agnes, the said tenements to revert to Roger and his heirs.

81. At Westminster, on the Quindene of St. Michael, II Edward II. [13th October, 1317].

Between William, son of Richard de Hogwyk and Beatrice, his wife, plaintiffs, by Robert de Pinington put in the place of Beatrice by the King's writ, and Simon, son of Richard de Hoghwyk, deforciant of a moiety of the manor of Hoghwyk [Howick].

William acknowledged the said moiety to be the right of Simon, for which Simon granted it to William and Beatrice for their lives, after their decease to remain to Richard, their son, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to John, brother of the said Richard, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to William, brother of the said John, and his heirs.

William de Chyrinton, Abbot of Evysham [Evesham], put in his claim.

82. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter, 11 Edward II. [7th May, 1318].

Between William de Sotheworth, plaintiff, and Thomas, son of William de Sotheworth, deforciant of the manor of Upperouthecliff [U p-rawcliffe], except 2 messuages, and 2 oxgangs and 42 acres of land in the same manor.

William granted the said manor to Thomas, to have and to hold to him and the heirs of his body, of William and his heirs for ever, rendering 40li. by the year during William's life, and a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist to the heirs of William. In default to remain to Adam, brother of the said Thomas, and the heirs of his body, in default to revert to the said William and his heirs, for which Thomas gave to the said William 100 marks.

83. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 11 Edward II. [2nd July, 1318].

Between Anabilla Fytoun, plaintiff, and Henry Bille, deforciant of a moiety of the manor of Roughford [Rufford].

Anabilla acknowledged the said moiety to be the right of Henry, for which Henry granted it to Anabilla, to have and to hold to her and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to John de Heskayth and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of Anabilla. (fn. 2)

84. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Holy Trinity, 11 Edward II. [2nd July, 1318].

Between John Le Flemyng and Isabella, his wife, plaintiffs, by Thomas de Byngham put in Isabella's place by the King's writ, and Robert Le Flemyng, deforciant of the manor of Croston.

John acknowledged the said manor to be the right of Robert, for which Robert granted it to John and Isabella, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of John. (fn. 3)

85. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Martin, 11 Edward II. [18th November, 1317].

Between Henry, son of Henry du Lee, clerk, plaintiff, by Henry de Legh put in his place, and William, son of Adam Le Demande [Doomsman], of Dounlitherland, deforciant of 6d. of rent and 11/6 roods of land in Dounlitherlond [Downlitherland].

William granted the said rent to Henry, together with the homage and the whole service of Richard, son of Richard, son of Alice de Dounlitherlond, and his heirs for all the tenements which he formerly held of the said William, in the said town, to have and to hold to him and to his heirs for ever. Moreover, William remitted and quit-claimed all rights which he had in the said land to Henry and his heirs, for which Henry gave him 20s.

This concord was made in the presence of Richard, and he did homage and fealty to Henry in the Court.

86. At Westminster, on the morrow of St. Martin, 11 Edward II. [12th November, 1317].

Between John de Horneby, plaintiff, and John de Tatham, deforciant of the manor of Ireby, and of taking reasonable estovers in 3,000 acres of wood of the said John de Tatham in Tatham for burning and building within the said manor, and for making ploughs, oxen yokes, and waggons, with free and sufficient ingress and egress to seek and carry the said estovers.

John de Tatham acknowledged the said manor and estovers to be the right of John, and rendered the said manor to him in the Court, to have and to hold to him and his heirs for ever. He also granted to John to take the said estovers for himself and his heirs for ever, for which John de Horneby gave him 200 marks. (fn. 4)

87. At Westminster, at three weeks from Easter day, 11 Edward II. [16th May, 1318].

Between Edmund de Nevill, plaintiff, by Robert de Berewyk put in his place, and Mabel de Haghe, deforciant of a messuage and 2 carucates of land in Worthington.

Mabel acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Edmund, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which Edmund gave her 100 marks.

William de Bradesehahe, William de Worthington, (fn. 5) and Ellen de Rokkelegh put in their claims.

88. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 11 Edward II. [1st July, 1318].

Between Margery, daughter of Richard de Radeclif, plaintiff, by Robert de Pynygton put in her place by the King's writ, and William Le Barker of Stopport, and Ameria, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 10 acres of land, 5 acres of meadow, and 7 acres of wood in Bury.

William and Ameria granted the said tenements to Margery for her life, after her decease to remain to Henry, son of Henry de Bury, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to Alice, sister of Henry, son of Henry, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Agnes, sister [of the said Alice] and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Margery, sister of the said Agnes, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to John, son of Matthew de Bury, and his heirs, for which Margery, daughter of Richard, gave to William and Ameria 100 marks.

89. At Westminster, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 12 Edward II. [13th October, 1318].

Between William Bryde, plaintiff, and William de Worthinton and Alice, his wife, deforciants of 6 messuages, 76 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow, 12 acres of wood, 12 acres of moor, 8 acres of marsh, and a moiety of a mill in Worthington.

William de Worthington acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of William, for which William de Bryde granted them to William and Alice, to have and to hold 2 messuages, 45 acres of land, and 5 acres of meadow, lying in a place called "Turleghmore," for their lives, after their decease to remain to Hugh, son of the said William de Worthington, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to John, brother of the said Hugh, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of the said John. The residue to William de Worthington and Alice, and the heirs of William.

Henry, son of William de Worthynton, and Henry, son of John Le Waleys, put in their claims.

90. At Westminster, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 12 Edward II. [13th October, 1318].

Between James, son of Geoffrey de Walton in Le Dale, plaintiff, by Oliver de Stanesfeld put in his place by the King's writ, and Richard, son of Geoffrey Banastre, and Joan, his wife, deforciants of 8 acres of land in Walton in Le Dale.

Richard and Joan remitted all rights to James and his heirs, for which James gave them 10li.

91. At Westminster, on the Octave of the Purification, 12 Edward II. [9th February, 1319].

Between William, son of William de Moselegh, and Emma, his wife, plaintiffs, and Richard de Moselegh, deforciant of 2 messuages, 100 acres of land, 12 acres of meadow, and 200 acres of pasture in Asshton under Lyne.

William acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Richard, for which Richard granted them to William and Emma, to have and to hold to them and the heirs male issuing of their bodies, of Richard and his heirs, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. In default of issue male to revert to Richard and his heirs.

92. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter, 12 Edward II. [22nd April, 1319].

Between Roger de Middelton and Agnes, his wife, plaintiffs, by Robert de Pynyton, put in her place by the King's writ, and Henry de Orell and Cecilia, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 8 acres of land, 5 acres of meadow, and 3 acres of wood in Middelton.

Henry and Cecilia granted the said tenements to Roger and Agnes, to have and to hold to them and the heirs male issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to Matilda, daughter of Roger, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Ellen, sister of Matilda, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Alice, sister of Ellen and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Margaret, sister of Alice, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Margery, sister of Margaret, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to the right heirs of the said Roger, for which Roger and Agnes gave them 10 marks. (fn. 6)

93. At Westminster, at one month from the day of St. Michael, 12 Edward II. [27th October, 1318].

Between Peter, son of Richard Le Molineus, of Sefton, plaintiff, by John de Blakeburn, put in his place by the King's writ, and Margery, daughter of Robert Gogh, deforciant of a messuage, 1 oxgang and 1½ acres of land in Ins. [Ince-Blundell].

Margery acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Peter, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which Peter gave her 10 marks.

94. At Westminster, at one month from the day of St. Michael, 12 Edward II. [27th October, 1318].

Between Walter de Aghton, plaintiff, by John de Blakeburn put in his place by the King's writ, and Robert del Wode and Beatrice, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and 5 acres of land in Aghton [Aughton], near Ormeskirke.

Robert and Beatrice acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Walter, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which Walter gave them 10 marks.

95. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 12 Edward II. [6th October, 1318].

Between Roger de Assheton and Alice, his wife, plaintiffs, by William, son of Henry de Sutton put in Roger's place by the King's writ, and Andrew de Midelton, deforciant of an eighth part of the manor of Midelton, near Sutworth, except an oxgang of land.

Andrew acknowledged the said eighth part to be the right of Alice, and rendered it to Roger and Alice, to have and to hold to them and the heirs of Alice, for which Roger and Alice gave him 20 marks.

96. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Martin, 12 Edward II. [18th November, 1318].

Between Robert de Lathum and Katherine, his wife, plaintiffs, by Henry Gilibrond put in her place by the King's writ, and Thomas de Lathum (fn. 7) and Joan, his wife, deforciants of 13 acres of land and 10d. of rent in Rayneford.

Thomas and Joan granted the said tenements to Robert and Katherine, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to Thomas, son of the said Robert, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to John de Bellew (de Bella Aqua) and Joan, his wife, (fn. 8) and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of the said Robert, for which Robert and Katherine gave them 10li.

97. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 12 Edward II. [20th January, 1319].

Between Walter le Clerk, of Erghum [Arkholme], and Agnes, his wife, plaintiffs, by Robert de Berewyk put in the place of Agnes, and John de Brouham, chaplain, deforciant of 2 messuages, 1 oxgang and 13 acres of land, and 3 acres of meadow in Erghum [Arkholme].

Walter acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of John, for which John granted them to Walter and Agnes, to have and to hold to them for their lives, after their decease a messuage and the said oxgang to remain to John, younger son of the said Walter, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to William, brother of the said John, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of William. The other messuage, 13 acres of land, and the said meadow to remain to the said William and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the said John, his brother, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of the said John.

98. At Westminster, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 12 Edward II. [10th June, 1319].

Between Adam de Ursewyk and Isabella, his wife, plaintiffs, by John Horn of Claghton put in Isabella's place, and John de Horneby, the younger, deforciant of the manor of Coupmanwra [Capernwray].

Adam acknowledged the said manor to be the right of John, for which John granted it to Adam and Isabella, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of Adam. (fn. 9)

99. At York, on the Octave of the Purification, 13 Edward II. [9th February, 1320].

Between Thurstan de Northlegh and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs, by Adam de Assehurst put in Margery's place, and Robert del Clogh and Joan, his wife, deforciants of the manor of Great Hoole, and of 4 messuages, 63 acres and 2½ oxgangs of land, 20 acres of wood, and 10s. 6d. of rent, in Ulfneswalton [Ulneswalton], Laylond, Croston, Pembirton, Brethirton, and Eccleston in Laylondshire.

Robert and Joan remitted all rights to Thurstan and Margery (fn. 10) and the heirs of Margery, for which Thurstan and Margery gave them 200li.

100. At York, on the Octave of the Purification, 13 Edward II. [9th February, 1320].

Between Adam Broun of Pilkyngton, plaintiff, and Roger de Pilkyngton and Margery, his wife, deforciants of two parts of the manors of Pilkyngton and Chetham.

Roger acknowledged the said two parts to be the right of Adam, for which Adam granted them to Roger and Margery, to have and to hold to them and to the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of Roger. (fn. 11)

101. At Westminster, at three weeks from Easter day, 13 Edward II. [20th April, 1320].

Between Adam Le Waker and Dulcia, his wife, plaintiffs, and Hugh, son of Ralph Kybbyl, of Worston, tenant of 10 acres of land and 6 acres of meadow in Worston.

Adam and Dulcia remitted all right to Hugh and his heirs, for which Hugh gave them 10li.

102. At York, on the Octave of St. Michael, 13 Edward II. [6th October, 1319].

Between Geoffrey, son of Robert de Bury, plaintiff, and William del Burghhes and Alice, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 14 acres of land, 1½ acres of meadow, and 1 acre of pasture in Bury.

William and Alice acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Geoffrey, for which Geoffrey granted them to William for his life, after his decease to remain to Margery, daughter of Richard de Radeclif, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Henry, son of the said Margery, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to Alice, sister of the said Henry, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to Agnes, sister of the said Alice, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to the right heirs of Margery. (fn. 12)

103. At York, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 13 Edward II. [13th October, 1319].

Between Richard Le Feure, of Bilyngton, plaintiff, by Oliver de Stansfeld put in his place by the King's writ, and Richard del Faldworthyng, of Kerdyn [Cuerden], and Matilda, his wife, deforciants of an acre and a rood of land in Walton in Le Dale.

Richard and Matilda remitted all right to Richard le Feure and his heirs, for which Richard gave them 40s.

104. At York, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 13 Edward II. [13th October, 1319].

Between Margery, daughter of Richard de Radeclif, plaintiff, by Robert de Pynyngton put in her place by the King's writ, and Roger de Pilkynton and Margery, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 16 acres of land, 12 acres of meadow, and 22 acres of pasture in Bury.

Roger and Margery remitted all right to Margery, daughter of Richard, and her heirs, for which Margery gave them 20 marks. (fn. 13)

105. At York, on the Octave of St. Michael, 13 Edward II. [6th October, 1319].

Between Nichola, late the wife of Roger de Brokholes, plaintiff, and Gilbert de Syngleton, deforciant of a messuage, 32 acres of land, and 3 acres of wood in Brokholes, and a third part of the manor of the same town [of Brockholes].

Nichola acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Gilbert, for which Gilbert granted them to Nichola for her life, after her decease to remain to Adam, son of Roger de Brokholes, and Margaret, his wife, and to the heirs of Adam.

106. At York, on the Quindene of St. Michael, 13 Edward II. [13th October, 1319].

Between John, son of Thomas de Parva Preston, plaintiff, and Roger de Pylkyngton and Margery, his wife, deforciants of a third part of the manors of Pylkyngton and Cheteham, a sixth part of the manor of Barton, and a seventh part of the manor of Crompton.

Roger acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of John, for which John granted them to Roger and Margery, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of Roger. (fn. 14)

107. At York, on the Octave of St. Martin, 13 Edward II. [18th November, 1319].

Between Ingram de Gynes and Cristiana, his wife, plaintiffs, and John, son of John de Cauncefeld, and Baldwin de Gynes, deforciants of a third part of the manor of Scotford and of the moieties of the manors of Wyresdale and Essheton [Ashton, near Lancaster], except 400 acres of land, 40 acres of meadow, and 160 acres of wood in the manor of Wyresdale.

John acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Cristiana, for which Ingram and Cristiana granted a third part of the manor of Scotford and a moiety of the manor of Essheton to John, to have and to hold of Ingram and Cristiana and the heirs of Cristiana for his life, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. After his decease to remain to Baldwin de Gynes and the heirs of his body, to hold of Ingram and Cristiana and the heirs of Cristiana, rendering 40li. by the year for the lives of Ingram and Cristiana, and a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist to the heirs of Cristiana. In default of an heir of Baldwin to remain to Robert, brother of Baldwin, for his life, after his decease to revert to Ingram and Cristiana and the heirs of Cristiana. Moreover, Ingram and Cristiana granted that the moiety of the manor of Wyresdale with the appurtenances aforesaid which Gilbert del Lyndeseye held for term of life, should remain to Baldwin and his heirs. (fn. 15)

108. At York, on the morrow of St. Martin, 13 Edward II. [12th November, 1319].

Between Adam de Hulton and Avice, his wife, plaintiffs, by Henry Fraunceys put in his place by the King's writ, and Alexander, son of Roger de Denton and Cecilia, his wife, deforciants of an oxgang of land in Denton.

Alexander and Cecilia acknowledged the said land to be the right of Adam, to have and to hold to the said Adam and Avice, and the heirs of Adam, for which Adam and Avice gave them 100s.

109. At York, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 13 Edward II [20th January, 1320].

Between Richard de Rysshton, plaintiff, and Henry son of Richard de Risshton, deforciant of a fourth part of the manor of Risshton.

Richard acknowledged the said fourth part to be the right of Henry, for which Henry granted it to Richard for his life, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. After his decease to revert to Henry and his heirs.

110. At Westminster, on the Quindene of St. John the Baptist, 14 Edward II. [8th July, 1320].

Between John de Horneby, plaintiff, and Robert, son of Adam de Tunstal, deforciant of a messuage, a garden, 13 acres of land, and 3 acres of meadow in Farleton.

Robert granted the said tenements to John and his heirs, for which John gave him 20li.

111. At Westminster, at one month from the day of St. Michael, 14 Edward II. [27th October, 1320].

Between Adam, son of William, son of Ralph de Liverpol, plaintiff, and Adam Cordewan and Emma, his wife, deforciants of a messuage in Liverpol.

Adam and Emma acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Adam, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which Adam gave them 40s.

112. At Westminster, at one month from the day of St. Michael, 14 Edward II. [27th October, 1320].

Between William, son of William de Worthinton, plaintiff, and William de Worthinton and Alice, his wife, deforciants of the manor of Worthinton, except 2 messuages, 35 acres of land, and 5 acres of meadow.

William and Alice acknowledged the said manor to be the right of William, son of William, and rendered it to him, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which William gave them 100 marks.

Henry de Worthinton put in his claim.

113. At Westminster, at three weeks from the day of St. Michael, 14 Edward II. [20th October, 1320].

Between William le Botiller, of Weryngton, and Sybil, his wife, plaintiffs, and John de Staunton, deforciant of the manors of Laton, Great Merton, and Great Sonky.

William acknowledged the said manors to be the right of John, for which John granted them to William and Sybil, to have and to hold of them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of William.

114. At Westminster, at three weeks from the day of St. Michael, 14 Edward II. [20th October, 1320].

Between John le Norreys, plaintiff, by John de Akcres put in his place by the King's writ, and John Caluelegh (fn. 16) and Margaret, his wife, deforciants of a fourth part of the manor of Specke.

John and Margaret remitted all right to John le Norreys, for which John gave them 10li.

115. At Westminster, on the Quindene of St. Hilary, 14 Edward II. [27th January, 1321].

Between Thurstan de Northlegh and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs, and Robert de Preston, deforciant of 7 messuages, 2 oxgangs, 37 acres of land, and 5 acres of meadow in Pemberton. (fn. 17)

Thurstan acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Robert, for which Robert granted them to Thurstan and Margery, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of Thurstan.

William de Waleton put in his claim.

116. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 14 Edward II. [20th January, 1321].

Between Richard, son of Hugh de Caldecotes [Coldcoats], and Joan, his wife, plaintiffs, and Robert, son of Robert de la Croyce [Cross], of Lathum, deforciant of a messuage, 66 acres of land, 14 acres of meadow, and 40 acres of wood in Great Penhulton [Great Pendlcton, par. of Whalley].

Richard acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Robert, for which Robert granted them to Richard and Joan, to have and to hold to them and the heirs of the body of the said Richard, in default to remain to Adam, son of Robert de Caldecotes, and Joan, his wife, and the heirs of the body of the said Adam, in default to remain to William, son of William de Hedersford [Edisford], and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to William, son of William de Caldecotes, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to Margaret, daughter of William de Hedersford, and the heirs of her body, in default to remain to the right heirs of the said Richard.

117. At Westminster, on the morrow of the Ascension, 14 Edward II. [29th May, 1321].

Between John de Horneby, (fn. 18) plaintiff, and Adam de Berdeseye and Cristiana, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and 14 acres of land in Horneby.

Adam and Cristiana acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of John, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which John gave them 20li.

118. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter, 14 Edward II. [3rd May, 1321].

Between William, son of Robert de Huyton, plaintiff, and Robert de Huyton, the elder, deforciant of 7 messuages, 26 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, and 4 acres of wood in Bullyng [Billingc].

Robert acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of William, for which William granted them to Robert for his life, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. After his decease to revert to William and his heirs.

119. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter, 14 Edward II. [3rd May, 1321].

Between Hugh de Standissh, plaintiff, and Adam le Wryght, of Wygan, and Cecilia, his wife, deforciants of a moiety of a messuage, 14 acres of land, and 2 acres of meadow in Dokesbury [Duxbury].

Adam and Cecilia acknowledged the said moiety to be the right of Hugh, and rendered it to him, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which Hugh gave them 10 marks.

120. At Westminster, on the Quindene of Easter, 14 Edward II. [3rd May, 1321].

Between John de Huyton, plaintiff, and Robert de Huyton, the elder, and Agnes, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 24 acres of land, 1 acre of meadow, and 1 acre of wood in Skelmardisdale.

Robert and Agnes acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of John, for which John granted them to Robert and Agnes for their lives, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. After their decease to revert to John and his heirs.

121. At Westminster, on the Octave of Holy Trinity, 14 Edward II. [21st June, 1321].

Between Hugh de Rochefort (Rupe forti), plaintiff, and Fromund de Norhampton and Hawise, his wife, deforciants of a moiety of the manor of Alston. (fn. 19)

Fromund and Hawise acknowledged the said moiety to be the right of Hugh, for which Hugh granted it to Fromund and his heirs.

122. (fn. 20) At Westminster, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 14 Edward II. [1st July, 1321].

Between Robert, son of Adam Ireland (de Hibernia), plaintiff, and Robert de Kirkedale, deforciant of the manor of Kirkedale.

Robert de Kirkedale acknowledged the said manor to be the right of Robert and rendered it to him, to have and to hold to him and his heirs, for which Robert, son of Adam, gave him 100li.

123. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 14 Edward II. [1st July, 1321].

Between Alexander [le] Waleys, plaintiff, and Simon de Gnyp, deforciant of 2 messuages, 12 tofts, 80 acres of land, 6 acres of meadow, 6 acres of wood, and 4 acres of waste in Broghton [Broughton-in-Cartmel], and Holker.

Alexander acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Simon, for which Simon granted them to Alexander, to have and to hold to him and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to Roger, brother of the said Alexander and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to John, brother of the said Roger, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to Simon, brother of the said John, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to William, son of Alexander le Waleys, and his heirs.

124. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 14 Edward II. [1st July, 1321].

Between Thurstan de Northlegh and Margery, his wife, plaintiffs, and Robert de Preston, deforciant of the manor of Great Hole, and of 4 messuages, 63 acres and 2½ oxgangs of land, 20 acres of wood, and 10s. 6d. of rent in Ulneswalton, Leylond, Croston, Pemberton, Bretherton, and Eccleston in Leylondschire.

Thurstan and Margery acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Robert, except a third part of the said manor, for which Robert granted them to Thurstan and Margery, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies. Moreover, Robert granted that the third part of the said manor, which John de Crofte and Emma, his wife, held in dower of the said Emma, of the inheritance of the said Robert, on the day this concord was made, should remain to Thurstan and his heirs after the decease of Emma. (fn. 21) In default of an heir issuing of the bodies of Thurstan and Margery all the said tenements to remain to the right heirs of Thurstan.

This concord was made in the presence of John and Emma, and they did fealty to Thurstan and Margery in the Court.

125. (fn. 22) At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 15 Edward II. [6th October, 1321].

Between Adam Gilibrond, plaintiff, and William Gilibrond and Margery, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, 67 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow, 8 acres of wood, and 3s. of rent in Kenyan, Culchith, Weryngton, Lauton, Crofte, and Penketh.

William and Margery acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Adam, for which Adam granted them to William and Margery for their lives, after their decease to remain to Robert de Ryseleye and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of Margery. (fn. 23)

126. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 15 Edward II. [6th October, 1321].

Between John de Horneby, plaintiff, and John Bonny and Margery, his wife, deforciants of a messuage, an oxgang and a half of land, and 6d. of rent in Tunstal.

John and Margery remitted all right to John de Horneby and his heirs, for which John gave them 20 marks.

127. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 15 Edward II. [6th October, 1321].

Between Richard, son of Robert de Holand, plaintiff, by Adam de Asshehurst put in his place by the King's writ, and William de Wodefal and Cristiana, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and 8 acres of land in Reynford.

William and Cristiana remitted all right to Richard and his heirs, for which Richard gave them 20 marks.

John de Rayneford put in his claim.

128. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 15 Edward II. [October 6th, 1321].

Between William de Wodefal and Cristiana, his wife, plaintiffs, and Roger, son of William Wodefal, deforciant of 2 messuages and 26 acres of land in Sutton.

William acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Roger, for which Roger granted them to William and Cristiana for their lives, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, after their decease to remain to Robert, son of the said William, and the heirs of his body, in default to revert to Roger and his heirs.

129. At Westminster, on the morrow of St. Martin, 15 Edward II. [12th November, 1321].

Between William, son of Richard Baret, of Ayntre, and Alice, his wife, plaintiffs, by the said William put in Alice's place by the King's writ, and William de Spellawe and Margery, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and 5 acres of land in Lyverpol.

William de Spellawe and Margery acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of William, and rendered them to William and Alice, to have and to hold to them and their heirs, for which William and Alice gave them 10 marks.

130. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Michael, 15 Edward II. [6th October, 1321].

Between William de Wodefal and Cristiana, his wife, plaintiffs, and Roger, son of William Wodefal, deforciant of a messuage and 5½ acres and a moiety of an oxgang of land in Sutton.

William acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Roger, for which Roger granted them to William and Cristiana, to have and to hold to them, of Roger and his heirs for their lives, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, after their decease to revert to Roger and his heirs.

131. At Westminster, on the morrow of St. Martin, 15 Edward II. [12th November, 1321].

Between Adam, son of Simon le Palmer, and Ellen, his wife, plaintiffs, by the said Adam put in Ellen's place by the King's writ, and William de Spellawe and Margery, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and 7½ acres of land in Derby [West Derby].

Adam acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Margery, for which William and Margery granted them to Adam and Ellen, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, of the said William and Margery and the heirs of Margery, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, in default to revert to William and Margery and the heirs of Margery.

132. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 15 Edward II. [20th January, 1322].

Between Matthew de Adburgham, "Trumpur," and Joan, his wife, plaintiffs, and Thomas, son of Roger del Grene, deforciant of a messuage and 40 acres of land in Broghton [Broughton in Salfordshire].

Matthew and Joan acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Thomas, for which Thomas granted them to Matthew and Joan, to have and to hold to them and the heirs issuing of their bodies, in default to remain to the right heirs of Matthew.

133. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 15 Edward II. [20th January, 1322].

Between Richard le Waleys, plaintiff, and Robert, son of Robert de Bolde, deforciant of the manor of Lytherlond, near Halsale [Uplitherland], a fourth part of the manor of Dalton, near Lathum, a third part of the manor of Aghton [Aughton], near Bykerstath, and the advowson of the church of the said manor of Aghton.

Richard acknowledged the said tenements to be the right of Robert, for which Robert granted them to Richard to have and to hold the said manor, fourth part and advowson to him and the heirs male which he should beget by Matilda, his wife, in default the said manor, fourth part, and advowson to remain to the right heirs of Richard and [to have and to hold] the said third part to the said Richard for his life, after his decease to remain to John, son of the said Richard for his life, and after his decease to remain to Richard, son of the said Richard, and his heirs.

134. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 15 Edward II. [20th January, 1322].

Between Robert, son of Thomas Blundel, and Matilda, daughter of William Blundel, plaintiffs, by John de Accres put in her place by the King's writ, and Thomas Blundel and Emma, his wife, deforciants of 28 acres of land in Aghton [Aughton in West Derby Hundred].

Thomas and Emma granted the said land to Robert and Matilda, to have and to hold to them and the heirs which Robert should beget by Matilda, of Thomas and Emma and the heirs of Thomas, rendering a rose at the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, in default to revert to Thomas and Emma and the heirs of Thomas, for which Robert and Matilda gave them 10 marks. (fn. 24)

135. At Westminster, on the Octave of St. Hilary, 15 Edward II. [20th January, 1322].

Between John de Cophull, plaintiff, and Richard del Weteshagh, deforciant of the manor of Cophull [Copul].

John acknowledged the said manor to be the right of Richard, for which Richard granted it to John for his life, after his decease to remain to John, son of Richard, son of John de Cophull, and the heirs which he should beget by Alesia, his wife, in default to remain to John, son of John de Cophull, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to Thomas, brother of the said John, son of John, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to Robert, son of Emma Risserasse, and the heirs of his body, in default to remain to the right heirs of the said John de Cophull.

136. At York, on the Octave of St. John the Baptist, 15 Edward II. [1st July, 1322].

Between Nicholas le Chapman, of Mellyng, plaintiff, and Roger Pachardi and Matilda, his wife, deforciants of a messuage and 5 acres and a moiety of an oxgang of land in Erghum [Arkholme], which William le Chapman holds for the term of life.

Roger and Matilda granted that the said tenements, which after the decease of William ought to revert to Roger and Matilda and the heirs of Matilda, should revert to Nicholas and his heirs, for which Nicholas gave them 100 marks.

This concord was made in the presence of the said William, and he did fealty to Nicholas in the Court.

Footnotes

1 Respecting the family of Halghton of Westhoughton, see Cockersand Chartulary, p. 678 in notis.
2 Anabilla, or Amabel, was one of the three daughters and coheirs of Richard Fitton, of Great Harwood and Rufford, and widow of Edmund de Lea. John de Hesketh was the son of her sister Matilda, by William Hesketh. The said William and Matilda purchased from Amabel her pourparty of the estates which had descended to her from her father. See Lancashire Fines, pt. i, p. 177.
3 The account of the descent of the manor of Croston in all the editions of Baines' History of Lancashire, is so painfully incorrect, that a few notes by way of correction will not be out of place. The descent of the manor from Adam de Montbegon, who died circa 1185, to John de la Mare is briefly noticed in the Cockersand Chartulary, p. 460 in notis. Roger de Montbegon who died in 1226 gave Croston to John de la Mare to hold by the service of one knight, as recorded in the Testa de Nevill, p. 411 b— "Dominus Rogerus de Monte Beconis feffavit Johannem de la Mare de uno feodo in Croston infra comitatum." In 1242, John de la Mare paid 2 marks to the Scutage of Gascony for this fee (Ibid. p. 400 b). He was chief lord of one moiety of the manor of Tottington, in which connection he was party to a fine touching land in Shuttleworth in 1227 (Final Concords, pt. i., p. 49). In 1256 he warranted half a ploughland in Little Hoole to Richard le Boteler (Ibid p. 124). Dying about 1270, he was succeeded by William de la Mare, probably his son, who resigned his interest in the manor of Tottington to the Earl of Lincoln in 1274, for which the Earl granted to him the manor of Longton. William de la Mare died before the 16 Edward I. (1288), in which year it was found by inquest taken after the death of William de Ferrers, that the said William held Chorley of the heirs of William de la Mare (as parcel of the manor or lordship of Croston). In 1302, upon the collection of the Aid to marry the King's eldest daughter, the heirs of John de la Mare rendered payment of 40s. for one knight's fee in Croston cum membris, which they held of the fee of Hornby (Lane. Lay Subsidies, 130–3). Apparently John de la Mare who was a minor in 1288, had subsequently succeeded to his father's estates and had deceased before 1302. He left issue two daughters, who were probably also under age in 1302, viz., Isabel and Alina. Isabel became the wife of John le Fleming, son and heir of Reiner le Fleming, of Wath. William Fleming, of Wath, esquire, sixth in descent from the above John, had issue two daughters and coheirs, both named Elizabeth. The elder was married to Richard Croston, of Croston, and the younger to Thomas Hesketh, of Rufford, who divorced her in 1497, when she married Thurstan Hall. Alina, the younger daughter of John de la Mare, was married to Sir William de Lea, a younger brother of Sir Henry de Lea, of Lea, Ravensmeols, Charnock, and other estates in co. Lane., and of Mollington Banastre, co. Chester. The said Sir Henry was beheaded in 1315 for complicity in the rebellion of Adam Banastre against Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, his estates descending to his sister Sibilla, wife of Richard de Hoghton, of Hoghton. Sir William de Lea had issue a son, William de Lea, who married Isolda, who joined with him in levying a fine of the moiety of the manor of Croston, and a fourth part of the manors of Longton and Uplitherland in the 46 Edward III., to the intent to make a settlement of these estates. He left issue an only daughter Alice, who married Thomas Ashton, and was the mother of Sir William Ashton, chivaler, who was seised of one moiety of the manor of Croston in the 9 and 24 Henry VI., from whom descended the family of Ashton of Croston. The fine of 11 Edward I., was made in order to settle the manor of Croston upon the issue of John and Isabel le Fleming.
4 From this it appears that John de Hornby or his ancestor had been sometime previously enfeoffed in the manor of Ireby, and held it of the Tathams of Tatham.
5 William de Worthington held the manor directly of the lords of Manchester. Mabel "de Haghe" was dau. and heir of Hugh le Norreys, of Haigh, Blackrod, and Westleigh, and wife of William de Bradshagh (Chetham Society, vol. xcv, p. III). Edmund Nevill was of the family of Nevill of Leversedge, co. York, and Nevill Hall, in Ulverston. Ellen de Rokkelegh was probably the wife of one of the Rockleys of Rockley, in the parish of Worsborough, co. York. I am unable to throw any light upon the meaning of this Fine. Cf. No. 85 of 26 Edw. I. Final Concords, pt. i., p. 185.
6 See the Transactions of the Lanc. and Chesh. Arch. Society, vol. xvii, p. 37.
7 Probably of Mossborough in Raynford.
8 From this we learn that Joan, only dau. of Sir Robert Lathum, by Katherine, his wife, was the wife of John de Bellew, son of John de Bellew.
9 The manor of Capernwray, representing one-fourth part of Over-Kellet, probably came to the family of Urswick by marriage with the daughter and heir of Henry de Coupmanwra. This fine, like that in Lanc. Fines, pt. i., p. 211, seems to have been made for the purpose of settling the manor upon Adam and Isabella, and the heirs begotten between them. Isabella was living in 1346.
10 Margery, wife of Thurstan de Northlegh, has been named before as Margery, daughter of John de Walton of Ulneswalton, in a Fine made 29 Edward I. (pt. 1, p. 194). In a schedule containing the names of those who had been distrained to do homage to King Edward II, after the attainder of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, in 1322, I find under Penwortham— "Thurstanus de Northlegh qui ut de jure uxoris suæ tenet in Walton in Leylondshir ij carucatas terræ pro vta parte unius feodi militis." (Duchy of Lancaster, Knights' Fees, 1—3.) Thurstan is frequently described in error as Adam de Norleigh (see Lanc. Inquisitions, Chetham Society, xcix, p. 35, in notis). Perhaps Adam was son and heir of Thurstan and Margery. They were no doubt descended from the Cheshire family of Norley. (Ormerod's Hist. of Cheshire, edit. 1882, ii, p. 142.) This fine appears to ratify an alienation of the above lands by Robert del Clogh and Joan, his wife, probably daughter and coheir of John de Waltoun, to Thurstan de Northlegh and Margery, his wife, of the said Joan's pourparty of her father's lands. Cf. no. 124 post.
11 See nos. 30 supra and 106 post.
12 Fine no. 44 (page 13) states that Margery, the wife of Henry de Bury, lord of Bury, slain there in 1315, was the daughter of Richard de Radcliffe. She had issue—Henry, who died without issue; Alice, who married Sir Roger de Pilkington, to whom she brought the manor of Bury about the year 1330; Agnes and Isabella. As stated on page 37, in notis, she assumed her maiden name after the death of her husband. Cf. Fine no. 106 post.
13 Cf. Fine no. 102 supra.
14 The printed pedigrees of the Pilkington family are very incorrect in the earlier generations. The following descent, though not proven at all stages, is probably correct:—(1) Alexander de Pilkington was lord of Pilkington, temp. Richard I. and John. See the references to him in the Great Inquest of co. Lancaster, taken in A.D. 1212 (Testa de Nevill). He was succeeded, before 5 Henry III., 1221, by (2) Roger de Pilkington, who was no doubt the son of the said Alexander. In the year named he was defendant with Geoffrey, son of Luke, in a plea brought against them in the King's Court by Henry de Boulton (Curia Regis Roll, no. 78, m. 4d.). He was a witness to a charter of Gilbert de Notton to the Abbey of Stanlaw touching lands in Chadderton, which was executed before 1222 (Whalley Coucher, p. 49). He married Ellen, sister of Sir Geoffrey de Chetham, by which marriage the manors of Chetham and Crompton descended to his son, Alexander de Pilkington, after the death of Sir Geoffrey shortly after 1271, as son and heir of Ellen, sister of the said Sir Geoffrey. Roger de Pilkington was found to be holding the 4th part of a knight's fee in Pilkington of the fee of Thomas Grelley by the inquest taken in December or January, 1242–3, to make inquiry as to knights' fees for the levying of the Scutage of Gascony (Testa de Nevill, p. 403b). (3) Alexander de Pilkington attested various charters between 1260–1280. In Trinity term, 5 Edward I. 1277, he brought a suit against Adam de Prestwich and others for wrongfully throwing down a ditch in Pilkington, to the injury of his free tenants there (Assize Roll, no. 1235, m. 11d). He held Pilkington in 1282 of Robert Grelley by knight's service, as found by the inquest taken after the death of the said Robert on April 25th in that year (Mamcestre, p. 137). He died before 1291, for on June 10th in that year Roger de Pilkington—his son as I suppose—had a charter of free warren in Pilkington and in its hamlets, viz., Whitefield and Unsworth, and in Chetham, Crompton, Sholver, and Wolstenholme (Charter Roll, 19 Edward I., no. 41). By letters patent dated 23rd February, 18 Edward I., 1290, the said Roger had a grant from the King of 100li. in consideration of his services in Gascony and Aspes (Cal. of the Patent Rolls, p. 352). Upon the collection of the Aid levied 31 Edward I., 1302, he paid 10s. for the fourth part of a knight's fee in Pilkington (Duchy of Lanc., Knight's Fees, 1—3). About this time Alice his mother, by the title of "Alice, formerly the wife of Alexander de Pilkynton," in her widowhood gave to Adam, son of Geoffrey de Chadirton, lands near Bele water in Crompton, which he had by the gift of "Roger de Pylkynton, my son" (Clowes Deeds). The charter of Roger here referred to is dated at Mamecestre, on Sunday next after the feast of St. Hilary, 35 Edward I. (15th January, 1307), and has attached a seal of dark green wax bearing on a heater shield a cross patonce (Ibid). (5) Roger de Pilkington settled the manors of Pilkington and Chetham upon his son Roger and his heirs male, saving his own life interest, by Fine levied on the Quindene of Easter, 5 Edward II., 1312 (See above p. 9). On 16th October, 1313, he participated in the pardon granted by the King to Thomas, Earl of Lancaster and his adherents for the death of Peter de Gavaston (Cal. of Patent Rolls, A.D. 1313, p. 21–2). Roger de Pilkinton and William Gentil were commanded to choose 600 foot-soldiers in co. Lanc., which the said Roger was to lead to Newcastle-on-Tyne to be there on July 15th, 1317, to march with the King against the Scots (Rotuli Scotiæ I., p. 171). He was frequently engaged in connection with the military affairs of the county at this period (Palgrave's Military Writs). His wife was Margery, named in this Fine, whom he married before 4 Edward II. She appears to have brought him one-sixth of the manor of Barton, and one-seventh of the manor of Crompton. Sir Roger took the part of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, and having been taken prisoner, was committed to prison at Tickhull Castle after the Earl's defeat at Boroughbridge, on March 16th—17th, 1322. Sir Adam de Swylington, knt., one of the King's officers in co. York, prayed the King to grant Roger pardon, who spared his life in consideration of a fine of 300 marks. He was discharged from prison on July 11th, his bond and recognizance being dated at York on that day. Notwithstanding this pardon, Roger died during the summer of that year, and Adam de Swylington immediately married his widow. By letters close dated November 13th, 1322, she obtained an order directed to John Travers, keeper of the rebels' lands in co. Lanc., not to meddle with the lands which had been settled upon her by the Fines of 13 Edward II, which are specifically mentioned, viz., the manors of Pilkington and Chetham, one-sixth of the manor of Barton, one-seventh of the manor of Crompton, and lands in Farnworth, Great Leaver, Honorsfield, and Spotland, but to restore them to her with all the rents received therefrom (Cal. of Close Rolls. pp. 610, 648). On February 10th, 1327, the King acquitted Adam de Swylington, "who married Margery, late the wife of Roger de Pilkington" of the aforesaid fine of 300 marks (Ibid., A.D. 1327, p. 21). (6) Roger de Pilkington, son and heir of Sir Roger, appears among the free tenants of Salfordshire [at Michaelmas] 17 Edward II, 1323, as "Roger de Pilkyngton," holding seven-eighths of the manor of Rivington. (Rentals and Surveys, no. 379.) Upon the collection of the Aid granted in the 20 Edward III., 1346 (but collected in the 29 Edward III., 1355), to make the King's eldest son a knight, "Roger de Pilkinton for the fourth part of one knight's fee in Pylkynton, which he holds of the said John [de la Ware], which Roger de Pilkynton, his ancestor, formerly [i.e., in 1242–3] held there of the aforesaid fee [formerly Thomas Gredley's] rendered 10s." (Lanc. Lay Subsidy, 130—16). He married Alice, sister of Henry de Bury the younger, in whose right, by virtue of the settlement made in 1313 (see page 13), he became lord of the manor of Bury. In the roll last referred to he is named as rendering 40s. to the Aid granted in 1346, "for one knight's fee in Bury in Salfordshire, which he holds of the said Duke [Henry], which Adam de Bury formerly [i.e., in 1242–3] held there." (Ibid.) Alice is usually stated to have been sister of the Henry de Bury who held Bury in 1302 and 1311. This is, however, disproved by the Fine of 1313, and is clearly incompatible with the period during which she was alive. Henry de Bury was slain at Bury in the 9 Edward II., 1315, a commission of oyer and terminer being issued on October 16th that year in connection with his death. (Cal. of Patent Rolls, p. 419). On October 24th, 1317, Thomas Banastre, a prisoner in Lancaster Castle charged with causing the said Henry's death, had letters to the Sheriff to release him on bail (Cal. of Close Rolls, p. 502). In the schedule of the names of those distrained to do homage to Edward II. in 1322, I find "Margery de Bury, who holds the manor of Bury for one knight's fee" (Knights' Fees, 1—3). She is now clearly identified as the widow of Henry de Bury. Another record, a Feodary of the same period, records that "Margery de Radeclive and Henry her son hold 3 carucates, 6 oxgangs of land in Bury for one knight's fee (Ibid, 1—11). It was not unusual for a lady to resume her maiden name after her husband's death, especially when seised for life of her late husband's estates. The record also states that she held Bury jointly with her son, whose name was Henry, and who was evidently a minor. He never succeeded to the family estates, probably dying during his minority. After his death the manor descended to Roger de Pilkington and Alice, his wife, as sister and heir of Henry de Bury, the younger. In the year 1360, Alice, widow of Roger de Pilkyngton, and Roger, son of Roger de Pilkyngton, obtained from the Chancery of Henry, Duke of Lancaster, an exemplification of the record and process of an imparlance between Henry de Bury, complainant, and the said Alice and Roger, defendants, touching the entail of the manor of Bury (32nd Report of the Dep. Keeper, p. 348). This Henry, the complainant, was no doubt descended from a younger branch of the family of Bury, representatives of which held lands in Bury as late as the sixteenth century. (7) Sir Roger de Pilkington, chivaler, son of Sir Roger de Pilkington, and Alice de Bury, was a juror on an inquest taken March 6th, 1385. He died in the year 1407, when a post mortem inquest was taken, by which it was found that he died on January 2nd that year, and that Sir John de Pilkington, chivaler, was his son and heir, and of the age of 34 years.
15 Christiana de Lindsay was great-grand-daughter of Alice, sister and co-heir of William de Lancaster, 4th baron of Kendal. She married Ingelram de Ghisnes, or Gynes, lord of Courcy, before 11 Edward I. (see Cockersand Chartulary, vol. i, p. 301 in notis). An inquest was taken after the death of Ingelram, at Warton, on May 23rd, 1324. He had issue—William, a French subject; Ingelram, who died s.p.; Baldwin, who is named in this fine; and Robert (see the Complete Peerage, by G.E.C. s.t. Ghisnes; Furness Coucher, p. 395 et seq.).
16 See "Calveley of Little Caldy," Ormerod's History of Cheshire, 1882 edit. II, p. 489, showing the connection with Norreys of Speke.
17 See No. 99 supra.
18 John de Hornby figures in a previous Fine in 35 Edward I., 1307, as a purchaser of land in North Lancashire (Final Concords, Part I, p. 212). He was lord of the manor of Ireby. Edmund de Hornby held 3 oxgangs of land in Claughton-in-Lonsdale in 1346. Of the same family were John de Hornby, parson of Tatham in 1382, William de Hornby, parson of St. Michael-on-Wyre 1379—1385, and others, some of whom were officials of the Duchy.
19 One moiety of Alston belonged to Sir Robert de Holland, whose mesne tenant was probably Fromund de Northampton.
20 This Fine was levied to ratify the alienation of the manor of Kirkdale from Robert de Kirkdale to Robert de Ireland, who subsequently appears in the Extent of 1322 as the tenant, holding the manor in chief of the King. The Kirkdale family continued as under-tenants of the Irelands.
21 From which it appears that Emma was kinswoman (daughter or sister) of Robert de Preston, and probably the widow of one of the Waltons of Hoole and Ulneswalton. Cf. No. 99 supra.
22 Feet of Fines, Lancaster, File 22, 15–17 Edward II.
23 The explanation of this Fine appears to be that Margery, widow of Henry (?) de Risley and mother of Robert de Risley, married after her first husband's decease, William de Gilibrand, and obtained the above-mentioned premises as her dower.
24 Cf. Aughton Deeds, No. 7 (transcribed by A. Patchett).