Newcastle-under-Lyme
Schools and charities

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Victoria County History

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J. G. Jenkins (editor)

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1963

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64-75

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'Newcastle-under-Lyme: Schools and charities', A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 8 (1963), pp. 64-75. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=53363 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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Schools (fn. 1)

There is some justification for the claim, made 50 years ago, that Newcastle had been the educational centre of North Staffordshire for three and a half centuries. (fn. 2) It had produced in the Grammar School and the Orme School, re-formed after 1872 as the High School, the main means of secondary education for most of the area, including the Potteries. (fn. 3) The early history of the Grammar School falls within the scope of another volume, but its later history after the merging of all the educational endowments of the town in 1872 (fn. 4) is treated here. The first mention of a schoolmaster in the town occurs in 1565 (fn. 5) and the Grammar School arose from various endowments, not becoming in effect a grammar school until the end of the 17th century. (fn. 6) Until then it was the town school. (fn. 7)

The Orme School was founded under the will of the Revd. Edward Orme (d. 1705), at one time master of the borough school, who left various lands in trust, the revenue to be applied to educating and apprenticing the poor children of Newcastle. (fn. 8) After his term as master of the borough school the character of the school had been altered by William Cotton's endowment of 1692 from that of an English school to a grammar school, and Orme's endowment was designed to remedy the lack of a school where more elementary education could be provided. (fn. 9) The school was established in the Presbyterian meetinghouse near St. Giles's Church, (fn. 10) but after the burning of the meeting-house by rioters in 1715, a separate school building was erected in the chapel yard. (fn. 11) Meanwhile, in 1708 a scheme for regulating the school had been drawn up by John Fenton. (fn. 12) One of the regulations required the teaching of the Church Catechism. Reading, writing, and accounting, however, constituted the greater part of the curriculum. (fn. 13) In 1709 the trustees invested part of the funds in the purchase of a farm at Knutton. (fn. 14)

In 1715 dissension arose over Henry Hatrell's administration of the trust, particularly over the expense incurred in building the new school and schoolhouse. New trustees were ordered to be appointed in 1727, but the order was subsequently set aside on legal grounds. (fn. 15) In 1773 the school received further endowments under the will of John Cartwright. (fn. 16) The endowments of the school in 1825 were reported to consist of a farm at Knutton (48 acres), a close at Knutton (2 acres), a malthouse at Newcastle (£21 p.a.), land in the recently inclosed Pool Field (2 roods), land in the recently inclosed Stubbs Field (3 acres), land at Knutton (2 acres), a small allotment upon the recently inclosed Knutton Heath (1 acre), and the school and schoolhouse in Newcastle, the total yearly income being £165. The number of pupils was then reported as being 50 annually since 1797, and the syllabus covered reading, writing, and arithmetic.

The accounts of the charity were in such confusion by 1825 that in the Charity Commissioners' opinion the funds could not be further expended without a Chancery order. (fn. 17) The school was closed from the date of the inquiry for twenty years (fn. 18) while a suit about the financial difficulties of the trust was in progress, until finally in 1845 new trustees were appointed in Chancery. (fn. 19) A new trust scheme was drawn up in 1847 (fn. 20) under which the trustees sold the former school and built a new one on the site of the former corporation workhouse in Higherland bought by them in 1846. (fn. 21) The Orme School reopened in the new building in 1851. (fn. 22) Total receipts of the trust in 1847 amounted to £292 and by 1856 the amount invested was £2,673. The mineral rights of the Knutton farm were by this date providing a valuable additional income in royalties, amounting in 1856 to £1,882, in 1857 to £2,420, and in 1858 to over £7,000. The investments of the charity exceeded £15,000 by 1862 and £22,000 by 1866, and by 1872 were just under £29,000. (fn. 23)

Meanwhile the size of the school grew as it increased in prosperity. Until the end of 1855 the average number of pupils had been about 70. In December 1855 50 new boys were entered following the appointment of an additional master. From 1856 until the end of 1863 there were 120 pupils, increased to 150 in 1864 after the appointment of another master. (fn. 24) Extensions to the buildings were proposed in 1868, and in 1869 an inquiry into their necessity was held by the Charity Commissioners. Almost immediately after the report appeared the Endowed Schools Act (fn. 25) was passed. This gave the commissioners the right to alter the purpose of and to consolidate educational trusts. (fn. 26) On the basis of a report made in 1868 (fn. 27) by T. H. Green, the philosopher, the entire system of secondary education in the borough was revised.

Although the Orme School at this date was flourishing, the Grammar School had declined. Green reported of it that 'an impression that the school is unwholesome has definitely prevented boys from being sent to it' and 'the professional men seemed to have quite given up using the Grammar School.' (fn. 28) He further reported that 'among the more educated inhabitants of the Potteries [he] found a general sense of the want of a good middle and grammar school.' (fn. 29) Hitherto pupils in the Orme School had been nominated to the school by the trustees, not especially on grounds of poverty, and had usually come from the National and British schools. Green recommended that instead of this system pupils be admitted on merit, so that the Orme School would become superior to these two schools. Further, exhibitions from the Orme School to the Grammar School should be provided if the latter were reorganized. (fn. 30)

A third endowed school, 'a dame school for young children', existed in the borough by 1694. (fn. 31) Founded under the will of John Cowell (codicil dated 1655) and further endowed by Thomas Bagnall, by will dated 1675, and by Ralph Keeling, by will dated 1704, the school had started by 1694 when Jane Fernihough was appointed as school dame. In 1721 she was discharged and it was laid down that the dame should teach only children selected by the mayor, justices, and aldermen of the borough. (fn. 32) In 1825 there were only about 20 children in the school and when the then dame died in 1827 (aged 77) no successor was appointed. (fn. 33)

In 1871 the Charity Commissioners proposed the amalgamation of all the educational charities of Newcastle and the foundation of three schools, an upper school for boys called the High School, a lower school for boys called the Middle School, and a school for girls to be called the Orme Girls' School. (fn. 34) Despite strong local opposition this scheme was carried out in 1872. (fn. 35) The Middle School was housed in the Orme School buildings in Higherland and new buildings were erected for the High School and the Orme Girls' School. The scheme was amended in 1898 and 1907 (fn. 36) to meet changing conditions in education. Under the 1872 scheme (fn. 37) the curriculum of the High School, which had an upper age limit of nineteen years, was the normal grammarschool curriculum with emphasis on experimental chemistry because of the trade and manufactures of the district. Not more than 10 per cent. of the pupils were to be foundation scholars, of whom one-third to one-half were to come from the Middle School. The Middle School was open to boys between the ages of eight and sixteen. All pupils were charged tuition fees and were required to pass an entrance examination in reading, writing, and arithmetic. The curriculum included writing, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, mensuration and land surveying, English, history, geography, political economy, at least one branch of the natural sciences, French, Latin, drawing and music, with special attention to drawing and chemistry as these subjects had most bearing on the manufactures of the district. There were a certain number of exhibitions to it, half of which were to be given to boys at elementary schools in the school district of Newcastle. Arnold Bennett was a pupil of this school and in June 1885, shortly after leaving, passed the London Matriculation Examination in the first division. (fn. 38) The Orme Girls' School was open to girls between the ages of eight and seventeen and the curriculum consisted of English, Latin or French or German, or any two of these, arithmetic and mathematics, history, geography, drawing, music, at least one branch of the natural sciences, domestic economy, needlework, and any other subjects which the governors might add. Half of the exhibitions to this school were to be open only to children from the elementary schools of Newcastle school district.

As at the same time the governors of the endowed schools paid £2,500 to the Newcastle-under-Lyme School Board towards the erection of public elementary schools and £300 p.a. for providing free places in these schools and various other amenities, by the end of 1872 a system of graded education had been established in Newcastle whereby children could by means of scholarships and exhibitions acquire a grammar-school education. The majority of the pupils at the endowed schools would, however, be paying fees. (fn. 39)

The first unendowed school, St. Giles's, was established in 1825. It was affiliated to the National Society. St. Patrick's Roman Catholic School followed in 1833, Newcastle British School in 1834, affiliated to the British and Foreign Schools Society, and a second National school, St. George's, in 1835. These four schools provided elementary education within the borough at a small fee until 1870. All were aided by government grants. In the area which later became part of the borough there were National schools at Chesterton, established in 1814, Silverdale (then called Knutton Heath) established 1847, and Wolstanton, established 1841. The Church of England was mainly responsible, therefore, for primary education in the borough proper and the surrounding area until 1870.

An unexpected result of the Education Act of that year was an immediate increase in the number of church and nonconformist schools. Longbridge Hayes National School was established in 1871, Red Street National School in 1872, Cross Heath Church School in 1876, Chesterton (Dunkirk) Church School in 1876, Knutton Church School in 1874, Wolstanton Wesleyan School in 1871, Silverdale Primitive Methodist School in 1872, and Newcastle Wesleyan School in 1871. Two school boards were formed covering the area of the present borough with the exception of Clayton, Newcastle School Board in February 1871 (fn. 40) and Wolstanton School Board in March 1874. (fn. 41)

The first Newcastle School Board (1871–4) did little of its own accord to further primary education. Using the £2,500 given by the Endowed Schools Trust, it built Ryecroft Schools, costing £3,868 and accommodating 800. (fn. 42) The second board (1874–7) did more, taking over the British school in 1876, (fn. 43) which became Friarswood School, and Newcastle Wesleyan School in 1877 for which new buildings in Hassell Street were erected in 1881. No schools were erected by subsequent Newcastle School Boards. The first Wolstanton School Board (1874–7) opened schools at Silverdale (1875) and Chesterton (1876). In 1881 the Wolstanton Wesleyan School was taken over by the Wolstanton School Board. Thus in July 1903 on the formation of the Newcastle Education Committee (fn. 44) there were three local authority elementary schools in the area and two independent schools, St. Giles's and St. George's Church of England School, and St. Patrick's Roman Catholic School. In Wolstanton, where an education committee was formed in 1905, (fn. 45) there were two public elementary schools at that date, Ellison Street Schools and May Bank School, and two church schools, Wolstanton and Cross Heath.

Various areas had been detached from Wolstanton for educational purposes after the Education Act of 1902 and there were county elementary schools at Silverdale and Chesterton (two). Clayton School had also been transferred to the county from Stoke School Board. (fn. 46) There were church schools at Silverdale, Knutton, Red Street, and Chesterton.

Between the formation of Newcastle and Wolstanton Education Committees and their merger in 1932, no new school was built by the former and only one by the latter, namely Watlands Infants' School to replace Wolstanton Church of England Infants' School. In the same period the county built a school at Knutton in 1914 to take the children formerly in the infants' department of Knutton Church of England School.

In the 1930's, however, Newcastle began to put into effect the proposals of the Hadow Report (1926) and separated children over the age of 11 from those younger. In 1931 the Orme Boys' Senior School was opened in the buildings of the Orme Middle School, purchased by the committee in 1928, (fn. 47) to take senior boys from Hassell Street and Ryecroft Schools. (fn. 48) Broadmeadow Senior School at Chesterton was opened in 1931, taking senior pupils from Chesterton Church School and Albert Street School. (fn. 49) Knutton Senior School was opened in the following year to take seniors from the Knutton and Silverdale area, from both church and county schools. (fn. 50) Westlands Senior Girls' School to take the senior girls from the central Newcastle schools was not opened until 1936, however. (fn. 51) Reorganization on these lines had been completed by the end of 1936 with the exception of St. Giles's and St. George's Church School and the Roman Catholic schools. The Roman Catholic senior pupils were separated in 1938. In the field of elementary education, however, Newcastle was expanding only slightly in the 1930's to meet the needs of new housing areas. Priory Road Infants' school was built in 1934. The need for increased elementary education had been eased by the building of the new senior schools or, where these were housed in the existing buildings of an elementary school, by the provision of a new school for the juniors and infants. (fn. 52)

In the field of grammar-school education Newcastle made great advances in the period between the two world wars. The endowed grammar schools continued to be aided on a per capita basis by the county and Stoke-on-Trent. (fn. 53) The Orme Middle School, condemned in 1923 by the Board of Education, (fn. 54) was closed by 1927, and in 1928 the buildings were bought by Newcastle Education Committee. (fn. 55) The school was replaced in the same year by the erection of a new local authority Grammar School at Wolstanton. (fn. 56) It was designed for 500 boys and laid out on a double quadrangle plan. The school is open to boys from the county area and adjacent parts of Cheshire. (fn. 57)

Under the 1944 Education Act Newcastle was made an excepted district. In the post-war period the chief problem has been to find school accommodation for the growing child population of Newcastle. The education committee has had to provide much temporary accommodation and also has frequently had to house children from one school in another. (fn. 58) New primary schools have been built to meet the need for schools in new housing areas: Bradwell C.P. School (1951), Broadmeadow C.P.

School (opened as such 1958), Crackley Bank C.P. School (1956), Hempstalls C.P. School (1953), Langdale C.P. School (1954), and an independent school, St. Wulstan's R.C. Aided Primary School (1959).

One new secondary modern school has been built, Bradwell County Secondary Modern School, the senior schools established in the 1930's having been converted into secondary modern schools as a result of the Education Act of 1944. (fn. 59) The local authority in 1948 opened a girls' grammar school at Clayton Hall while the two endowed grammar schools, the High School and the Orme Girls' School, not having an income sufficient to qualify them as direct grant schools, became specially aided schools under the terms of the Act. The trust maintains the fabric of the main buildings and the local authority provides for the general running costs.

About one-third of the children in the four grammar schools now come from the county area. Roughly 360 children are admitted to the grammar schools each year, between 20 and 30 from Stoke, (fn. 60) 220 from Newcastle, and 110 from the county. Provision is made in each of the boys' grammar schools for technical education, since there is no technical school in the borough. At the secondary modern schools there is a 4th-year commercial course for selected pupils. Entrance to the grammar schools is by the 11-plus examination, but pupils are later transferred from secondary modern schools to the grammar schools and vice versa, the number affected each year being about 15 to 20. In the secondary modern schools there is a leaving examination assessed by the Education Department of the University College of North Staffordshire but at the present time (1960) there is no provision for taking the General Certificate of Education examination. (fn. 61)

Table I - List of Schools (fn. 62)

C.P. = County Primary C.S. = County Secondary C.E. = Church of England C.E.V.P. = Church of England Voluntary Primary C.E.V.C. = Church of England Voluntary Controlled R.C. = Roman Catholic R.C.A.P. = Roman Catholic Aided Primary R.C.V.S. = Roman Catholic Voluntary Secondary

B = Boys G = Girls J = Junior I = Infants JM = Junior Mixed M = Mixed / = Separate departments

SchoolDate of openingChanges in organizationBuildings
Albert Street C.P. Schools, (fn. 63) Chesterton1876Opened as B/G/I. Senior pupils transferred 1931 to Broadmeadow Senior School. Boys' department became Broadmeadow C.P. School in 1958.Opened in Primitive Methodist Sunday School buildings. New buildings later in 1876. Girls' school erected 1877, infants' school 1891. Annexes to girls' school erected 1949, annexe to boys' school at Broadmeadow C.S. School 1953. Infants in former boys' school since 1958 when girls' school took over former infants' buildings. For boys after 1958 see Broadmeadow C.P. School.
Bradwell C.P. School, (fn. 64) Cauldon Ave., Bradwell Estate, Porthill1951Built to serve Bradwell housing estate; see also Watlands C. P. S.Aluminium building. Since 1953 2 classes housed at Hempstalls C.P. School.
Broadmeadow Council School, (fn. 65) Hodgkinson St., Chesterton1904Infants' school. JM/I by 1912. Became Broadmeadow Senior School in 1931 (q.v.) when infants and juniors transferred to Albert Street Schools.
Broadmeadow C.P. School, (fn. 66) Hodgkinson St., Chesterton.1958Albert St. junior boys transferred to these buildings Dec. 1958.Occupies former Broadmeadow School buildings (ground floor).
Broadmeadow C.S. School, (fn. 67) Hodgkinson St., Chesterton1931Secondary mixed from 1931 to 1958 when girls transferred to Chesterton C.S. School.Occupies former Broadmeadow Council School buildings. Upper story added 1931.
Chesterton C.P. School, (fn. 68) Church St., Chesterton1931Former National School. Became infants' only in 1931.Former National School buildings.
Chesterton National School, (fn. 69) Church St., Chesterton1814Opened as a charity Sunday school and leased as a day school. M/I until 1855. B/G/I from 1855, when it benefited under Betton's Charity. In 1931 school taken over by L. E. A. as infants' school (see Chesterton C.P. School). Other pupils sent to Albert St. C.P., and Broadmeadow C.S. Schools.Possibly rebuilt 1847. Girls' school erected 1855.
Clayton C.P. School, (fn. 70) Clayton Rd., Clayton1874Opened as mixed all-age. Infants only by 1953. Closed 1954.Enlarged 1892. Used St. James's Church also 1951–4. Since 1954 used as annexe to Langdale C.P. School.
Cooper Street Board School, (fn. 71) Wolstanton1875Closed, date unknown.Used buildings of St. John's Wesleyan Sunday School.
Crackley Bank C.P. School, (fn. 72) Chesterton1956Extended 1958.
Cross Heath C.E.V.P. School, (fn. 73) Liverpool Rd., Cross Heath1876Established as mixed all-age school.Former mission church of St. Michael and All Angels. Church hall also used by 1953.
Dunkirk C.E. School, (fn. 74) Heath St., Dunkirk, Chrsterton1876Founded as GI. Closed, date unknown.Held in mission church.
Ellison Street C.P. Schools, (fn. 75) Wolstanton1881Formerly Wolstanton Wesleyan (q.v.). Taken over by School Board in 1881 when BG/I. Since 1932, when seniors transferred to Watlands Senior School (q.v.), run as separate JM/I schools.Used Wolstanton Wesleyan School building till 1895 when present buildings completed. In 1953 using St. John's Sunday School, and St. Andrew's Church Hall.
Friarswood C.P. School, (fn. 76) Friarswood Rd., Newcastle1876Formerly Newcastle British School (q.v.). Taken over by School Board 1876. Mixed allage school till at least 1924.Former building of the Newcastle British School (q.v.). Alterations made in 1877. Rooms at Higherland Methodist Church used as temporary accommodation from c. 1928. In 1948, permanent annexe at Blackfriars, formerly Royal Navy buildings, acquired.
Hassell Street C.P. Schools, (fn. 77) Newcastle1877Formerly Newcastle Wesleyan School (q.v.). Taken over in 1877. Until 1881 M/I. After 1881 B/G/I until 1931 when senior boys transferred to Orme Boys C.S. School and G/I until 1936 when senior girls transferred to Westlands C.S. School.Used former Wesleyan School (q.v.). buildings in School Street. Present buildings erected 1881.
Hempstalls C.P. School, (fn. 78) Collard Ave., Cross Heath1953Building erected 1953.
Knutton C.E.V.P. School, (fn. 79) High St., Knutton1874Opened as M/I. Infants transferred to Kuntton Temporary Council School in 1913. Seniors transferred to Knutton C.S. School in 1932.Enlarged 1878 and 1895. Since 1949 used two classrooms at Knutton C.S.M. School, and since 1947 a Y.M.C.A. hut.
Knutton C.P. School, (fn. 80) High St., Knutton1914Took infants from Knutton Temporary Council School. In 1953 was retaining 1st year of Knutton C.E.V.P. school due to overcrowding there.Enlarged 1938. Used one classroom in Knutton C.S. School temporarily in 1953.
Knutton C.S. School, (fn. 81) High St., Knutton1932Took senior pupils from Knutton C.E.V.P. and Silverdale C.E.V.P. Schools and Silverdale C.P. School.Erected 1932, extended 1936, 1949.
Knutton Temporary Council School, (fn. 82) Black Bank Rd., Knutton1913Took infants of Knutton C.E.V.P. School 1913. Closed 1914 and pupils transferred to Knutton C.P. School.Used United Methodist Sunday School, Knutton.
Langdale C.P. School, (fn. 83) Langdale Rd., Clayton1954
Longbridge Hayes National School, (fn. 84) John St., Longbridge Hayes1871Used for girls and infants.Mission church.
May Bank C.P. School, (fn. 85) High St., May Bank1903Extended 1927.
Newcastle British School, (fn. 86) Friarswood Rd., Newcastle1834Associated with British and Foreign Schools Society from at least 1846. Taken over by Newcastle School Board 1876, and reopened as Friarswood School (q.v.).Site given by Duke of Sutherland. Received government building grant.
Newcastle Wesleyan School, (fn. 87) School St., Newcastle1871Opened as M/I school, closed in 1877 when taken over by School Board (see Hassell Street Schools).Used Sunday-school buildings of Brunswick St. Wesleyan Chapel.
Orme Boys C.S. School, (fn. 88) The Higherland, Newcastle1931Took senior boys from Hassell St. and Ryecroft Schools (q.v.)Using buildings of former Middle School (see pp. 65, 66).
Priory Road C.P. School, (fn. 89) Newcastle1934Temporary weather-board additions, 1939.
Red Street C.E.V.P. School, (fn. 90) Chesterton1872Founded as an all-age National School.Mission church.
Ryecroft C.P. School (fn. 91) 1872Opened as B/G/I. Senior boys transferred to Orme Boys C.S. School 1931, girls to Westlands C.S. School in 1936.Opened in Methodist New Connexion Sunday School. New building 1874, enlarged 1891.
St. George's National School, (fn. 92) Liverpool Rd., Newcastle1835Opened in Holborn as infants' school. Moved to Liverpool Road 1854–60, when it became BG/I. Closed between 1872 and 1876 when merged with St. Giles's National School.
St. Giles's And St. George's C.E.V.C. School, (fn. 93) Bow St., Newcastle1825Opened as St. Giles's National School. Benefited under Hatrell, Bagnall, and Cowell Charities. B/G/I until 1948 when B/G merged into one department containing JM section and SM section.Original infants' school in School Street and original boys' and girls' school in Bath Street. Present buildings erected 1895. In 1947 two huts erected and additional accommodation used in St. John's Sunday school, Liverpool Road. In 1948 former Domestic science centre at Ryecroft School acquired as additional accommodation and from 1950 St. George's Institute has been used.
St. Luke's C.E.V.C. School, (fn. 94) Church St., Silverdale1847Opened as National School for B/G. Evening School for boys in 1855. Subsequently B/G/I. In 1932 senior children were transferred to Knutton Senior School and school reorganize as JM, I.Land given and school built by Ralph Sneyd. Buildings enlarged 1894.
St. Mary's R.C.A.P. School, (fn. 95) Stanier St., Newcastle1938Annexe to infants' school opened in Wolstanton in 1953 (and see St. Wulstan's School).
St. Patrick's R.C. School, (fn. 96) London Rd., Newcastle1833Started as mixed school. B/GI from 1865. In 1938 juniors and infants transferred to St. Mary's R.C.A.P. School (q.v.). this school becoming St. Patrick's R.C.V.S. School (q.v.).Orignal school under same roof as church. New building 1864. Extensions 1883, 1895–1910. New infants' school 1897.
St. Patrick's R.C.V.S. School, (fn. 97) London Rd., Newcastle1938Used buildings of former St. Pattrick's R.C. School.
St. Wulstan's R.C.A.P. School, (fn. 98) Church Lane, Wolstanton1959Took children from Wolstanton annexe of St. Mary's Infants' School and children from St. Mary's Junior School.
Silverdale C.P. School, (fn. 99) Mill St., Silverdale1875Formerly Silverdale Primitive Methodist School (q.v). B/G/I until 1932 when seniors transferred to Knutton C.S. School and school reoganized as JM/I.New buildings erected 1877. Infants' department erected 1886 on opposite side of road. Extensions to junior school in 1909. Infants' school requisitioned 1939–45 by Civil Defence.
Silverdale Primitive Methodist School. (fn. 100) 1872All-age school. Taken over by Wolstanton School Board 1875 (see Silverdale C.P. School).Primitive Methodist Sunday School buildings.
Watlands Council School, (fn. 101) Garnett Rd. West, Porthill1913Took children from Wolstanton C.E. Infants' School which then closed. Pupils transferred to Waltands C.P. School in 1932.
Watlands C.P. School, (fn. 102) Loring Rd., Porthill1932Temporary accommodation provided 1949–51 to house infants living in Bradwell area until opening of Bradwell C.P. School, 1951.
Watlands C.S. School., (fn. 103) Garnett Rd. West, Porthill1932Took senior children from Ellison Street Schools and Wolstanton C.E. School in 1932.Used buildings of former Watlands Council School.
Westlands C.S. School, (fn. 104) Abbots Way, Newcastle1936Took senior girls from Hassell Street and Ryecroft Schools (q.v.).
Wolstanton C.E.V.C. School, (fn. 105) High St., Wolstanton1841Opened as all-age National School. Infants transferred to Watlands Council school in 1913. Seniors transferred to Watlands C.S School in 1932.Rebuilt 1872.
Wolstanton Wesleyan School, (fn. 106) Wolstanton1871Opened as B/G/I/ Closed 1881 when taken over by School Board (see Ellison Street Schools).Using Sunday School buildings of St. John's Wesleyan Church.

Charities for the Poor

As will be seen from the table below, the corporation, either at the express wish of the donor or by its acquisition of the charity lands, (fn. 107) administered from the 17th century onwards an increasing number of the borough charities. Some of these were applied in relief of the poor rate under the decree of 1740. (fn. 108) From 1807 seventeen of the charities which were by then vested in the corporation were consolidated with ten in the hands of the churchwardens. The annual income from the former was £12 12s. (by at least 1824) and from the latter £13 5s. 4d. and was expended in bread and money doles on St. Thomas's Day (21 December). (fn. 109) The distribution, organized by the churchwardens and overseers, was held at the parish church and elsewhere in the town and attended by the rector and leading residents. (fn. 110) In 1896 all surviving Newcastle charities for the poor were vested as the United Charities in a body of trustees on which the corporation had five representatives. The moneys were thenceforward applied in general benefits to the poor of the borough, (fn. 111) often in large grants to the charitable organizations of the district. (fn. 112) In 1952 £47 10s. was distributed in money at Christmas to 47 poor. (fn. 113) In 1955 the United Charities, the funds of the District Nursing Association, and the charities of Eliza Hinds and Richard Mountford were vested as the Amalgamated Charities in a body of twelve trustees, six of them nominated by the borough council and six co-opted. Apart from sums reserved for special purposes such as sermons and, in the case of the Nursing Association, the sick poor of the borough, the income was to be applied in general relief, including weekly doles of between 2s. 6d. and 10s., to the poor of the borough 'as constituted from time to time'. (fn. 114)

By 1663 the corporation had at its disposal several almshouses. (fn. 115) An order was made in 1667 for their repair at the expense of the borough, although in one case the inmate was expected to contribute towards the cost under pain of ejection. (fn. 116) A house near the Castle Pool was taken into the corporation's hands in 1684 and converted into further almshouses. (fn. 117) The corporation almshouses seem to have been superseded by the workhouse (fn. 118) in 1731. (fn. 119)

By the will of Christopher Monck, Duke of Albemarle (d. 1688), a sum of £1,500 was bequeathed for the erection of almshouses for 20 widows, not necessarily from Newcastle, with a further £4,500 as endowment. As a consequence of disputes about the testator's property, it was not until 1743 that his heirs, Grace, Countess Granville, John, styled Lord Gower, and Bernard Granville, erected the 20 almshouses. They also agreed to keep them in repair and provide £160 annually for the maintenance of the widows; out of this sum £20 was to be spent each Michaelmas on gowns and petticoats of blue cloth which were to be worn by the inmates whenever they were in public. Each of the three above-mentioned heirs, with their heirs after them, was to present six of the widows and appoint the remaining two in rotation. By 1824 clothing had not been provided for some years, and the whole £160 was paid in money at the rate of 3s. a week to each widow with an additional 4s. each about Christmas time. The inmates were still chosen from other districts besides Newcastle. (fn. 120) The right of presentation, as well as that of appointing the trustees, remained in the Leveson-Gower family (dukes of Sutherland from 1833) until 1940 when the 5th duke settled a sum of £6,400 stock in redemption of the annual £160 and his responsibility to maintain the premises. By 1914 the 20 sets were occupied by 19 almswomen and a matron; most of the inmates then came from Newcastle, but some were widows of tenants on the Trentham estate. Since the site was required for road purposes, the building was bought in 1940 by the Ministry of Transport for £4,500 which was invested to meet the cost of new premises. Owing to the war, demolition was not carried out, and by agreement ten of the almshouses remained with the trustees rent-free for needy widows and the rest were taken over by the borough for housing. (fn. 121)

The building, which stands at the junction of Bridge Street and Lower Green, is of red brick with a hipped roof and consists of two ranges at right angles to one another. The range facing Bridge Street contains three cross-passages with staircases, each giving access to four sets of rooms, two on each floor. The individual sets consist of living room, bedroom, and pantry. The shorter range facing Lower Green has two entrances and contains eight sets of rooms, similarly arranged. On both facades the doorways and casement windows are surmounted by stone lintels with raised keystones, the upper windows having stone aprons below the sills. The doors and windows at the rear are contained in plain brick openings. In the centre of the Bridge Street front is an open pediment supported on stone console brackets, below which is an inscribed tablet, now (1960) almost illegible. (fn. 122)

Table II - Charities for the Poor

FounderInstrumentEndowmentHistory
John Barker (fn. 123) Will of 1607£40 at discretion of his brother Ralph.In 1612 paid by Ralph to corporation; laid out in purchase of rent-charge of £2 6s. 8d. for distribution to 10 poor on St. Thomas's Day (21 Dec.); by 1760 distributed in Lent in sums of 2s.; by 1824 part of general distribution of bread and money on St. Thomas's Day; one of United Charities from 1819 and still in force 1955 but then no longer vested in corporation.
John Bagnall (fn. 124) Deed of 16196s. 8d. rent-charge vested in corporation.Among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Ralph Brereton of London (fn. 125) Will of 1630£100Laid out by corporation in 1639 in purchase of an estate let for £5. Income distributed in bread every Sunday, and remainder on first market-day after Christmas, to 20 poor. In 1740 consolidated with other money in the corporation's hands in aid of poor rate; £4 6s. 8d., however, continued to be distributed in 20 loaves each week until corporation treasurer stopped the practice in 1820.
Alice, widow of Thomas Clayton (fn. 125) Unknown but by 1639£10
Randle Astbury of Trentham (fn. 125) Unknown but by 1639£10
Unknown (fn. 125) Unknown but by 1639£5
Henry Smith of London (fn. 126) Deed of 1641 putting into effect various deeds made in and after 1620£12 rent-charge, vested in churchwardens and overseers but by 1729 in corporation.By 1729 distributed in clothing; by 1824 allowed to accumulate for periodic distribution in clothing; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Sir John Bowyer of Knypersley (fn. 127) Deed of 1661£5 8s. rent-charge for apprenticing 2 children (£2 10s. each) of poor burgesses and buying them each a bible.At first on apprentice selected by Sir John and his heirs and the other by corporation; by early 19th century mayor selected both; among United Charities from 1896 but lapsed by 1953.
Thomas Bagnall (fn. 128) Will of 167512s. rent-charge on Cold Fair tolls for bread for 12 poor on 12 Sundays after Cold Fair (8 Nov.) through corporation.By 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Richard Heath, alderman (fn. 129) Will of 168510s. interest on £10 for bread, vested in corporation.By 1760 distributed on Sunday after Cold Fair; by 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John Lowe of Marston Montgomery (Derb.) (fn. 130) Deed of 168510s. rent-charge for bread on Quadragesima and Palm Sundays.Among United Charities from 1896, by which time it was vested in corporation, and still in force 1955.
William Beard (fn. 131) Deed of 169010s. rent-charge vested in corporation for bread for poor attending sermon on St. Mark's Day.Among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Sir William Leveson-Gower (d. 1691) (fn. 132) Unknown£2 12s. rent-charge for bread every Sunday, vested in church wardens.Rent-charge redeemed 1861; income 1888 £2 11s. 2d. interest on stock; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John Colclough of Trentham (fn. 133) Will of 1699Interest on £5 for bread on Sunday after 11 Oct.Distribution at executor's discretion; apparently in hands of corporation by 1746; lapsed by 1760.
Francis Wells (fn. 134) Unknown but by 1700£1 interest on £20 for 40 loaves yearly.In hands of corporation by 1725; by 1760 distributed on Easter Day; by 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities by 1896 and still in force 1955.
Mr. Cotton (fn. 135) Unknown but by 1701£5 probably for apprenticing.In 1701 corporation ordered charity to be used in apprenticing poor boys at discretion of justice 'out of the liberty of the town'; nothing further known.
John Baddeley (fn. 136) Will of 17016s. 8d. rent-charge for bread, vested in churchwardens.By 1760 distributed on Shrove Tuesday and by 1824 on St. Thomas's Day; among United Charities from 1896 but lapsed by 1955.
Richard Bagnall (fn. 137) Deed of 1703£1 rent-charge for bread, vested in mayor and other trustees.Between at least 1746 and 1821 applied in apprenticing; distributed in money by 1866 but apparently lapsed by 1896.
Revd. Edward Orme (d. 1705) (fn. 138) Will of 1705£5 rent-charge for apprenticing 2 children under corporation's supervision.By 1824 spent by custom on clothing for boys chosen; among United Charities from 1896 and transferred to control of Ministry of Education on formation of Amalgamated Charities in 1955; still applied in apprenticing in1958.
John Mare (fn. 139) Will proved 17085s. rent-charge for bread on Christmas Day, vested in churchwardens.By 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Ralph Bailey of Normacot Grange. Stone (fn. 140) Will—date unknown but by 1711£2 12s. rent-charge visted in minister and churchwardens.Distributed in Lent by 1760 in sums of 2s.; lapsed 1806.
Katherine, Dowager Lady Gower (d. 1723) (fn. 141) Unknown£1 interest on £20 for bread.In hands of corporation by 1725; by 1760 distributed in August; by 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Nathaniel Beard (fn. 142) Unknown but by 172510s. rent-charge for bread on Sunday after St. Luke (18 Oct.), vested in churchwardens.By 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; lapsed 1861.
Samuel and Obadiah Rock (fn. 143) Unknown but by 172510s. interest on £10 for bread on Sunday after 22 May.In hands of corporation by 1740; formed part of St. Thomas's Day distribution by 1824; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Samuel Sunderland (fn. 144) Unknown but by 172510s. interest on £10 for bread on Sunday after 13 May.In hands of corporation by 1725; part of St. Thomas's Day distribution by 1824; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Isabel, wife of Samuel Sunderland (fn. 145) Unknown but by 17255s. interest on £5 for 20 loaves on Sunday after 13 May.In hands of corporation by 1725; part of St. Thomas's Day distribution by 1824; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John Browne (or Bourne) (fn. 146) Unknown but by 1725£1 interest on £20 for bread in November, vested in corporation.Part of St. Thomas's Day distribution by 1824; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Samuel Bell (fn. 147) Will—date unknown but by 17255s. rent-charge for bread, vested in churchwardens.By 1760 distributed c. 20 January and by 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896; by then vested in corporation, and still in force 1955.
William Boughey (fn. 148) Unknown but by 172510s. interest of £10 for bread on Easter Day, vested in churchwardens.Lapsed 1806; revived after 1824; finally lapsed 1856.
John Boughey (fn. 149) Unknown but by 175210s. rent-charge for bread on whit-Sunday.Lapsed 1806; revived after 1824; finally lapsed 1856.
Bridget Cook (fn. 150) Unknown but by 172510s. rent-charge.By 1760 distributed probably by churchwardens in bread; by 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities by 1896, by which date vested in corporation, and still in force 1955.
Samuel Collier (fn. 151) Unknown but by 175210s. interest of £10 for bread on St. Thomas's Day, vested apparently in corporation.Among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Hannah Bagnall (fn. 152) Will of 1727£1 interest of £20 for bread on 2nd Sunday in Lent, vested in corporation.By 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John Ward, cr. Vis-count Dudley and Ward 1763 (fn. 153) Deed of 1 Oct. 1730£30 interest on £600.Consolidated with charities in aid of poorrate 1740.
John Smith (fn. 154) Will of 172910s. interest on £10 for bread on 1 January.In hands of corporation from 1734; by 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still on force 1955.
William Annion of Clayton (d, 1736) (fn. 155) Will of 1736£1 interest of £20 for bread on Easter and Christmas Day, vested in corporation.By 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Mary Lowe (fn. 156) Unknown; between 1725–405s. interest on £5 for bread in November.In hands of corporation by 1740; part of St. Thomas's Day distribution by 1824; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John Fenton (fn. 157) Deed of 1742£1 interest on £20 for 20 loaves on each Sunday in Lent, vested in corporation.Part of St. Thomas's Day distribution by 1824; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John (or William) Horderen (fn. 158) Will of 175310s. interest of £10 for bread. vested in corporation.By 1760 distributed on St. Thomas's Day; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John Hulme (fn. 159) Will of 1757£1 interest pf £20 for bread on Sunday after 29 December, vested in corporation.By 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
Ann Hulme (fn. 160) Will of 1757£1 interest of £20 for bread on 1st Sunday after 14 August, vested in corporation.By 1824 part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
John Bourne (fn. 161) Probably deed; probably 1758£5 interest of £100, vested in corporation and distributed by churchwardens.Among United Charities from 1896 and still in force 1955.
James Taylor (fn. 162) Will between 1752 and 1760£1 rent-charge for bread on 1st Sunday after 22 May, vested in corporation.By 1824 paid direct to churchwardens and part of St. Thomas's Day distribution; among United Charities from 1869, by when vested in corporation, and still in force 1955.
Ralph Cartwright (fn. 163) Will of 1776£1 10s. rent-charge for bread for 20 poor on 2 January.Paid through the Presbyterian minister until 1805 when it lapsed; by 1896 it had been revived and vested in corporation; and thenceforward among the United Charities, being still in force 1955.
Thomas Fletcher (d. 1783) (fn. 164) Will of 1781£1 interest on £20 for bread on Sunday after 2 February, vested in rector.By 1824 customarily distributed to 20 poor widows; by 1896 paid as interest on £40 stock and still in force as such 1955.
Richard Mountford of Tottenham High Cross (Mdx.) (fn. 165) Will proved 1833£100 for bread on Sunday after 25 March, vested in overseers of the poor.As £98 10s. stock it formed part of the Amalgamated Charities from 1955.
Henry Dobbs of Norwood (Surrey) (fn. 166) Probably deed of 1841£1 10s. interest on £30 for bread, vested in corporation and distributed through rector and churchwardens.First distribution in 1842; lapsed by 1896.
Eliza Hinds of Newcastle (fn. 167) Will proved 1899Residual estate to establish the Eliza Hinds Fund for poor and distressed of Newcastle or for charitable institutions there.Income 1953–4, £60 9s. 2d. interest on £2,015 6s. 3d. stock; then, and for some years before, distributed in sums of 10s., with £1 1s. also to St. George's Parish Poor Fund; among Amalgamated Charities from 1955.
Edward Turner of Newcastle (fn. 168) Will proved 1904£1,000 to be called the Maria Turner Charity; income to be distributed in money and kind at Christmas by rector and churchwardens of St. Giles to poor of parish.Income 1951–2 £28 2s. 4d., distributed in 36 5s. grocery tickets, in gifts of £2 or more, and in sending patients to convalescent homes.
Mayor's Poor Relief Fund (fn. 169) Public subscription in 1921 and transfer of £251 16s. 3d. from other charity funds. Alleviation of distress caused by miners' strike in first instance.Between 1921 and 1950 £476 18s. 2d. distributed by successive mayors to persons in distress; assets in 1950 consisted of £774 16s. 3d. in stock and cash, and the fund is used for occasional relief e.g. grants towards maintenance of the almshouses.
Annie Dutton of Sidmouth (Devon) (fn. 170) Will proved 1933One-third of residual estate for Christmas gifts for poor of St. George's parish.In 1958 still distributed at the vicar's discretion at Christmas and, where funds are available, during the year as required.

Footnotes

1 This article covers only schools supported by charitable endowments or out of public funds within the area of the present boro.
2 T. Pape, Educ. Endowments of Newcastle, 1.
3 With the possible exception of Longton: see p. 307.
4 Pape, Educ. End. Newcastle, 112–19
5 Pape, Restoration Govt. and the Corp. of Newcastleunder-Lyme, 197.
6 Pape, Educ. End. Newcastle, 1–32.
7 Ibid. 32.
8 Ibid. 73.
9 Ibid. 74.
10 Ibid. 75; see p. 56.
11 Pape, Educ. End. Newcastle, 84.
12 Ibid. 78.
13 Ibid. 79–80.
14 Ibid. 85–86.
15 Ibid. 80–87.
16 Ibid. 87.
17 13th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 349, pp. 284–93 (1825), xi, where a full report of the endowments and state of the charity is given.
18 Pape, Educ. End. Newcastle, 94.
19 Ibid. 96–98.
20 Ibid. 100–2.
21 Ibid. 98–100.
22 Ibid. 102.
23 Ibid. 105.
24 Ibid. 106–7.
25 End. Schs. Act, 32 & 33 Vic. c. 56.
26 Pape, Educ. End. Newcastle, 108–9.
27 Ibid. 109.
28 Ibid.
29 Ibid.
30 Ibid. 109–11.
31 Ibid. 59–64.
32 Ibid. 63.
33 Ibid. 64.
34 Ibid. 114.
35 Ibid. 115–19.
36 Ex. inf. the solicitors to the Newcastle Endowed Schools Trust.
37 Copy in possession of Boro. Educ. Officer, Newcastleunder-Lyme.
38 Univ. of London, Senate Mins. 1885–6.
39 Newcastle End. Schs. Scheme, 20 Feb. 1872 (copy in poss. of boro. educ. officer).
40 Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1880).
41 Ibid.
42 Ibid. (1892).
43 See p. 69; P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1876).
44 Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1908).
45 Ibid.
46 In 1896 when Clayton parish was formed.
47 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer (1959).
48 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
49 See pp. 67, 68.
50 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
51 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
52 As at the Watlands Sch.: see above.
53 Ex inf. solicitors to Newcastle End. Schs. Trust (1959).
54 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
55 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
56 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
57 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
58 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
59 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
60 This is a considerable decrease on the numbers before the war from Stoke: ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
61 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
62 The list includes all schools except nursery and grammar schools existing in 1959; it also includes schools that had closed before 1959.
63 Ed. 7/111; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1884); Newcastle Educ. Cttee., Rep. on sch. premises (1953, unpub. ret.); 'Boro. of Newcastle-under-Lyme, 1959 List of Schools' (T/S); ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
64 Rep. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs.'
65 Ed. 7/111; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); Rep. on sch. premises (1953).
66 Ex. inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
67 Ex. inf. boro. educ. officer; Rep. on sch. premises (1953).
68 Rep. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs.'
69 Ed. 7/111; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Rep. on sch. premises (1953).
70 Ed. 7/108; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1896); Rep. on sch. premises (1953).
71 Ed. 7/113.
72 Rep. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs.'; ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
73 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); '1959 List of Schs.'
74 Ed. 7/111.
75 Ed. 7/111; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
76 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
77 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
78 Rep. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs.'
79 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
80 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
81 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
82 Ed. 7/111.
83 Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex. inf, boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
84 Ed. 7/113.
85 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs.'
86 Ed. 7/111.
87 Ed. 7/111.
88 Ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
89 Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
90 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
91 Ed. 7/111; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
92 '1959 List of Schs.'; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); P.O. Dir. Staffs. (1854, 1860).
93 Ed. 7/111; White, Dir. Staffs. (1851); Pape, Educ. End. of Newcastle, 65–67; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
94 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); Kelly's Dir. Staffs.(1916); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.
95 Rap. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs.'
96 Ed. 7/111; Kelly's Dir. Staffs. (1916); Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
97 Rap. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs,'
98 Rep. on sch. premises (1959).
99 Ed. 7/111; Rep. on sch. premises (1953); '1959 List of Schs.'
100 Ed. 7/111.
101 Ed. 7/111; ex. inf. boro. educ. officer.
102 Ed. 7/111; ex inf. boro. educ. officer.
103 Ex. inf. boro. educ. officer.
104 Ex. inf. boro. educ. officer.
105 Ed. 7/111; Kelly's Dir Staffs. (1916); Rep. on sch. premises (1953); ex inf. boro. educ. officer; '1959 List of Schs.'
106 Ed. 7/111.
107 E 134/5 Wm. and Mary/Mich., no. 57; E 134/7 Wm. III/Mich., no. 44.
108 See p. 31.
109 13th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 349, pp. 298–302 (1825), xi; Corp. Order Bk. 1800–25, pp. 341–2.
110 13th Rep. Com. Char. 302.
111 Char. Com. files, Scheme of 22 Sept. 1896.
112 Staffs. Advertiser, 6 Jan. 1912.
113 Char. Com. files.
114 Ibid.
115 Corp. Order Bk. 1590–1669, pp. 203–7.
116 Ibid. p. 229.
117 Ibid. 1669–1712, ff. 32b, 33b, 116b; Ward, Stoke, app., p. lxiii.
118 It is possible that the houses in Higherland converted into the workhouse were almshouses: see p. 33.
119 See p. 33.
120 Boro. Mus., foundation deed (copy), printed in 13th Rep. Com. Char. 295–6; W.S.L., Hand Morgan Coll., Bourne Papers, building account and copy of deed; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 138a.
121 Ex inf. Mr. F. Morris, a trustee (1957); Char. Com. files.
122 See plate facing p. 55. The inscription reads: 'Erected at the expence of the Right Honourable Grace Countess Granville, John Lord Gower, and Bernard Granville, Esq. in completion of the Will of the most noble Christopher Duke of Albemarle, Anno 1743'.
123 13th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 349, p. 293 (1825), xi; Pape, Tudor and Stuart Newcastle, 245–6; Boro. Mus., List of Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 40; Char. Com. files.
124 13th Rep. Com. Char. 302–3; Pape, Tudor and Stuart Newcastle, 79; Char Com. files; Newcastle Par. Reg. i. 72 (Staffs. Par. Reg. Soc.).
125 13th Rep. Com. Char. 303–4; Pape, Tudor and Stuart Newcastle, 113–14, 301, 304; Boro. Mus., Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 53b, which states that Brereton added another £20.
126 13th Rep. Com. Char. 307; 8th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 13, pp. 660–4 (1823), viii; 4th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 312, p. 448 (1820), v; Char. Com files.
127 13th Rep. Com. Char. 297; Corp Order Bk. 1590–1669, f. 200a; Char. Com. files.
128 13th Rep. Com. Char. 301; Char. Com. files.
129 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 13; Corp. Order Bk. 1669–1712, f. 69a.; Char. Com. files; Newcastle Par. Reg. i. 208.
130 13th Rep. Com. Char. 282–3, 305; Char. Com. files.
131 13th Rep. Com. Char. 299–300; Char. Com. files.
132 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300; Char. Com. files; Burke, Peerage (1949), 1942.
133 13th Rep. Com Char. 307; corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, ff. 55a, 146a. It does not appear in the list of 1760.
134 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300; Corp. Order Bk. 1669– 1712, f. 106a; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 12; Char. Com. files.
135 Corp. Order Bk. 1669–1712, f. 109a.
136 13th Rep. Com. Char. 298; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 16; Char. Com. files.
137 13th Rep. Com. Char. 297–8; Corp. Order Bk. 1712– 67, f. 146b; Staffs. Endowed Char. H.C. 91, pp. 38–39 (1869), xlv; Char. Com. files, where in a letter of 1896 it is said to have lapsed.
138 13th Rep. Com. Char. 284, 288; Corp. Order Bk. 1669–1712, f. 128a; Char. Com. files; ex inf. Min. of Educ.; Newcastle Par Reg. i. 267; see p. 64.
139 13th Rep. Com. Char. 299, 321; Char. Com. files.
140 13th Rep. Com. Char. 304–5; Newcastle Char. 1760, nos. 7, 41; Char. Com. files vestry clerk's list of lapsed charities, 1889.
141 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55b; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 24; Char. Com. files.
142 13th Rep. Com. Char. 299; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 54b; Char. Com. files, vestry clerk's list of lapsed charities, 1889.
143 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300, 301; Corp. Order Bk. 1712– 67, f. 55a; Char. Com. files.
144 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300, 301; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55a. Char. Com. files.
145 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300, 301; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55a; Char. Com. files.
146 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55a; Char. Com. files.
147 13th Rep. Com. Char. 299; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55a; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 24; Char. Com. files.
148 13th Rep. com. char. 306; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55b; Char. Com. Com. files, vestry clerk's list of lapsed charities, 1889.
149 13th Rep. Com. Char. 306; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55b; Char. Com. files, vestry clerk's list of lapsed charities, 1889.
150 13th Rep. Com. Char. 299; Corp. order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55b; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 27; Char. Com. files.
151 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300, 301; Corp. order Bk. 1712–67, f. 55b; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 28; Char. Com. files.
152 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 77b; Char. Com. files.
153 13th Rep. Com. Char. 304; Char. Com. files; List of Charities, 1779, in poss. of Town Clerk; S.H.C. 1920 and 1922, 233–4; Complete Peerage, iv. 487–8.
154 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300, 301; Boro. Mus., Bond from Corp. to Joshua Lawton of Knutton, 26 July 1734; Char. Com. files.
155 13th Rep. Com. Char. 300, 301; Char. Com. files; Boro. Mus., release from corp. to execs. of Wm. Annion, 1736; Stoke Par. Reg. iii. 460 (Staffs. Par. Reg. Soc).
156 Abstract of Ret of Charitable Donations, 1786–8, H.C. 511, pp. 1144–5 (1816), xvi (2); 13th Rep. Com. Char. 301; Char. Com. files. It does not appear in the 1725 list in Corp. Order BK. 1712–67, ff. 53b–55b; Char. Com. files.
157 13th Rep. Com. Char. 301; Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 131b; Char. Com. files.
158 13th Rep. Co. Char. 301; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 32; Char. Com. Files; Newcastle Par. Reg. ii. 234.
159 13th Rep. Com. Char. 301; Char. Com. files; Newcastle Par. Reg. ii. 256.
160 13th Rep. Com. Char. 301; Char. Com. files.
161 Corp. Order Bk. 1712–67, f. 183a; 13th Rep. Com. Char. 302; Char. Com. files.
162 13th Rep. Com. Char. 298–9; Newcastle Char. 1760, no. 34; Char. Com. files. It does not appear in the 1725 list in Corp. Order Bk. 1725–67, off. 3b–55b.
163 13th Rep. Com. Char. 306; Char. Com. files; see p. 64.
164 13th Rep. Com. Char. 305; Char. Com. files; Burke, Peerage (1949), 231.
165 Char. Com. files.
166 Ibid; Boro. Mus., Counc. Mins. 1835–44, pp. 248, 323. It does not appear in 1896 list of United Char.
167 Char. Com. files.
168 Ibid.
169 Ibid.
170 Ibid.; ex inf. the Vicar of St. George's (1958).